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440 Police Interceptor


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9 replies to this topic

#1 Lord Helmet (converted)

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Posted December 19, 2004 at 08:02 pm

I have a 69 Charger R/T and i'm putting in a 1974 440 Police Interceptor engine. The owner of Bud Olsen's Speed shop in New Jersey told me that it was a heavier block with larger water jackets for cooling, lighter & thinner rods and a forged / steel crank. This was also confirmed by another well known speed shop in Collingdale, PA where I had some additional work done. But just one problem... I can't find it in print anywhere. Does anyone really know about these facts? I was also told that the same bottom end block was used on motor homes and 440 six packs. SOMEONE HAS TO KNOW SOMETHING, this has been driving me crazy for years PLEASE HELP..... I need a drink

Edited by Lord Helmet, December 20, 2004 at 04:12 pm.


#2 dana44

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Posted December 20, 2004 at 05:25 pm

Look on the harmonic balancer and see if there is any kind of casting that says something to the effect of, "external balance cast crank only". If there is a steel crank, it will not have these words and the balancer will be smaller physically. Also, there are basically two rods that I can think of. One is the standard LY (or YL) rod, the other is the beefier 440 6pac. The difference is only a couple ounces of metal, and performance-wise, the smaller rods work just as well, and actually will wind a little faster than the heavier rods. Rods are a funny thing. Some of the most mundane engines ended up with the good (heavier) rods for no apparent reason other than they were needed to complete an engine going down the assembly line (which went in hand with some 2bbl engines getting 440 6pac cams because they were available) without any rhyme or reason for doing so.

Don't worry, I know there were cast cranks on 440 police engines, and they are good and strong, capable of 600hp without batting an eye, able to spin into the 7000rpm range, just like the forged steel cranks of earlier cranks.

#3 Lord Helmet (converted)

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Posted December 22, 2004 at 06:21 pm

Thank You Mr. Dana, it sounds like you know what you're talking about, but I would like to know if there is any truth to what these speed shop guys are saying about the blocks being a heavier casting with larger water jackets. This guy who owned Bud Olsens speed shop wanted to buy my motor because of this fact and he runs some pretty strong cars at the area's dragstrip - what the Heck do I know , I'm just some guy who loves Chargers and is mechanichally inclined(?) guys like you, who know the next phase- past the manuals type crap- that really run the show and guide the rest of us. I appreciate any feedback you give me - Thank You , Rob

#4 aliendude

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Posted January 19, 2005 at 11:59 pm

I heard RV 440's had the larger water jackets as well.

#5 dana44

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Posted January 20, 2005 at 12:06 pm

Check the rest of the stampings on the identification pad above the timing chain cover and forward of the intake galley pan. The thing to look for is a stamping that has HP2P or H2P2. These were the thick wall casting blocks that were used for heavier applications. Other thing to visually look at is the smooth metal surface around the camshaft bearing holes. The more even they are, the less core shift there was, meaning the casting is more even and less chance of a thinner metal during the casting process.

The edit is H2P2 or HP2P or just HP2. Big fingers and dyslexia problems.

Edited by dana44, January 21, 2005 at 12:08 pm.


#6 hemi43 (converted)

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Posted February 1, 2005 at 09:01 pm

Check the rest of the stampings on the identification pad above the timing chain cover and forward of the intake galley pan. The thing to look for is a stamping that has HP2P or H2P2. These were the thick wall casting blocks that were used for heavier applications. Other thing to visually look at is the smooth metal surface around the camshaft bearing holes. The more even they are, the less core shift there was, meaning the casting is more even and less chance of a thinner metal during the casting process.

The edit is H2P2 or HP2P or just HP2. Big fingers and dyslexia problems.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

To the best of my knowledge, the 1972 440 block was the strongest built. It had the highest nickel content, as well as a rib cast into the side of the block to prevent twisting! dan

#7 MrBelvedere (converted)

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Posted February 2, 2005 at 12:59 am

the 6 pac blocks were the better blocks to have they had more ribbing in the main area the ly rods are a good street piece and mild bracket racing the 6 pac rods are super super heavy one reason why they made the rods so heavy was so the rotating assembly would balance out due to the cast crank plus it was cheaper then adding a but load of mallory to the crank their one Heck of a strong rod but heavy the main difference in the police package was the camshaft and they used rv heads on them the rv heads cooled the around the intake and exhaust seats to keep the temps down as for the rv block ive been told that they are no better then a standard 440 block and i believe that is what the cop cars got

#8 Max62

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Posted February 13, 2005 at 06:55 pm

the 6 pac blocks were the better blocks to have they had more ribbing in the main area the ly rods are a good street piece and mild bracket racing the 6 pac rods are super super heavy one reason why they made the rods so heavy was so the rotating assembly would balance out due to the cast crank plus it was cheaper then adding a but load of mallory to the crank their one Heck of a strong rod but heavy the main difference in the police package was the camshaft and they used rv heads on them the rv heads cooled the around the intake and exhaust seats to keep the temps down as for the rv block ive been told that they are no better then a standard 440 block and i believe that is what the cop cars got

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



The 6pk block and the HP block are identical. HP2 desiginates 2nd shift.

#9 Volunteer

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Posted February 14, 2005 at 12:58 pm

The 6pk block and the HP block are identical. HP2 desiginates 2nd shift.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


That is fact number one.
Now for some more 'facts';
ALL 1974 and later (automotive) 440 cranks were cast-iron.
The 1970 to 1973 (HP) 440's ALL had steel cranks and the (-908) HEAVY connecting rods. I took apart a 1971 (Chrysler) TNT engine with these rods and also a 1973 (Ply. Roadrunner) engine; 8.5 CR. which also had these rods. FACTORY.
It's interesting to note that the first (440) six-pack engines used the 'regular' 440 con-rods.
When the compression ratios dropped in 1971, the pistons were lighter and the cranks were changed. ie. the 1970 (steel) crank and the 1973 (steel) crank are 'different'.
Although there may be some 'subtle' differences between the Six-Pack and the Magnum cams such as the actual 'valve-timing' characteristics, the main physical difference is that the Six-Pak cam required a 3-bolt cam sprocket.
By the way, when rebuilding my (TNT) engine and having it balanced, it was discovered that several (con) rods were much heavier than the majority. A LOT of metal had to be removed from (primarily) the 'big ends'. Then, an extra weight was added to a portion of the flex-plate so just about ANY (727) convertor can be used. However, the Six-Pak balancer is still required.

#10 TWX

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Posted February 21, 2005 at 01:48 pm

Second hand information for you, but I've heard that Chrysler did a good job with pretty much all of their cast cranks, so there really isn't much to be concerned with on a street car. I've also heard that the cast cranks are much less prone to transferring excessive vibration into the rest of the motor, so they don't wear the bearings nearly as quickly.


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