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The Millennium Branding System and the Motor Village company dealership

Chrysler dealership signs

Chrysler has adopted new dealer branding standards — the Millennium Branding System — and is enforcing upgrades, telling dealers to scrap signs from before the P2000 program, pentastars, and any trace of older brands, such as Eagle, Plymouth, Imperial, and Valiant, from their signs. The new signs have the four current brands stacked up, with Chrysler on top and Ram on bottom, held up by a silver side pole; the only logos are for Ram and Chrysler, with Dodge and Jeep using stylized letters alone.

dealership signs

The P1900 signs date back to the Valiant days; P2000 signs were used in the 1990s, and P2100 signs in the 2000s. Chrysler requires dealers with sign structures before the P2000 program to scrap them completely — even if they were retrofitted up.

The newer Millennium Branding signs use routed-aluminum panels with push-through copy; the cabinet uses painted aluminum extrusions. The Chrysler badge has fluorescent backlighting; the Dodge, Jeep, and Ram logos use internal LED illumination. Dealer names are black during the day and white at night (using LED-lit performated black vinyl), with specific type and spacing.

The new dealerships

model Chrysler dealership for millenium brandingInstructions for the new signs and dealership structures are extremely specific, going into color, texture, and exact dimensions and angles. All brands must be shown on the building fascia, always in the order Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram; and the Chrysler series of brands must be separated from any other brands (e.g. by the dealer name). Spacing between badges and the size of the dealer name are both specified.

The dealership buildings themselves are essentially "box stores," with a tall arch in the middle. These arches, rising 20-28 feet, are more graceful than the last iteration, which was lower and wider; Chrysler claims that the arches in the towers were inspired by the Chrysler Building. The free-standing arch structure was laid out in surprising detail in the Millennium Branding Solutions booklet, which took effect in April 2010.

The interior brand towers and layout were designed to allow for a variety of layout configurations, accommodating different building layouts and different vehicles.

Motor Village of Los Angeles

Chrysler dealer: Motor Village, Los Angeles

A model for new dealership showrooms is Motor Village of Los Angeles, a brand new, company-owned dealership which opens for business in the first quarter of 2011 (the project began in 2007). This dealership provides Chrysler with a platform to try new, innovative and experimental displays, materials, furnishings, processes and customer services.

All dealers were told to give each Chrysler brand will have its own, unique and separate salon, and this dealer will be no exception; the brand salons should remind customers of the eye-catching displays they would typically see at a major auto show.

showroom interior

The four-level Los Angeles Motor Village is strategically located at 2025 South Figueroa St., just blocks from the Los Angeles Convention Center, the Staples Center arena and the L.A. Live sports and entertainment district in downtown Los Angeles. The area attracts millions of visitors each year.

The dealership’s focal point is a dramatic, five-story glass tower that will be used to display Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram Truck and Fiat vehicles (also part of the new dealership plan). Three large LED reader boards placed atop the glass tower are designed to spread each brand’s logo and message to everyone driving on the I-110 freeway that runs along the west side of the dealership. More than 350,000 vehicles drive past the dealership daily.

LA Chrysler owned dealership

Peter Grady, Chrysler Group’s Vice President of Network Development and Fleet, said, “The Los Angeles Motor Village goes above and beyond the traditional Chrysler Group dealership. This dealership creates a presence both inside and out. Our customers will experience our brands in unique salons that reflect each brand’s identity and character.”

layoutThe building housed a Pierce-Arrow dealership in the 1920s, and marks the return of the Chrysler brands to central Los Angeles after an absence of about 10 years. As an existing building, it does not conform to the exterior requirements of the 2010 “salon” plan.

The Chrysler, Jeep and Dodge brands will occupy the first floor of the dealership, while the Ram Truck brand will be on the second floor. Fiat will have its own, separate entrance to a unique studio.

The Jeep salon will feature Jeep models situated on realistic-looking rock slabs, while Fiat will feature a style center and terrace, and deep, rich woods will be used in the Chrysler salon area. The dealership also features a convenient café and a Mopar Speedshop, a showcase for Mopar performance parts, accessories, and apparel.

Each brand salon will be marked by new signs and kiosk-like information and merchandise towers. The salons also will be equipped with a touchscreen technology called iShowroom which lets customers access feature and competitive information via an advanced interactive kiosk.

The dealership signs

(October 2010) Chrysler is adopting new branding standards for the dealers, who have been told they must scrap any pentastars on their signage, scrap signs from before the P2000 program, and upgrade to new signs at their expense. Dealers must also remove any trace of older brands, such as Eagle, Plymouth, Imperial, and Valiant, along with the pentastar logo at the top of signs created in the P1900 (red, white, and blue) and P2000 (red top, white on gray brands) programs.

The new signs, as pictured at Allpar in the past, have the four current brands stacked up, with Chrysler on top and Ram on bottom, held up by a silver side pole; the only logos are for Ram and Chrysler, with Dodge and Jeep using stylized letters alone.

The specifications for the new signs and dealership structures are extremely specific. Only one sign provider is handling the work; and dealership specifications go into color, texture, and exact dimensions and angles. All brands must be shown on the building fascia, always in the order Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram; and the Chrysler series of brands must be separated from any other brands, at the least by the dealer name. The spacing between badges and the size of the dealer name are both specified.

Dealers who have retrofitted older sign structures to match the P2000 or P2100 signs must remove and scrap their signs. The newer ones use routed-aluminum panels with push-through copy; the cabinet uses painted aluminum extrusions. The Chrysler badge has fluorescent backlighting; the Dodge, Jeep, and Ram logos use internal LED illumination. Dealer names are black during the day and white at night (using LED-lit performated black vinyl), with specific type and spacing.

The dealership buildings themselves are essentially “box stores,” with a tall tower in the middle. These towers, rising 20-28 feet, are more graceful than the last iteration, which was lower and wider; Chrysler claims that the arches in the towers were inspired by the Chrysler Building.

 

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