Remembering Mike Sealey, cabbie and contributor

For at least six years, Mike Sealey has sent in a steady stream of corrections, additions, and articles related to Chrysler Corporation vehicles and taxis in general. Whenever we needed clarification or extra information, he was happy to provide it; and he was always interested in new information from other people. Mike was glad to volunteer his time and never asked for anything in return; he was generous with his knowledge and sought to spread it and to clarify where there was fog in our automotive niches. He seemed proud of his work as a taxi driver and knew quite a bit about taxi history, including his co-op’s competitor, DeSoto Taxi.

Mike Sealey in a rusted Chrysler

Mike Sealey was a good writer, and we never had to do much editing of his articles. Not many people combine a comprehensive knowledge of classic vehicles and good writing ability, but Mike did. In time, he would probably have joined the ranks of motorbooks writers with full length books and glossy magazine articles, but in the meantime, allpar was happy to be able to "print" what he sent.

It was a shock to hear that Mike had died, especially since he had been in the midst of a new and in-depth series on American taxicabs, and had agreed to start a blog.

He will be missed by vintage car enthusiasts across the world (we've been forwarding mail to him from as far away as New Zealand).

mike sealey Mike Sealey in his cab

A quick search found 64 references to Mike Sealey at Here are a few samples.

Gale Jorgensen, who provided the photos on this page, wrote:

I knew Mike as first a fellow car enthusiast who also posted on the Imperial mailing list. Mike realized I also had a Mac - because of the default date. This is when we started a private correspondance, off the list. At first it was just friends - we both have wicked senses of humor, wry and dry. Somewhere along the line he realized that I was a woman. Later, when the news hit the Imperial Mailing list that I was not only a woman but a single woman he thought it was a riot - and so that started the relationship.

We found we had a lot in common - Chryslers, Plymouths, Dodges, Studebakers, Virgil Exner, Brook Stevens. For me, I was amazed to meet a guy who knew the difference between and Imperial and an Impala, that Chris Crafts and tanks had Chrysler engines and most sail boats had Volvo engines - he knew that my home town was where Brooks Stevens had his studio - that Hank Aaron lived there for a time - but he was also impressed to learn that Grant Larson was my classmate - we sat next to each other in Art Class — man, what a way to a girl’s heart. He new a lot about Good Design - and as an artist that was dear to my heart.

At first neither of us wanted a long distance relationship (he lived in California and I in Minnesota), but then winter hit - and for Christmas he gave me A POWER BRAKE BOOSTER for my 1959. Then we started visiting.

When he visited me in Minnesota we went to French Lake Auto parts - this is a gorgeous beautiful parts yard located on 120 rolling acres, and it was spring in Minnesota,....... we had our tools and our picnic lunch and a blanket. When I opened the door and the Caddy was full loaded - jam packed with IMPERIAL PARTS - and so was the next and the next - I was excited!! and I only wanted to find a chrome trim part that I needed - and well maybe better seats...

We became more serious but it came down to he could not move because he wanted to be in his daughter’s life- and I also have children - so we let it be and remained very close friends. Mike is an incredibly devoted father to his daughter Katie. If anything he would want to be remembered as a good father. He was an incredible friend - and enclyopdic knowledge of all cars, some boats, literature, and baseball. A romantic, a gentleman, and now an angel in the truest sense of the word.

Mike's autobiography

Mike Sealey came home from the hospital in a 1949 DeSoto in July of 1955, and cannot remember a time in his life when he was not hugely into cars. Growing up in a MoPar family probably helped Mike develop leanings toward his favorite manufacturer, but he feels he could have gone a different way were it not for the overall excellence of the 1964 Dodge Dart 270 he had as a teenager, and the day-by-day reliability of the Coronets and Satellites he drove when first starting in the cab business in the 1970s. Today Mike drives a cab in San Francisco, where he anxiously awaits the introduction of a new generation of rear-wheel-drive Chrysler products so he can go back to a MoPar cab. He is a divorced father of two (Duane and Kaitlin), and presently owns a 1957 Plymouth Sport Suburban, a 1964 Chrysler 300-K, a 1977 Jeep Wagoneer, and an 1987 Chrysler New Yorker.

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