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EGR valve replacement guide - 3.3 and 3.8 V6 engine (minivans)

new EGR valve

Here is a how-to guide to removing and replacing the EGR valve. The vehicle is a 2004 Grand Caravan with 3.3L engine. [Editor’s note: it probably applies to any vehicle with this engine, from a wide variety of years, and to similar V6 engines in the same vehicles. We tried this with a 2006 Town & Country as well.]

I purchased the valve from my local dealership. If I could have waited, I would have bought it from moparone.com. 2013 editor’s note: Chrysler EGR valves currently sell at discounted shops for around $85; a Standard brand EGR valve sells for around $70; a cheap Chinese one, around $35.

Here is the location of the EGR valve. You need to start by unplugging the electrical connector on the top of the valve. EGR valve location
These are the first two bolts that you need to remove. They are 8mm or 5/16". EGR tube bolts
The second two bolts are behind the EGR (behind my fingers). They are 10mm bolts. To access them, you will either need a swivel or a combination of extensions (you will see what I used in a minute). block bolts
Here you can see the old, carbon filled valve with the new one. minivan 3.3 V6 engine
Installation is the reverse of removal. Here I am putting the 10mm side bolts in.

“ChryslerTech766” wrote, “Make sure to start the bolts by hand; they cross thread easily due to the tightness of the area given to work in, especially the bottom 10mm bolt.”

new block bolts
Make sure you remember to use a new gasket under the tube flange.

new tube gasket
Tighten down the flange on the tube.

new tube bolts
There you have it! Plug the connector back in and you are good to go! new EGR valve

We did the same job, with some slight differences. First, we should clarify that the red tab on the connector has to be pulled or shoved all the way over to the right before the connector can be removed; you see it locked in the last photo above, and here it is unlocked in the next photo.

instructions

As with Zach’s car, we had 8 mm bolts (visible) and 10 mm bolts (not visible). We used a quarter-inch socket wrench, starting out with a small breaker bar for extra leverage, to get the first few turns. We managed to reach the hardest-to-get bolt without interference from the alternator; with a 3/8” drive, we couldn’t do it, because the socket was ever so slightly larger. The same was true for using a deep socket instead of a small extension. There’s no spare room for the lower bolt at all. For that reason, I recommend that you start with this bolt, because if you can’t remove it, you’re not going to do anything else.

OEM valve

The old valve was made by Tata, the Indian company; it did not appear to be particularly dirty. The new one was a Standard, made in Mexico. It looked different but was a perfect fit. You can easily figure out where the bolts are by looking at the new one.

There are two gaskets that should come with the EGR valve. I didn’t know that and ordered them from RockAuto at around $1 each, from Fel-Pro (one was mis-labelled as “2002-03,” but should work up to the 2006 minivans and probably beyond). One has no up or down; the other does, so watch how the old gasket comes off. The ones in the Standard box, the Fel-Pros, and the OEM gaskets all seemed identical.

Fel-Pro gaskets

After installing the new one, don’t tighten the two main bolts too much at first — get them most of the way in, but leave them loose enough to make it easy to re-attach the EGR pipe (remembering the cardboard gasket).

You’ll need to clear the error codes before the check engine light goes off.

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