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Car and Driver rates Alfa Giulia Quadrifoglio number ONE...

Discussion in 'Fiat News & Rumors' started by SUPER Q, Feb 14, 2017.

  1. Prabhjot

    Prabhjot Member

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    Uses fca's multiair2 tech: does the new Jaguar/LandRover turbo petrol 2 liter, i think i read.
     
  2. Robert Johnson

    Robert Johnson Member

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    The Jag is stunningly beautiful wile the Alfa front end is borderline revolting, the sides a BMW riff and the back end just ok. Just goes to show that looks are purely subjective. The iconic Alfa front grill is just revolting to me.
     
  3. FGA cheerleader

    FGA cheerleader Member

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    It's not identical but most possible something very similar from same supplier.
     
  4. Chase300

    Chase300 Member

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    Well I do like BMW's look, so probably why Alfa's front Triangle I find attractive and nice to see something different.
    Jag just looks bland. You could hang any Japanese nameplate on it and you'd never know better. It already looks 10 yrs old.
    You're going to know the Alfa is a different car.
    Why would you want something that blended into the background?
     
  5. Robert Johnson

    Robert Johnson Member

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    I think BMWs are dreary and making the Alfa resemble the 3 from the side and using the polarizing Alfa maw makes for something different for sure.

    If you think the Jag looks like anything Japanese I dont know what to tell you because modern Japanese luxury is totally Godzilla with Lexus spindal atrocity front grill and the Infiniti Bionic Catfish just plain weird. Acuras with their bird beaks are no better. The Alfa looks ok from the side and back if not exciting, but the front end they hang on it just makes it weird. Hey, sometimes weird sells so who knows? I think the ATS looks better than the Alfa but the interior is not nearly as nice as the Alfa. The Jag would be the one I would get......if I am going to buy a completely unreliable European car I would go with the completely unreliable make with a far more established dealer and parts network.
     
  6. MJAB

    MJAB Active Member

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    I guess also this ones resemble the BMW series 3.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  7. tomaz

    tomaz Active Member

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    The Jag is REALLY bland inside and out.
     
  8. tomaz

    tomaz Active Member

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    I keep telling people that the Giulia is a RWD evolution of this these generations!!!
     
  9. Robert Johnson

    Robert Johnson Member

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    2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio vs. 2017 BMW M3, 2017 Cadillac ATS-V, 2017 Mercedes-AMG C63 S - Comparison Tests (at http://www.caranddriver.com/comparisons/alfa-romeo-giulia-quadrifoglio-vs-bmw-m3-cadillac-ats-v-mercedes-amg-c63-s-comparison-test-2017-alfa-romeo-giulia-quadrifoglio-page-5 )

    The Giulia beat out MB, Caddy and BMW in this comparison based pretty much on its incredible performance.

    BUT

    This:

    "
    Another reminder that we were in an Italian car hit us when we briefly warmed up the Giulia using the remote-start feature. After we entered the car and pushed the start button, the Alfa died. A quick restart illuminated the check-engine light and brought up two messages: “Service Electronic Throttle Control” and “Service Engine.” The Giulia still drove, but it wouldn’t move out of its low-boost advanced-efficiency mode. Fortunately, at the next stop, our always prepared assistant technical editor, David Beard, plugged in his OBD II scanner and cleared the codes. It cured the Alfa, but the fault returned when, in the interest of science, we tried remote-starting the car again. Alfa should include an OBD II scanner as standard equipment, and customers should consider themselves part of the development team.

    We are willing to overlook this hiccup, but it’s a reminder that Italian cars are part comedy and part tragedy. In the Giulia’s case, the comedy far outweighs the tragedy, at least for now."

    And this

    "There are a few things the Giulia doesn’t do well. Apparently, no one thought of making it possible to disable the automatically backtracking driver’s seat when you turn off the car. Alfa promises to fix that for 2018. The bottom cushions are a bit short, and the hard B-pillar trim is an elbow poker. Despite that, we did find a comfortable seating position. The interior design blends a lot of Mazda cues with some Ferrari flair. It’s familiar and attractive, but not as rich as the AMG’s interior. A leather-topped dashboard looks and feels expensive, but the lower you look here, the harder and cheaper the materials become. The audio-system controls and displays are easy to decipher, but the sound from the optional stereo lacks the depth of the other systems. In a world of Google Maps, every new car should have a sharp and clear navigation system. The Alfa’s is years behind the Germans’, although the map view that makes houses into little Italian villas is a charming reminder of the Alfa’s roots."
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 28, 2017
  10. Robert Johnson

    Robert Johnson Member

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    I see that Alfa is living up to its reputation for fun to drive but wretched reliability since Car and Drivers test car crapped out on them just like the earlier testers did in Europe did when tested a few months ago. Lets hope the dealer experience is really good because owners will know Alfa service techs by name.
     
    serpens likes this.
  11. FGA cheerleader

    FGA cheerleader Member

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    What problems on European tests? AFAIK there was no problems during tests of production models. Maybe you wants to point on something which is related to preproduction models.

    IMO, here the problem of "quality" will not be related to Alfa or FCA. It's all about dealers and unfortunately with US system Alfa can't do a lot there.
     
    Prabhjot likes this.
  12. FGA cheerleader

    FGA cheerleader Member

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    Motor Trend comparison is out and not just on video:
    Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio vs. BMW M3 vs. Mercedes-AMG C63 S vs. Cadillac ATS-V Comparison (at http://www.motortrend.com/cars/alfa-romeo/giulia/2017/alfa-romeo-giulia-quadrifoglio-bmw-m3-mercedes-amg-c63-cadillac-ats-v-comparison/ )

    First Place: Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio
    THE BEST ALL-ROUNDER

    To judge a brand-new car’s expected reliability by the reputation of a car produced 30 years ago is absurd, but bad reputations are tough to shake, especially one as well earned as Alfa Romeo’s. Alas every conversation we had about the Giulia Quadrifoglio included concerns of impending catastrophic breakdown. To our surprise, the Alfa showed no sign of weakness during this long, abusive test. Instead, it charmed us all and crippled the competition, claiming an easy victory.

    Why so easy? The sheer breadth of its capabilities. The Giulia is a jack-of-all-trades and master of most. Whereas most cars do one thing well at the expense of everything else, the Giulia simply does everything well. For example, it rides so smoothly, is so quiet inside, and cruises down the highway with such relaxed confidence that we GPS-verified its speedometer to ensure it wasn’t optimistic by 15 mph.

    But then, with the mode selector in Race mode, the Alfa forgets about luxury, transforming into a violent sports sedan with a bad boy attitude none of its three competitors can come close to matching. On track, the Alfa demonstrates athleticism nearing the Cadillac’s but manages an even quicker lap time. The Giulia’s torque-vectoring rear differential helps put every one of its 505 horsepower to good use. There’s no accidental tire smoke here. In fact, the Giulia doesn’t like to do powerslides; it just wants to be fast.

    Speaking of fast, the Alfa’s steering uses an obscenely quick ratio, 11.8:1 with just 2.3 turns from lock to lock. The electrically assisted steering is as light as a Ferrari’s and almost as precise, giving its driver the impression that the Giulia is weightless. Aided by hyperaggressive 60-tread-wear Pirelli P Zero Corsa tires, cornering grip is yuge, which left us puzzled when the Alfa tied the BMW for the least skidpad grip of the group.

    Ignore that number. In fact, ignore all numbers because whether driving in a straight line, in corners, or on a racetrack, the Alfa is incredible. Over broken, twisty tarmac, this sedan’s family lineage becomes clear. Ferrari’s former chief engineer Roberto Fedeli is now Alfa Romeo’s chief technical officer, and the Quadrifoglio’s dynamics bear his stamp. This five-seater possesses the same preternatural ability as the best recent Ferraris to follow your wishes no matter how absurd the request. It does things that seem impossible, feeling like it could change direction while airborne. It shrugs off jumps, bumps, surface changes, and camber swaps as if the laws of physics were rewritten especially for it. You know there must be electronic trickery happening, yet you feel none of it. And better, all of this capability is met with equal parts fun, and that’s something so often missing in very fast cars. The Giulia Quadrifoglio is the closest thing to a Ferrari sedan you can buy.
    ...
     
    AlfaCuda, pumadog, Prabhjot and 2 others like this.
  13. valiant67

    valiant67 Rich Corinthian Leather Level III Supporter

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    Well, as long as we are quoting from that Motor Trend article:
    "What we do see is added complexity on an Italian car. That makes us nervous. We happily awarded the Giulia first place, experiencing no reliability issues at all with the two test cars we abused. Then, a few weeks later, a different Giulia died in traffic, leaving one of our senior staffers blocking the road until the flatbed arrived. And then yet another test car showed off its Italian heritage by stalling randomly during a photo shoot."
     
    Robert Johnson likes this.
  14. Robert Johnson

    Robert Johnson Member

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    This is really too easy: If you are going to claim something, you really should do some checking.

    2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio - First Drive Review (at http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/2017-alfa-romeo-giulia-quadrifoglio-first-drive-review )

    "The car is impressive. Well, mostly. We did find a surprising number of electrical idiosyncrasies in the cars we drove in Italy, from freezing display screens to a check-engine light. We also found the interior trim did little to dismiss stereotypes about Italian build quality, with some cheap-feeling switchgear and a center console that deflected under gentle pressure. We’ll wait to reserve our final judgments until we have more time behind the wheel, but the Giulia Quadrifoglio seems well prepared to battle the competition from BMW, Mercedes-Benz, and Cadillac. It outguns all but Mercedes’ C63 S by a fair margin and—based on our limited first exposure—delivers more emotional appeal, too. This is one comparison test that we’re really, really looking forward to."
     
  15. Robert Johnson

    Robert Johnson Member

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    There is a serious effort I have been noticing to try and shush or ignore these problems. BOTH MT and CD had cars with problems. These cars have serious problems. If press pool cars have problems (ALL carmakers' pool cars are very carefully maintained and prepped) then God help those that buy ones that come off the line without special prep.
     
    serpens likes this.