Starters and alternators used with the 2.2 and 2.5 liter engines

Six different starters were used on EEKs - a Bosch and a Nippondenso direct-drive starter used from 1981-1985, a Bosch and a Nippondenso direct-drive starter used from 1986-1987 on carbureted 2.2s, dominantly in L bodies, a Bosch permanent magnet planetary gear reduction starter (PMPLGR) used on 2.5s from 1986-1995 and various EFI 2.2s from 1986 to 1994, and a Nippondenso offset gear reduction (OSGR) starter used on various EFI 2.2s from 1987-1989.

A front view of the 1981-1985 Bosch and Nippondenso starters. The Bosch is on the left and is identifiable by three flatblade or philips screws holding the solenoid on. The Nippondenso is on the right and is identifiable by the three distinct mounting 'ears' and the two 10mm nuts holding the solenoid on. All three holes in the front housings are unthreaded.

A side view of the 1981-1985 Bosch and Nippondenso starters. 1986 and 1987 Bosch and Nippondenso direct drive starters are similar in appearance and share the same visual clues from this photo. The Bosch is on the left and is identifiable by the flatblade screws in the motor case and the cast aluminum foot on the rear cover, as well as the through-bolt which serves as a pivot for the shifter fork in the front housing. The Nippondenso is on the right and is identifiable by the philips screws in the motor case, and the stamped steel rear cover with a stamped steel foot spot welded to it.

A front view of the 1986-1987 Bosch and Nippondenso starters. The Bosch is on the left and the Nippondenso is on the right. These starters are identical to the 1981-1985 versions, except that the top two holes are thicker and threaded. There is a stud which threads into the upper right hole and is secured on the other side of the transmission by a nut. If the stud is original, it will have a 7mm hex cast into the end of it to aid in removal.

The Bosch PLPMGR starter used from 1986-1995.

The Nippondenso OSGR starter used from 1987-1989 EFI 2.2s

All four 1986-up starters will interchange on all manner of 2.2s and 2.5s, turbo and non-turbo, 8 and 16 valve engines, with the possible exception of the RWD Dakota pickup.

Alternators

Ten different alternators were used from 1981-1995 on 2.2 and 2.5 EEKs: A Chrysler-built 74A unit with a vee pulley, a Chrysler-built 74A unit with a serpentine pulley, a Bosch-built 40/90A with an internal regulator, a Bosch-built 75A, a Chrysler-built 40/90A and 50/120A, a Nippondenso-built 40/90A and 50/120A, and a Bosch-built 40/90A in both new and old styles.

The Bosch-built 75A alternator

The Bosch-built 40/90A internally regulated alternator used on the 1984 2.2 Turbo *ONLY*. If rebuilt improperly, this alternator will cause your 1984 turbo vehicle to keep running indefinitely - even after the key has been shut off. The regulator is mounted to the back of the alternator and IS NOT in the power module.

The Bosch-built 40/90A alternator used from 1985-1989. Visual difference between it and the later version is that the stator (black in this picture) is exposed on the early style, while it is not visible on the later versions. This alternator, along with the later versions, interferes with the mounting of larger oil filters.

The Bosch-built 40/90A alternator used from 1990-~1992. There is also an extremely rare version of this alternator, with a five groove pulley, used on the 3.0L V6

The Chrysler-built 40/90A alternator used from 1985-1989. The style of stator may either be ruffled (shown) or smooth. This is the 90A version, and can be identified by the 'Inspected 90A' tag on the rear cover of OE alternators, and by the single rectifier visible through the back cover (lower half of the alternator). This alternator and its 120A sister are also used on some Ram and Dakota pickups with V6 and V8 engines.

The Chrysler-built 50/120A alternator used from 1985-1989. Identifiable by the two rectifiers visible through the back cover (lower and left halves) and a silver 'Inspected 120A' tag on the rear of OE alternators.

The Nippondenso 40/90A alternator used from 1989-1995. Identifiable by a tag which reads 'FAMILY 90HS' on OE alternators, or by the elongated ears on the rear housing for the mounting of the wiring harness. Similar versions of this alternator and its 120A sister were, and continue to be, used on all manner of Chrysler-built vehicles.

The Nippondenso 50/120A alternator used from 1989-1995. Identifiable by a tag which reads 'FAMILY 120HS' on OE alternators, or by the short, stubby ears on the rear housing for mounting of the wiring harness, and also by its oversized case.

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