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88 Dakota/ Intermittent stalling


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4 replies to this topic

#1 Knoclue

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Posted December 11, 2010 at 12:31 am

Greeting! 3.9L, 4X4, Auto, 281K My Dakota has started stalling, generally after it has warmed up, and more frequently when its off the highway - backroads, etc. But it will stall on the highway too. It always restarts right away. After poking around on this forum, it sounds like it might be the Hall Effect sensor. But it's throwing code 52 - oxygen sensor stuck on rich. Would a bad oxygen sensor make it stall like this? Thanks a bunch.

Oh, did change the fuel filter too.

Edited by Knoclue, December 11, 2010 at 12:41 am.


#2 ImperialCrown

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Posted December 11, 2010 at 08:19 am

Does it buck and sputter before stalling or does it run fine and then just shut-off?
Crank position sensors (Hall-effect) may not set a fault code, but usually have to sit awhile before restarting. The rich O2 should probably be addressed first.
If the symptoms are worse when the truck is being bumped around, a wiring harness may be grounding out or have a bad connection. See if you can duplicate the cutting out while moving things around under the hood while it's warm and running.

Edited by ImperialCrown, December 11, 2010 at 08:20 am.


#3 Knoclue

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Posted December 11, 2010 at 11:08 am

Does it buck and sputter before stalling or does it run fine and then just shut-off?
Crank position sensors (Hall-effect) may not set a fault code, but usually have to sit awhile before restarting. The rich O2 should probably be addressed first.
If the symptoms are worse when the truck is being bumped around, a wiring harness may be grounding out or have a bad connection. See if you can duplicate the cutting out while moving things around under the hood while it's warm and running.



Thanks for the reply IC. I would say no, it doesn't really buck before dying, it just shuts down. I'll try to move things around under the hood as you suggest.

#4 Knoclue

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Posted December 11, 2010 at 11:26 am

Let me try and clean this up a bit. I loaned the truck out for several months to a friend and he reported the above problem. He said that he had changed the fuel filter first, then swapped out the coil. I had driven it a bit after its return with no problem, but these were just short jaunts. When I drove it out to cut wood though, the problem reared its head.
I was planning to see if I could rustle up the Hall effect this morning (Saturday), get under the hood, double-check the timing and I'll rattle the various harnesses. Sure wish I knew what each of those were :)
Knoclue

#5 dana44

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Posted December 22, 2010 at 07:51 pm

Two possibilities, but it does not sound like the hall effect, which usually have to rest for about 20-30 minutes before it allows you to restart after she overheats the hall effect, not the engine temperature itself.

You could have a vacuum hose that has started to leak, making the O2 sensor turn to rich to offset the extra air, thus flooding as the engine slows for one thing, or the little dashpot on the front of the throttlebody, looks like a gold/silver anodized small pill bottle with a metal knob out the rear (as mounted) that pushes the throttle to keep the idle from dropping too fast may be faulty (does the idle drop quickly?).

The last thing would be a timing chain that is sloppy and as the engine rpm drops, the injectors in the TB are offset from the valves opening, thus the possible rich condition reading, so grab the harmonic balancer and see how much slop is in the chain. Turn the balancer both directions, you will be able to tell if there is slack before it starts turning the other engine components.


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