.
cars

Jump to content

allpar, the Chrysler - Dodge - Jeep car and truck site


Hello, Allpar Forums member or visitor! If you were an active member (more than two posts) or subscriber, you would not see this ad!

Register for a free account or Sign in (see top right of page for Facebook/Open ID login icons).


Photo
- - - - -

Found Something About my Challenger I'm Not Too Crazy About


36 replies to this topic

#1 Daytona Dude

Daytona Dude
  • Active Member
  • Others:Invalid E-mail - contact admin
  • 1,208 posts

Posted January 8, 2013 at 08:33 am

Found Something About my Challenger I'm Not Too Crazy About.

 

2012 Challenger Rallye Red Line.

 

First time detail cleaning my wheels and I discover that the black chrome wheels are PLASTIC. Really? Hope I never curb these things. Wonder how long that plastic will hold up? I tend to hold onto my cars at least fifteen years.

 

Dissapointed that they would use plastic wheel covers on a 30+ thousand dollar car.



#2 JoshMHam

JoshMHam
  • Active Member
  • 268 posts

Posted January 8, 2013 at 09:09 am

Found Something About my Challenger I'm Not Too Crazy About.

 

2012 Challenger Rallye Red Line.

 

First time detail cleaning my wheels and I discover that the black chrome wheels are PLASTIC. Really? Hope I never curb these things. Wonder how long that plastic will hold up? I tend to hold onto my cars at least fifteen years.

 

Dissapointed that they would use plastic wheel covers on a 30+ thousand dollar car.

It's called chrome-clad.  They take a lot less maintenance than real chrome wheels. 

 

Also, I don't think it would matter if they were real chrome or chrome-clad, scrape one curb and they will look like crap.


Edited by JoshMHam, January 8, 2013 at 09:15 am.


#3 Stratuscaster

Stratuscaster

    Vaguely badass...

  • Supermen
  • Others:Supporters
  • 19,674 posts

Posted January 8, 2013 at 09:13 am

Wheel covers or wheel cladding? There's a difference.

Trying to locate more information...

#4 Aldo

Aldo
  • Supporters III
  • 1,039 posts

Posted January 8, 2013 at 10:07 am

I got those wheels on my 2012 300S...they looked pretty tough, durable plastic cladding.

 

Like Josh said: hit a curb with anything and it will look like crap.  Difference is, in five years you may be able to find a replacement wheel for regular alloys at a junk yard; I doubt you will for these wheels.  At least they left the plastic cladding off the wheel lip.


Edited by Aldo, January 8, 2013 at 10:08 am.


#5 Dave

Dave

    It's me, Dave

  • Supporters
  • Others:Superfriend
  • 20,646 posts

Posted January 8, 2013 at 10:29 am

Based on how long these have been in use, I suspect you will find them MORE long-lasting than the old style.



#6 TWX

TWX

    DO NOT FEED THE TROLLS!

  • Supporters
  • Others:Forum Leader
  • 8,871 posts
Garage View Garage

Posted January 8, 2013 at 10:39 am

If I'm interpreting what I've read correctly, this "Chrome Clad" business started after automakers had problems with plating over aluminum, so to give the light weight of the aluminum plus the appearance that people wanted, they started with this chromed plastic kick.

 

I don't like plastic covers on wheels generally either.  I had switched the Stratus that I used to have from 14" steelies with hubcaps to 15" factory aluminum wheels, I had put 15" American Racing Torq Thrust IIs on my Cordoba, I've got a set of 16.5" slotted mags for the '82 D350, my wife's car has factory aluminum wheels, my beater truck has factory chromed-steel wheels, and my daily driver has factory aluminum wheels.  In the cases of the Stratus and the Cordoba, I switched wheels when I lost hubcaps.  If I were in your shoes, I'd drive the current tires until their worn out, then look at the wheels.  If they're in good shape, put a new set of tires on 'em.  If they're scrubbed up, consider aftermarket wheels, and if you like the tire size that the car comes with, get wheels that are the same size as the stockers.



#7 valiant67

valiant67

    Rich, Corinthian Leather

  • Supporters III
  • Others:Forum Leader
  • 22,470 posts
Garage View Garage

Posted January 8, 2013 at 07:08 pm

The chrome clad wheels will look better longer (and continue to hold air) a lot longer than a the old chromed aluminum wheels.
The wheels aren't plastic. it's an aluminum wheels with a plastic face glues to it - that's a lot different than a plastic hubcap.

#8 FreeLantz

FreeLantz

    Tried & True Mopar Fan

  • Active Member
  • 2,117 posts

Posted January 8, 2013 at 08:44 pm

It's called chrome-clad.  They take a lot less maintenance than real chrome wheels. 

 

Also, I don't think it would matter if they were real chrome or chrome-clad, scrape one curb and they will look like crap.

Both statements are true, but I'll play devil's advocate and point out that, at least with an alloy wheel after a few scuffs you can have it re-machined and it will look new again.  I know someone who does this for a living at dealerships.  His cost is a lot less than having to replace your typical 18" or 20" OEM wheel.  On trucks and SUV's, the chrome-clad wheels make a lot of sense. It's harder to curb a wheel on a truck with a beefier tire there to protect it.  It's quite easy to do so on a Challenger though.



#9 Christopher

Christopher

    Socially Unacceptable

  • Active Member
  • 4,367 posts

Posted January 8, 2013 at 09:14 pm

If I'm interpreting what I've read correctly, this "Chrome Clad" business started after automakers had problems with plating over aluminum, so to give the light weight of the aluminum plus the appearance that people wanted, they started with this chromed plastic kick.
 
I don't like plastic covers on wheels generally either.  I had switched the Stratus that I used to have from 14" steelies with hubcaps to 15" factory aluminum wheels, I had put 15" American Racing Torq Thrust IIs on my Cordoba, I've got a set of 16.5" slotted mags for the '82 D350, my wife's car has factory aluminum wheels, my beater truck has factory chromed-steel wheels, and my daily driver has factory aluminum wheels.  In the cases of the Stratus and the Cordoba, I switched wheels when I lost hubcaps.  If I were in your shoes, I'd drive the current tires until their worn out, then look at the wheels.  If they're in good shape, put a new set of tires on 'em.  If they're scrubbed up, consider aftermarket wheels, and if you like the tire size that the car comes with, get wheels that are the same size as the stockers.

I was talking to a salesman about this a couple of weeks ago and he said that is precisely why.

#10 Daytona Dude

Daytona Dude
  • Active Member
  • Others:Invalid E-mail - contact admin
  • 1,208 posts

Posted January 8, 2013 at 10:13 pm

If a cast wheel is damaged, it can be reconditioned. Plastic, not so much. Also, I know for a fact that a cast wheel will outlast plastic. My '84 Daytona has cast machined wheels that I merely stripped the clearcoat off then re-cleared. These wheels are over twenty-eight years old! Now, if Mopar sold the "chrome cladding" (i.e. plastic hubcap glued to an aluminum rim) as a replacement part, I wouldn't have a problem. Not what I expected from Dodge. Does GM and Ford use the same "cladding?"



#11 FreeLantz

FreeLantz

    Tried & True Mopar Fan

  • Active Member
  • 2,117 posts

Posted January 8, 2013 at 10:24 pm

GM uses it heavily.  I am pretty sure the chrome wheels on Ford trucks and SUV's are also chrome-clad.  I don't believe I've ever seen it on a Mustang though.



#12 John Rogers

John Rogers

    Paper Tag Rubicon

  • Active Member
  • 4,368 posts
Garage View Garage

Posted January 8, 2013 at 11:17 pm

The term Chrome Clad is used, it is not just fine print. The wheels are described as Chrome Clad.



#13 Daytona Dude

Daytona Dude
  • Active Member
  • Others:Invalid E-mail - contact admin
  • 1,208 posts

Posted January 8, 2013 at 11:25 pm

"Chrome clad" not "plastic clad."



#14 ptschett

ptschett
  • Active Member
  • 624 posts
Garage View Garage

Posted January 8, 2013 at 11:57 pm

A lot of 'chrome' wheels are chrome-clad wheels these days. 

 

Sometimes you can't even assume they're alloy beneath the cover... http://www.autosteel...teel Wheels.pdf



#15 MoparNorm

MoparNorm

    Active Jeeper

  • Supporters III
  • 24,387 posts
Garage View Garage

Posted January 9, 2013 at 01:01 am

I paid extra for my beautiful chrome deep dish wheels on my Chassis/Cab, 6 wheels total.
I wasn't too enthused the first time I rotated the tires and discovered they were plastic inserts clad with chrome...and only 4 of them for the 6 wheels.
They look pretty worn after 10 years and don't buff out like they once did.
I would have paid more for real chrome wheels.

#16 Daytona Dude

Daytona Dude
  • Active Member
  • Others:Invalid E-mail - contact admin
  • 1,208 posts

Posted January 9, 2013 at 07:45 am

What about a PVD finish? They're cost effective, durable, repairable and look great.

 

 

"PVD stands for Physical vapor deposition and is a finish that is as strong as powder coating but gives the same shine as chrome." - American Racing

 

http://www.jegs.com/...498070/10002/-1

 

Don't really understand why Chrysler would even offer "chrome clad" when there is a much better alternative; or AT THE LEAST, make the chrome cladding replaceable.



#17 Daytona Dude

Daytona Dude
  • Active Member
  • Others:Invalid E-mail - contact admin
  • 1,208 posts

Posted January 9, 2013 at 09:04 am

A little testy, are we? Seems Dodge could at the very least offer replacement chrome cladding, rather than requiring a new wheel, if the cladding is damaged. Actually, I'll stick with Dodge, considering my last FIVE cars have been Chrysler products. At least the wheels on my car aren't chrome clad steel, like on the V6 Mustangs.



#18 bumonbox

bumonbox

    Say no to kool-aid

  • Supporters
  • 3,434 posts
Garage View Garage

Posted January 9, 2013 at 09:16 am

Yeah, this doesn't bother me.  Having seen first hand the longevity, or lack there of, of chrome wheels of old, it makes enough sense.  I have been fighting for quite some time with my "Chrome" wheels.    Now mind you, I was able to have the wheels machined, at a cost and it corrects it temporarily.  But I started having issues when the car was 4 years old, and I didn't know at the time, why the tires leaked so darned much.  Then for a bit, I used the "gooooooop" which seemed to help a bit.  But it still leaked, and if the tires got down below 20 PSI the leak would intensify, I had only a matter of hours before it'd go flat.  Which of course didn't get any better with new tires..

 

As always, consider the average customer..  Do they, will they notice that these wheels are anything other than chrome?  Unlikely.  Will they appreciate non leaky wheels after a matter of years - I'd say yes. 

 

I do still have the OEM wheels, mind you, but I have to fight with them, and even now, they need to be checked frequently.



#19 Stratuscaster

Stratuscaster

    Vaguely badass...

  • Supermen
  • Others:Supporters
  • 19,674 posts

Posted January 9, 2013 at 09:19 am

The subject of PVD has been discussed and the reasons for why PVD is not applicable as an OEM offering/solution were provided. It took me 3 seconds to open a new window to the Allpar Forums, perform a search on "PVD", and come up with this topic:
http://www.allpar.co...d#entry11305025

I didn't do that to be a smart-ass - but rather to show that there is a HUGE amount of information buried in the depths of the Allpar Forums, and it's fairly simple to extract it. Moving on...

For all some of us know, the cost to offer replacement chrome cladding on a wheel could exceed the cost of simply replacing the entire wheel as a unit.

#20 Dave

Dave

    It's me, Dave

  • Supporters
  • Others:Superfriend
  • 20,646 posts

Posted January 9, 2013 at 09:22 am

The leaky chromed-metal (forgive me for forgetting the correct term at this time) wheels were a real issue, and frankly, owners blamed Chrysler for using them. Justifiably. 

 

Just try getting those fixed... yeah, maybe you know the right person, or can do it yourself. The average Joe could go to twenty shops and still not have it done right. Oh, they'd all charge... as much as a new aftermarket-Chinese wheel. But the tires would still go flat and the co-workers and neighbors would notice that the vehicle being towed was a Dodge or Chrysler or Jeep... and the person who didn't make it to work because of two or three flats was the Dodge or Chrysler or Jeep owner. 

 

It would be nice if people went back to preferring machined aluminum ... or hubcaps.




.
Allpar

Home · Cars · Engines · Repairs · People
Tool and Car Reviews · News

Please read the terms of use and privacy policy. We are not affiliated with Chrysler Group, makers of cars, minivans, trucks, and Mopar (TM) parts. We make no guarantees regarding validity or applicability of information, opinions, or advice. Posts may be edited and used in other parts of allpar.com and affiliated Mopar (Dodge, Chrysler, etc) car related sites. We have the right to remove or modify any message, and to ban or suspend any user without notice. Logos and site-specific information copyright © 2001-2013 Allpar LLC; Chrysler PR materials remain property of Chrysler Group.