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Brake Screech in 2012 Dodge Journey


24 replies to this topic

#21 chuzz

chuzz
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Posted August 2, 2012 at 08:27 am

Geez, that sounds a lot like the local Chevy dealer. They wanted $300 to turn all four rotors on the Equinox. I told them they were a bunch of con artists! I removed the front rotors, took them to my local NAPA and had them turned for $10 apiece. Do these dealerships think that everyone that comes in is a complete moron? WAIT, don't answer that. LOL

#22 JimJenny

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Posted October 9, 2012 at 04:48 pm

Had to replace both front and rear pads/rotors at 22,000 k. on our 2012 Journey. The material was on waranty but labour was 252.00 at my local Halifax dealer. No goodwill $100.00 deductable here but they did acknowledge an issue with the breaks. I hope the replacements are better. Otherwise we are happy with the car.

#23 willy

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Posted October 10, 2012 at 04:50 pm

The Journey may have brake issues but I think one of the problems is people's driving habits. I have a 2009 Journey with about 35K miles and the pads are just fine. But, I don't stomp on the gas and then slam on the brakes, stomp on the gas and slam on the brakes etc. If the light is red, there's no point in racing to it; take your foot off the accelerator and let it coast to slow down. If you're turning for an intersection, slow down ahead of time etc. That's free gas mileage too, BTW. I had over 100K miles on my Vison and the brake pads were still good but I had to replace them because the rivets had rusted out.

#24 Doug D

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Posted October 10, 2012 at 06:57 pm

The Journey may have brake issues but I think one of the problems is people's driving habits. I have a 2009 Journey with about 35K miles and the pads are just fine. But, I don't stomp on the gas and then slam on the brakes, stomp on the gas and slam on the brakes etc. If the light is red, there's no point in racing to it; take your foot off the accelerator and let it coast to slow down. If you're turning for an intersection, slow down ahead of time etc. That's free gas mileage too, BTW. I had over 100K miles on my Vison and the brake pads were still good but I had to replace them because the rivets had rusted out.


While in general I agree with that statement, just about every Journey owner I've run across (whether it be online or in person) has had some sort of brake issues. I drive very light on the brakes and even so, had to replace the front pads on our 2009 Journey at 22K miles. By comparison, my Ram, went nearly 70K miles before needing the front pads serviced.

I think the brake wear issue has to do with a few brake enhancements Chrysler has made - BAS & ESP :

Brake Assist System (BAS)
The BAS is designed to optimize the vehicle’s braking
capability during emergency braking maneuvers. The
system detects an emergency braking situation by sensing
the rate and amount of brake application and then
applies optimum pressure to the brakes. This can help
reduce braking distances. The BAS complements the
ABS. Applying the brakes very quickly results in the best
BAS assistance. To receive the benefit of the system, you
must apply continuous braking pressure during the
stopping sequence, (do not “pump” the brakes). Do not
reduce brake pedal pressure unless braking is no longer
desired. Once the brake pedal is released, the BAS is
deactivated.

Electronic Stability Program (ESP)
This system enhances directional control and stability of
the vehicle under various driving conditions. ESP corrects
for over-steering and under-steering the vehicle by
applying the brake of the appropriate wheel. Engine
power may also be reduced to help the vehicle maintain
the desired path.
The ESP uses sensors in the vehicle to determine the path
that the driver intends to steer the vehicle and compares
it to the actual path of the vehicle. When the actual path
does not match the intended path, the ESP applies the
brake of the appropriate wheel to assist in counteracting
the condition of over-steer or under-steer.
• Over-steer - when the vehicle is turning more than
appropriate for the steering wheel position.
• Under-steer - when the vehicle is turning less than
appropriate for the steering wheel position.

Just another note - coworker of mine has a Pontiac G8 and his rear pads are wearing out faster than his fronts. Why? Because he drives just aggressive enough for the Traction Control to activate brakes on one side or the other.

#25 Jaime

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Posted October 11, 2012 at 11:48 pm

Doug, I think you are right on.


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