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93 Dodge Dynasty brake problems!


9 replies to this topic

#1 bluelinepwr

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Posted May 29, 2012 at 02:03 pm

Hello fellas.

I just picked up a 1993 Dodge dynasty with the 3.0 and optional ABS system. Im having a problem, that my brakes feel really mushy and i have to force the petal all the way to the floor to stop. Ive bled the brakes and changed all my pads and rotors. and still nothing. Still feels the same. I was told it could be the brake master cylinder. So i went looking for one and I cant seem to find it anywere? Not autozone or oreileys. I even asked the dealer and they seemed a little dumbfounded. Any body know about the ABS system on these cars? Or any suggestions?

#2 Bob Lincoln

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Posted May 29, 2012 at 02:07 pm

Bleeding cars with ABS can be tricky. I've heard that some require a scan tool to manipulate the pump, but I don't know much about it, except that you can still trap air.

The other thing I've experienced when braking deteriorated like this was a sticking caliper guide pin. This prevents the caliper from sliding and applying the pads to the rotor properly. Make sure you put high-temp grease on the guide pins whenever you service disc brakes.

#3 bluelinepwr

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Posted May 29, 2012 at 02:24 pm

Bleeding cars with ABS can be tricky. I've heard that some require a scan tool to manipulate the pump, but I don't know much about it, except that you can still trap air.

The other thing I've experienced when braking deteriorated like this was a sticking caliper guide pin. This prevents the caliper from sliding and applying the pads to the rotor properly. Make sure you put high-temp grease on the guide pins whenever you service disc brakes.


yea when i took off brakes i put high temp grease and my brakes got nice and stiff for about a few pumps, then just went back to the same mushy feeling

#4 Bob Lincoln

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Posted May 29, 2012 at 03:11 pm

Did you bleed them in the correct order - right rear, then left rear, then right front, then left front? And keep the master cylinder refilled the entire time?

#5 bluelinepwr

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Posted May 29, 2012 at 05:04 pm

yea i made sure fluid was full at all times. i bled the system, but not in that order. does it have to be bled in that specific order?

#6 valiant67

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Posted May 29, 2012 at 05:12 pm

The car may have serious issues with the brakes. These were an integrated system (Bendix 10) where one single electric pump provides both the regular brake assist and the ABS system. There is no traditional master cylinder on the car.

There is a lifetime warranty on a couple of the parts, but if anything other than those parts are wrong you'll owe the dealer a diagnostic fee and have a large bill if they fix anything else. The cost of the repairs is likely much greater than the value of the car. Parts are available and expensive, the ABS pump runs about $600 from NAPA but that is one of the warrantied parts (pump and accumulator are all that are covered). Even when working 100% this system wasn't very good. As the pump wears it runs more and more until it can no longer build pressure.

The only somewhat economical way to fix the brakes is to rip out all the ABS stuff and convert to traditional hydraulic brakes with the vacuum booster. It's a major undertaking, even the brake pedal has to be changed for the swap. I hope the car was cheap because there is no good news on it.

When I had my 1990 Imperial with this brake system, it would only bleed if I used a vacuum pump to pull the fluid through the system. And yes, the properly bleed the system you have to start with the furthest wheel and work your way in to the closest.

Edited by valiant67, May 29, 2012 at 05:14 pm.


#7 Bob Lincoln

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Posted May 29, 2012 at 05:18 pm

yea i made sure fluid was full at all times. i bled the system, but not in that order. does it have to be bled in that specific order?

Yes, always furthest wheel from master cylinder to nearest, the order I gave. Very likely that's your issue.

#8 fabinator

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Posted May 30, 2012 at 12:10 am

Due to the way the Bendix 10 system works, it can be bled in any order. However, air in the system isn't usually the problem with those. the accumulator will start to leak, the pump will start to leak, and the solenoids inside the... thing, i guess, stop working properly. Brake fluid doesn't play nice with small metal parts and 20 year old electronics, old brake fluid is even rougher. As said before, the only real fix for that system is to change it to vacuum boost. that electro-hydraulic system is dangerous at best, it has real potential to either get you killed, or jack your insurance sky high. If you source all the parts from a junkyard, you're looking at about 75 bucks, and a day of your time. maybe a hundred if you get a new booster.

you will need:

vacuum servo (booster)
master cylinder with reservior
combination valve with all fittings
metal lines from master cylinder to combination valve
brake pedal
vacuum check valve
vacuum port from intake manifold (yours may be there, just capped off)
vacuum line to booster

The job took me four hours, hardest part was one of the nuts that hold the vacuum servo to the firewall... you'll know which one.
You may want to just get a new vacuum servo, it will save some headache.

Make note of what port goes where on the combi valve, and match it with your car. trim, bend, and double flare your existing brake lines to the combi valve, then install it to the inner fender (there should actually be a hole where the bolt for it should go). Don't try doing this after the booster is installed, that could've saved me an hour. removing the brake pedal first makes the booster easier to remove/install. Remove the front seat so you don't kill your neck, just don't lay down on a seat bracket stud... that will kill your back.

The job isn't really that bad, you'll only need a handful of tools, and a double flare tool. if you ever had air susspension in the car, check to see if the compressor is still in there... it can be made into a vacuum pump.

Edited by fabinator, May 30, 2012 at 12:12 am.


#9 B10alia

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Posted June 2, 2012 at 08:18 am

I would spring for a new booster. Most of the ones I've seen in the yards look in pretty sad shape. They'll probably still work, but it's cheap insurance to get a new unit.

#10 Bob Lincoln

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Posted June 2, 2012 at 09:27 am

In MA and many states, it's illegal to sell used brake parts. They can only be sold after professional rebuild.


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