Supercharged-6.2 Hemi coming soon?

Months ago, sources told Allpar about a new Hemi V8 coming down the pike for SRT cars; set to debut in the SRT Barracuda, which at the time we believed was either a replacement for the Challenger or an SRT variant of the Challenger (the latter still seems likely), the “HellCat”  V8 will go up against supercharged Ford and GM powerplants.

While Chrysler has made numerous turbocharged engines — mainly 2.2 or 2.5 liter four-cylinders, but also two completely different 2.4 liter four-cylinders for SRT cars — this will be both the company’s first supercharged production engine, and their first forced-induction V8. It will reportedly include the cylinder-deactivation technology which debuted in the 5.7 Hemi and is now in the SRT 6.4 Hemi.

According to (now-defunct) Ontario Street Car, we can now expect the engine to be sold this summer, with production starting in April. The name follows aviation history, with the 392 Hemi called Apache and the variable-cam-equipped 5.7 called Eagle. The 5.7 Hemi and 6.4 Hemi are also both rumored to be getting power updates.

While most online sources are claiming 600 horsepower for the new engine, estimates of power for new mills is often grossly overstated on rumor sites, and we expect a much more modest 500-570 horsepower. That is well above the 6.4 liter V8’s 470-475 horsepower, though far less than the output of the Mustang GT500 and  Corvette ZR1, which will likely also continue to have far higher price tags.

While originally intended for an SRT Barracuda, which is now less likely to be HellCat’s debut car, the engine is also destined for the SRT versions of the Charger, Challenger, and 300C.  Rumors on the Barracuda still swirl with the original “Challenger based” reports on one hand, and the smaller D-RWD platform on the other. Some believe the next-generation Challenger will be on an eight-inch-shorter body to cut weight.

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Where are Wranglers sold?

2015 Jeep Wrangler Altitude

The Jeep Wrangler is an American staple, but it’s sold around the world. Recently, as part of a recall, FCA revealed the sales distribution of the 2016-17 Wrangler.

The great bulk of vehicles — 182,743 — were sold or distributed to the United States. Around 10% of those, 18,011, were in Canada. Accounting for around 20% of the Canadian number were 3,087 in Mexico. Finally, 20,948 were sold outside North America — a bit over 10%.

Read the full story: Where are Wranglers sold?  »

Which Rams and Jeeps will we see?

The last few days have brought numerous photos to the fore; but which will we see?

The big truck-based Wagoneer, so far as it’s based on the photos above, seems least likely, at least in that form. Looking at it after the two images were set to the same scale, you can see that the “new Jeep” is likely a design study for the Grand Cherokee — either the next or current generation.

Read the full story: Which Rams and Jeeps will we see?  »

The Renegade-influenced Wrangler

Reddit member “arcsreddit” recently shared this photo of a Renegade-fronted Jeep Wrangler was photographed, in part-size clay-model form (which looks incredibly real).  While it’s hard to criticize on its appearance, it could send the wrong message — that the Wrangler has been “Renegaded” and lost capability.

Sources have told us that the next Wrangler will be as capable as the current one, if not more so;

Read the full story: The Renegade-influenced Wrangler  »

Could we see a Chrysler SUV?

Chrysler SUV

With the Warren plant soon to be emptied of mainstream Ram production, FCA will be able to create derivatives of the popular pickups without fear of disrupting production. The question is, will they do it? If so, what will we see?

There has already been some speculation about whether the Jeep Grand Wagoneer would be based on the Grand Cherokee, as statements from Mike Manley would lead us to believe,

Read the full story: Could we see a Chrysler SUV?  »

FCA’s “22 minute” diesel defense

Harald Wester

After Volkswagen and Audi were found to have been deliberately violating emissions laws worldwide for over a decade, both Volkswagen and Germany started a hunt to validate their claim that “everyone does it.”

One result of this is a movement to have more practical tests that are harder to trick. Volkswagen, Audi, and Porsche had set up their diesel engines with “test sniffing” software. Another result was the discovery that other automakers worked within the EU law by implementing rather severe “engine protection” software (which may be one reason Fiat never brought its popular small MultiJets to the US).

Read the full story: FCA’s “22 minute” diesel defense  »

2015 Jeep Wrangler Altitude
Where are Wranglers sold?

Which Rams and Jeeps will we see?

The Renegade-influenced Wrangler
Chrysler SUV
Could we see a Chrysler SUV?

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