2035 SRT Tomahawk Vision Gran Turismo — digital 2035 concept car in 2015

The 2035 SRT Tomahawk Vision Gran Turismo was revealed today in Auburn Hills. The single-seat digital concept was created for Gran Turismo®6 (GT6™) for the virtual track, and will be released this summer with V-10 hybrid power for 2,590 combined horsepower (on the PlayStation console).

2035 SRT concept

There will be three versions of the SRT Tomahawk Vision Gran Turismo, gained by completing online challenges. The entry level is the SRT Tomahawk Vision Gran Turismo S; then there is the GTS-R and the ultimate version X. All are badged for the 2035 model year.

Kazunori Yamauchi, creator of Gran Turismo and president of Polyphony Digital, Inc., wrote that they had to develop new physics for the game “Due to the radical design of the vehicle.”

srt cars

The exterior look came from an internal design competition that sought a futuristic (2035) high-performance Dodge. Anyone, from interns to seasoned designers, was invited to submit a sketch. Designers worked on their sketches in their spare and personal time, producing a flood of proposals. (The name is presumably borrowed from the Dodge Tomahawk V-10 prototype motorcycle, which eventually had ten copies sold at Neiman-Marcus.)

Paul Hoste, who is new to FCA, was selected as the winner; he grew up playing Gran Turismo. The transparent elements, including the cockpit and engine cover, are “made” from ultra-light graphene skins. The driver views the SRT Tomahawk Vision Gran Turismo’s instruments on a clear digital overlay over the windshield.

initial sketches

Active panels above the fenders move, via pneumatics, to create the optimal amount of downforce. An exposed aluminum spine channels air to help cool the V-10 engine. “Functional” NACA style air intakes on the front and large air intakes on the side are used for engine and brake cooling.

A bold, carbon fiber graphic detail is prominent. Thin LED lights and five large exhaust ports are integrated in the rear diffuser.

exhaust and rear diffuser

Mr. Hoste worked with SRT engineering to optimize the hard points and performance numbers of his design for functionality and aerodynamics. The car is intended to achieve the lowest possible center of gravity.

Engineering features of the SRT Tomahawk Vision Gran Turismo (on “paper”) include ultra-light materials for an estimated 1,658 pounds of weight, around that of a Formula One car. The rear wheels are powered by a wide-angle, 144° V-10 engine with 2,168 horsepower. The front wheels are pneumatically driven (independently) for a total 2,590 hp and 1.56 hp per pound, in the maximum performance version.

granturismo 6 Dodge SRT concept car

The pressurized air system not only drives the aerodynamic body panels, but activates the driver’s G-suit during extreme maneuvers. Pressurized air is stored in tanks integrated into SRT Tomahawk Vision Gran Turismo’s chassis to cut weight.

The base model S has a 792 hp, 7.0-liter V-10 (the actual Viper has a 645 hp 8.4 liter V-10) with 215 hp for the front wheels for a total of 1,007 lb and a curb weight of 2,026 lb and top speed over 250 mph. The GTS-R pushes total output to 1,450 hp and cuts weight to 1,459 lb, with a top speed of over 300 mph. Finally, the X has a 14,500 redline, and speed of 404 mph, with a required G-suit for the driver.

levels

The composite chassis uses hollow carbon nanofibers and graphene micro-lattice structures. Filament-wound pneumatic cylinders are integral structural elements laminated into the chassis. The pneumatic front power unit builds up a “chill-sink” with expanding air during power delivery, to increase brake cooling with a minimal amount of air flow.

Next-generation compounds and construction were used to create the tires, with an on-board tire pressure adjustment system.

2035 SRT Tomahawk GranTurismo concept cars

When the Tomahawk Vision Gran Turismo’s brakes are used or the engine is not at max power, the pneumatic power unit compresses air.

Aerodynamics are adjusted in ways other than downforce; it also uses yaw force through splitters and the nine active panels. The exhaust is routed to the rear diffuser using paired runners to increase underbody flow at the rear, creating a blown diffuser effect to increase downforce without adding drag.

tomahawk

The suspension uses variable-rate pneumatic springs with adjustable jounce and rebound damping. An active camber system adjusts the wheel knuckles to “lean” the vehicle into turns.

V-10 powered

See our hands-on review of the new car in the game.

Gran Turismo® celebrated its 15th anniversary in 2013, having first appeared internationally in 1998. It has been the PlayStation®’s most successful franchise, with worldwide sales of 70 million units. In the Vision Gran Turismo project, where automakers, design houses, and brands showcase “concept vehicles.”


venomConcept cars are often made so a car’s feel can be evaluated, problems can be foreseen, and reactions of the public can be judged. Some concepts test specific ideas, colors, controls, or materials — either subtle or out of proportion, to hide what’s being tested. Some are created to help designers think “out of the box.” The Challenger, Prowler, PT Cruiser, and Viper were all tested as production-based concepts dressed up to hide the production intent.


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