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06 Daytona Charger R/T

Discussion in 'Repairs, Maintenance, Help' started by Kevin R/T, Nov 24, 2017.

  1. Kevin R/T

    Kevin R/T New Member

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    Can some one tell me why my torque converter keeps cycling back and fourth. If I shift it manually it doesn't keep cycling, what can I do to fix this problem. 06 Charger R/T
     
  2. ImperialCrown

    Level III Supporter

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    Locking and unlocking? Any MDS or transmission fault codes?
    Any recent ATF+4 and filter change? Any debris on the pan bottom?
    This may need scan tool diagnosis on a road test to determine the cause of unlocking. Once locked on level roads with a steady throttle, it should stay locked. It could be engine related and not the transmission itself (NAG 1). It could even be a mis-adjusted or defective brake pedal switch.
    There was a TSB #21-003-06 where water contamination could enter the ATF on vehicles built before 12/05. It was not enough to be visible in the ATF, but the torque converter operation was the first and sometimes the only clue that this had happened.
    If it was caught early, a complete fluid flush (see TSB procedure) and filter change and dipstick tube seal replacement usually fixed it. Water could run right down the outside of the tube. The worst cases needed a torque converter replacement:
    http://www.wkjeeps.com/misc/LX/TSB_300C_Forums/TSB_2100306.pdf
     
  3. Kevin R/T

    Kevin R/T New Member

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    I just replaced the trans and the torque converter .. It is still cycling in an out. My old trans did the same thing before it went out .could it possibly the ecm?
     
  4. ImperialCrown

    Level III Supporter

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    So 2 transmissions in a row are doing the same thing right away? It probably isn't the transmission or torque converter then.
    Was the cooler flushed? If cooler flow is OK, follow the diagnostics in the service manual. An ECM wouldn't be my first guess (I think that the NAG 1 has 2 transmission controllers?).
    This needs diagnosis first. Is it setting any engine or transmission fault codes?
    NAG 1 was a good transmission, but diagnostics were not as easy as the domestic transmissions.
     
  5. Kevin R/T

    Kevin R/T New Member

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    There is no codes..
     
  6. ImperialCrown

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    Other modules may store related fault codes. If the torque converter is slipping or cycling, then the TCMs should see that and set a fault for it. So (for example) you are driving along and hear the engine speed change up and down and see the tach move up and down slightly?
    Has this been confirmed with a scan tool showing torque converter clutch state being turned on and off? Or does the state remain on and converter still cycles on and off? This can be either an electrical or hydraulic issue.
    Start with pre-diagnostics on p. 21-218 here (212 mb file):
    http://oskin.ru/pub/chrysler-dodge/manuals/Service Manuals/2006_LX_Magnum_300_300C/2006_LX.pdf
    Pre-diagnostics like fluid level check and shift cable adjustment are important before continuing.
    The ATF+4 cooler lines must be clear and have good flow. If a past transmission failure sent debris and sediment into the cooler lines and block the cooler flow, it can cause problems for the next transmission.
    Perform a TCM adaption described on p. 8E-303. Reset the TCM adaptives and road test as described.
    Hydraulic/mechanical diagnostics begin on p. 21-293. The TCC apply port can be air pressure tested to apply and release the clutch on p. 21-302. You should hear the clutch 'thump' as it applies. There should be little hiss. If there is too much hiss, that might indicate a leaky seal.
    Either something along the fluid path is worn, broken and the rubber seal has hardened from heat and isn't sealing. The valve body and the converter itself are the major components in lock-up operation.
    Electrically the TCM is a possibility, but wiring and connectors are generally more troublesome. Always diagnose first.
     

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