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PART TWO ~ 2005 Pt Cruiser Will need new head gasket

Discussion in 'PT Cruiser' started by Fullpass, Jan 25, 2017.

  1. pt006

    pt006 Member

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    You will need a big torx male socket for the motor mount. T-55 i think.

    When you assemble the cams, you can turn the crankshaft 1/4 turn from the crank timing mark for extra safety. Then drop the cam in with the sprocket arrow pointed up and 2.4 visible. The cam will sit up because one or more of the cam lobes will hold it up. Lay the bearing cap on the cam with the cam parallel to the head. There will be a gap between the cap and the head. This gap is the thickness of your shims. Wood shims, especially hardwood, work well. Put the shims [you will need 2 [or 10 depending on your method] behind the rear bolt and in front of the front bolt for each cap. Snug the bolts lightly. Remove the shims. Repeat for all the caps or if you made 10 shims, they can be done all at the same time. Leave the 'double' cap by the sprockets off for now. The cam is now parallel to the head. Mark all the bolt heads in one direction [paint dab]. Starting with the cap in the middle, turn both of its bolts down 1/2 turn. Repeat for the caps on either side. Then do the other ones. Repeat this process until the caps are seated. Torque to specs. Spin cam. Should be no binding, but the valve springs will change the force needed to turn it.
     
  2. Fullpass

    Fullpass Member

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    Thanks pt...will look more into it...

    Another update...

    Trying to leave the AC intact...So far so good...Doing some extra steps in order to do so, we will see...extra work, removed fan, radiator from AC condenser...this allows some AC line movement, also removed and supported intact AC compressor...allows engine to move up and down without disturbing AC..also removed AC compressor bracket from block...have a ton of room, just removed upper dog bone, brought out/removed dog bone were the compressor was, also now have access to the 18mm nut on strut tower, which is why most people unbolt the AC to begin with...now I could reach the 18mm nut with a short 3/8 ratchet...with socket on nut, handle pointing to timing cover, I could get a had on it...not enough leverage..to loosen nut by hand with that short ratchet handle, but now that the upper dog bone is off the top of engine mount, I used the partial engine mount still with the T55 bolt installed as a fulcrum point...on top of the mount placed a pipe wrench handle under the ratchet handle. made the pivot...wa la..loosed that 18mm nut. removed the other two 18mm nuts and 10mm nuts holding cruise module..removed upper dog bone mount, allowed for more clearance..now just to the point of removing timing cover, belt, engine mount with T55...will see if I have made enough room to get that mount out...Guess how I zipped the harmonic balance bolt out...well pulled the fuel pump relay...placed 1/2 inch drive ratchet on balancer nut...yep gave the starter a crank...wa la...crank bolt out...I did go to auto zone...they had a harmonic balancer removal tool, just for a Chrysler products. I liked it ..had a pin that fit down the crank shaft thread hole..that was non threaded...pressed against bottom of crankshaft hole, not the threads...people just use the harmonic balancer bolt to press against with puller...thats not a good idea...tool at auto zone worked great.

    So Saturday...should have more time...maybe I can get the cylinder head removed...been working on it like three days already...G
     
  3. LouJC

    LouJC Member

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    Has this with my wife's '98 Subaru and they are know to blow head gaskets (2.5 flat four). We had then done at 109,000 miles and it was OK till recently. Started pushing AF into the coolant tank and saw bubbling in there which with a black discharge is a sure sign of exhaust gas getting into the cooling system. While we could have fixed it again, the car had 187,000 miles on it so we just got her a new car, after 18 years we got our money's worth I guess.
     
  4. Fullpass

    Fullpass Member

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    Saturday Update...

    Short version...one line...Anyone have good luck with remanufactured cylinder heads?


    Long version.

    yep, spent the afternoon and evening taking getting the cylinder head off...I had done this a bit different, left all the AC INTACK, just supported and move the compressor to the side, with fan and radiator out...had taken the upper and lower dog bones out, upper right mount out..timing cover side...with everything removed, T55 bolt out, raise and lower motor to get the remaining mount bolts, timing side..and removed the lower timing cover dust shield...NOW this is where it got easy...Really :} Lowered and pivoted the engine toward the right head light corner...this really opened things up...you can do anything...lower mount, removed easy ~ and I removed the cast T55 mount out the bottom, if you wanted to take the mount out of the frame, the one the t55 goes through to inspect, you can...I did...frame mount good..its made of rubber, internals like the dog bones...which both of mine are bad, upper lower...its easy to get to the timing belt tensioner, undo belt, even replace..when replacing to get the right belt tension...need to aline a spring tab with step in tensioner ..easy you can see the spring and step to get the right tension without a mirror, water pump, idle pulley all easy to due...Now I do have a lot of parts on the floor...and it did take four days...but putting a lot of new parts in...Belt, Belt tensioner, idle pulley, water pump...upper/lower radiator hose...gasket set...All Mopar about 400...on line.

    Now...with the cylinder head off. And it did take me four days...to get to this point

    Inspection of block...carbon deposits on pistons...cylinders 1 2 3 4

    cylinder 1 semi soft carbon..half cleaned of the piston

    cylinder 2, hard carbon deposits on top of piston...normal combustion

    cylinder 3, soft carbon deposits, wet deposits, piston wiped off...clean looks new...mmm slight water stain on cylinder wall, very light

    cylinder 4 soft carbon deposits, wet deposits, piston wiped off...clean looks new

    Inspection of cylinder head valves

    cylinder 1 Two things going on, the bottom of the valves...looks like semi white~ish yellow calcium deposits, crusty...all the other valves on the other cylinders look good.

    Second thing going on with cylinder 1

    The park plug tip looks normal, but the spark plug thread have a bunch of gue on them and the porcelain of the plug has stains on them..the top side at the base...must have been pushing something up the spark plug threads..

    So with the number 1 cylinder valves looking bad...thinking about getting a remanufactured cylinder head with the valves and springs.

    My question, Anyone have good luck with remanufactured heads?
     
  5. ImperialCrown

    ImperialCrown Moderator Level III Supporter

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    This head gasket leak/overheating may have been going on for quite some time before you got the car? Clean piston tops usually mean 'steam-cleaning' by coolant.
    Do you actually see where the gasket seal broke down between the water jacket and the combustion chamber?
    Dissimilar metals + Acidic coolant = Aluminum erosion. Is there pitting in the head where the steel gasket seals off the combustion pressures?
    If the head shows moderate to severe overheat damage, you might consider replacing it. We don't know how long this has been going on. Google around for Mopar R5424847 or an equivalent.
    A water stain on the cylinder wall could be a problem. Coolant can ruin piston rings. It may not have shown up on a compression test. I would continue with the inspection and clean-up before reassembly.
    I would not condemn the head because of deposits or 'dirty' spark plug threads. Spark plug porcelain may have dark stains that may look like a compression leak, but it isn't and it isn't considered abnormal. It is the assembly sealer used in the manufacture of the spark plug:
    Spark-Plugs-Photo2.jpg
     
  6. Christian Otte

    Christian Otte New Member

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    Don't re-use the head bolts! they must be replaced w/ new ones. Not expensive & available at most auto parts stores. I got mine @ auto zone. You don't want to do this job again! Ditto water pump, I had to junk a Neon I had when the pump seized & crashed the valves.
     
  7. Christian Otte

    Christian Otte New Member

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  8. Christian Otte

    Christian Otte New Member

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    Replying to my own post, The reason my Neon crashed the valves was caused by a seized W/P the timing belt shredded & the valves bent. I would take head to an automotive machine shop & have it checked for straightness and possible damage from the leaking gasket. Mine needed a light surface cut to give me a good surface for the gasket to seal against. cheap insurance.
     
  9. Fullpass

    Fullpass Member

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  10. Fullpass

    Fullpass Member

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    The top spark plug, most dirty, from number 1 cylinder

    The clean piston photo is number four, was soft carbon, I wiped it clean, number 3 piston had soft carbon wet, I also wiped it clean, oily sock just to keep walls from rusting, number 2 piston, semi wet, partially clean. And number 1 cylinder, just starting to soften..To me...like a full head gasket failure overtime...no pitting on head or block..All the head bolts were tight, when breaking loose..
     
  11. Fullpass

    Fullpass Member

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  12. Fullpass

    Fullpass Member

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    The top of the photo...is number 1 cylinder with the crusty white valves...which also had the crusty spark plug..I see a place out of Florida has a Cylinder head shop..by the thousands. I can get a remanufactured head with valves $285 shipped with returning prepaid core back...thought that was a good deal. Give them the casting number of head, non turbo, also will give them the casting number of the cams...Hate to part ways with this head, but don't know of anyone that could do the job cheaper.

    Now on the head torque values...I had seen some..that start out at 25lbs then 50, then 50 again, then 1/4 turn...but then I seen some values start out at 25lbs, then 60, then 60 again, then 1/4 turn

    So did Chrysler up the torque value on the head gasket is my question?
     
  13. dana44

    dana44 Well-Known Member Ad-Free Member

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    I would not worry about the sparkplug top, it probably got water or something else that spilled into the hole and crusted up, that's all. You can see where the gasket failed and started leaking between the cylinders in your picture, with the clean piston, so make sure the surface is real clean the way I noted earlier, with the sandpaper scratches on the surface, you want to make sure the cross hatch scratches don't show low spots, the scratches go all the way across the surface. The reman head sounds like a good price, about what it would cost to get a complete valve job. Next thing that hasn't been mentioned is a cause. You may have a poorly working injector, it is about the only thing that blows head gaskets these days, one injector isn't firing properly and the O2 sensor then reads lean or rich, and adjusts the fuel accordingly to compensate, messes things up that way. Sometimes it is difficult to tell a bad injector because of the compensation, so would suggest getting new ones or getting the originals sonic tested/cleaned, make sure they are functioning correctly. And yes, new head bolts, they are "torque to yield" and should only be used once, they are designed to stretch, and don't like to stretch a second time. I don't know as Chrysler changed the torque values, there are now about two dozen torquing sequences across the automotive world.
     
  14. Fullpass

    Fullpass Member

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    Thanks dana44,

    Good info...learn something everyday...will do on the bolts


    Surface of the block is pretty dirty...guess stuff pieces of thing rags down the oil/water valleys until most of the major head gasket debris is removed...then do the cross wet sand...with something flat in hand, Sure that will be a days project...Have about 7/8 hundred dollars worth of parts to order to get this project going and done...Works...then some new shocks and struts..Wet sand/clear coat head lights..restoration headlight project on youtube...getting ahead of my self...half to complete the engine first...just a time thing...

    Thanks for the input everyone...all good info...
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2017
  15. djsamuel

    djsamuel Active Member Level 2 Supporter

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