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Chrysler, Plymouth, and Dodge models and promotions

Rolling your own (by Graeme Ogg)

Graeme Ogg adapts existing models to recreate icons of Chrysler history.

Model Reviews by Pete Hagenbuch:

Pete Hagenbuch, not content with designing the engines and fuel systems used in the actual cars, or in being a well-known slot car performance pioneer, has written reviews of numerous models:

   

      

Painting tips (Sandy Colter) 

Most paint has a strong thinner in it which attacks the plastic. I used to use a Plasticote scratch filling primer, which was the ONLY thing that did not destroy the plastic. Once the body is primed you can use regular sray can paint over it. Be careful as if you build up the top coat too heavily it will eat through the primer with bad results.

I use spray cans. A better approach for a newbie is to buy a small air brush and spray the paint from a spay can into the airbrush jar. This way you can adjust the pressure and put the the paint on lightly. I have a friend who builds contest winning stuff, he uses lacquer over plastic with no primer. His paint is second to none!

Test out the paint on some scrap plastic from the kit you are working on. Some plastic is more sensitive to paint than others. Monogram metallic is the worst. White plastic that is milky and soft is the best (older MPC). The more brittle the plastic, the worse the paint will react to it. Clear is the most sensitive to paint (you usually don't paint clear) and the most brittle.

Promos (thanks to John M. Dean and Mike Sealey)

In strictest terms, a promo was a toy car available only at the dealer. In almost every year that there was a promo made there was also a “toy” to sell in hobby shops and toy stores; the toy usually had a different base and almost always contained a friction motor. Sometimes the promo, which almost never had a friction motor, is called a coaster. There was usually an annual kit for sale too.

One of the first plastic promos ever was a 1949 Plymouth. It was made by Aluminum Model Toys (or AMT, after aluminum was no longer the chief material). The 1949 Plymouth has a pressed metal grill with no detail, but in 1950 the grill was very accurate.

Revell made the whole Chrysler Corporation line except the DeSoto in 1961, for sale in hobby shops. The boxes had a lot of Chrysler graphics and were authorized by Chrysler. These are rare but not very valuable.

Chrysler usually used Jo-Han for its promos in the early 1960s; AMT did Imperial promos as well as Valiants, at least until 1967, and Barracuda promos and kits from 1964-66, after which MPC got the Barracuda promo contract. MPC and Jo-Han appear to have done E-body Barracudas at the same time, but that was years later.

It was not unusual for one promo manufacturer to make promos or kits that were sold under another manufacturer's name; for example, the AMT 1965 Coronets were reportedly done by MPC. The chassis of the MPC 1968 Charger appears identical to that of the AMT 1965 Coronet; MPC was doing 1965 Dodge C-body promos, their Monaco and Custom 880 convertible also being MPC's first 1/25 kits.

AMT's Barracudas were 3-in-1 kits (custom and racing alternate versions) while the Valiant Signets were part of their "Craftsman Series", snap-together models buildable out of the box as stock only. This series had no engine, unlike the 3-in-1 kits, but a skilled modeler could use a Barracuda chassis and cut the Valiant hood open to create a Valiant with an engine.

Read about Valiant models and promos

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