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Fixing the rear wiper arm on second generation minivans (Chrysler Town & Country, Dodge Caravan, Plymouth Voyager)

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Because it was a whole lot more difficult than I would have imagined, I would like to share how I got the rear wiper arm off my 1994 Chrysler Town & Country van [editorial note: the Dodge Caravan and Plymouth Voyager should be similar]. This procedure should only be used when the rear wiper arm is “frozen” on — when it has seized and cannot be removed with ordinary methods.

The tools you will need are:

A drill, a one-eighth-inch bit, a short piece of a one-eighth-inch bit (or equivalent), a two-leg gear puller, a wrench to turn the gear puller, anti-seize compound, and black RTV silicone. You will also need some penetrating oil.

Align the drill along the axis of the wiper drive shaft and drill through the wiper arm. There will be a small space between the arm and the end of the shaft. Squirt some penetrating oil in the hole.

Lift up the wiper arm away from the glass, and pry up the tang. This will unlock the arm and hold the tension on the spring to allow you to pull the arm off the splined drive shaft.

You need a strong, short pin to bear on the end of the motor shaft. A little piece of eighth-inch drill bit works fine.

Slip the pin into the hole.

Set up a two-leg gear puller so the flat end of the center bolt (or flat end fixture) bears on the pin. Just a couple of cranks and that impossibly frozen arm pops right off.

Before re-installing the arm, clean any corrosion from the shaft and arm and apply some anti-seize compound to prevent these parts from sticking again.

A little dab of RTV silicone in the hole will keep water out.

Wipe off the excess and you are done.

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