Trucks, Jeeps

Chrysler and Jeep concepts for SEMA 2016

CJ-66 concept

by Patrick Rall

The Jeep CJ66 Concept will never be a production vehicle. The Mopar team started with a 1966 Jeep CJ body, altered it to fit on a Jeep TJ chassis (1997-2006 Wrangler), and equipped it with a Jeep JK (2007-2017 Wrangler) lights, bumpers, and hood, all painted in Copper Canyon.

The smaller Jeep on the bigger chassis led to interesting proportions in the back, almost giving it a little truck bed area behind the Viper seats. Mopar has filled that little cargo area with a huge 35 inch beadlock wheel/17 inch tire combo (BFG tires, JPP wheels) which matches the set on the ground and capped the whole vehicle with a roll cage, mandril-bent to match the windshield surround.

CJ-66 profile

Since the CJ body seemed too tall after the vehicle was assembled, the crew trimmed the windshield line by 2 inches and on the sides, the Jeep CJ66 Concept has rock rails, wheel flares, and control switches for a well-integrated central tire inflation system. Oversized, concept fender flares defend against obstacles, along with Mopar 10th Anniversary Wrangler JK Rubicon Bumper Kits, JPP skid and front bumper plates, and custom-fit JPP rock rails.

CTIS

Fog lamps are Mopar LEDs; the Warn winch has a fair lead adapter to guide the cable. The fuel cap was moved to sit inside the fender wheel-well. The interior uses a Wrangler JK center console and shifter, with Mopar instrument panel gauges and all-weather mats.

jeep seats

Most importantly, the Jeep CJ66 Concept is fitted by the 5.7L Hemi from the Dodge Challenger R/T, with 383 horsepower being sent to all four wheels via a proper 6-speed manual transmission. That engine is covered by a Mopar engine cover, and has a Mopar cold air intake and cat-back exhaust. Power is driven through Dana 44 crate axles.

345 Hemi

dashboard

It might not be headed for production, but this Jeep is a cool culmination of the various generations of what we know today as the Wrangler.

from Jeep JP66 to Pacifica Cadence

Pacifica 1937

From Chrysler, we have a Pacifica designed to fit someone with an active lifestyle – specifically a surfer with a small dog. On the outside, this sporty minivan has a wrap covering the entire vehicle, adding Mopar logos on one corner and the silhouette of a surfer on the opposite corner, along with the white and blue design. Mopar then added molded running boards, a roofrack that will hold a full sized board, black wheels with blue trim and blue brake calipers to make this minivan particularly sporty.

Pacificia Cadence

On the inside, the Pacifica Cadence has a wireless phone charging system, high wall floormats, door sill guards, a first aid kit, a flat load floor mat in the back, and a dog carrier that tethers in place to keep your pooch secure for the ride.

Dodge concepts •  Ram concepts


venomConcept cars are often made so a car’s feel can be evaluated, problems can be foreseen, and reactions of the public can be judged. Some concepts test specific ideas, colors, controls, or materials — either subtle or out of proportion, to hide what’s being tested. Some are created to help designers think “out of the box.” The Challenger, Prowler, PT Cruiser, and Viper were all tested as production-based concepts dressed up to hide the production intent.


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