Things you didn’t know about Chrysler: Radar

radarAt the start of World War II, radar was very expensive and seven trailers were needed for a “portable” setup. Chrysler’s president saw that the disk could be stamped from steel, instead of slowly machined from aluminum, and brought the system size down to a single trailer. They also delivered for $9,400 per system (General Electric has set a price of $50,000) and built them well ahead of schedule, after completely redesigning the mechanical portions for higher accuracy.

Chrysler’s radar units were guided anti-aircraft/anti-rocket weapons, with air speeds of 700 mph, at distances of up to eight miles. Twenty units were deployed to stop Nazi V1 rocket-bombs on their way to London; one day, they shot 97 of 101 rocket from the sky, and over time, they had a 90% success rate. On D-Day, 39 systems prevented the Nazi air force from attacking the beach-heads.

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