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1957 Nash spotted

Discussion in 'AMC, Eagle, Hudson, Nash, Willys' started by Scrounge, Jan 5, 2017.

  1. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    Driving south on I-75 through Monroe, Michigan on Tuesday, I had to detour because the freeway was closed ahead. I chose Telegraph Road (US 24), and just before crossing the Ohio state line, I saw a 1957 Nash parked on the northbound side. The paint wasn't perfect, but the body looked in good shape. This was the last model year for Nash, and the only one that used vertical headlights. I don't know if it should be credited as the first car with vertical headlights, as the '57 Lincolns also had them. I don't care for the look, but they look much better on the Nash than the Lincoln.
     
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  2. 68RT

    68RT Well-Known Member

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    And 4 headlights were not yet legal in many states that year. Laws had not caught up with reality.
     
  3. Citation84

    Citation84 Well-Known Member

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    Weren't they an option on the Lincoln that year ? They were standard equipment on the Nash.

    What a way to go out !!!
     
  4. ImperialCrown

    Level III Supporter

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    1957 was also the last of the Hudsons. :(
    The Ambassador name was passed onto Rambler.
    I remember the Metropolitans were sold under both Nash and Hudson nameplates. The Metropolitan went to Rambler.
     
  5. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    I think most of the holdouts legalized them within the model year, for sure by the end of the model year. I've seen pictures of '57 Imperials with only one headlight per side. Two of them look more natural.

    I don't know; the only ones I've seen had vertical headlights, but it's possible that the bottom ones were turn signals in states where they weren't legal yet. I probably should have specified that the Capri and Premiere models had stacked headlights. The Continentals had one headlight per side.

    The Hudsons were little different from the Nashes during their last 3 years. I personally consider the 1954 step-down models the last real Hudsons, like I personally consider the 1956 models the last real Packards. Technically, though, 1957 was the last year you could buy a new Hudson. AMC also made a Hornet during the 1970s, but I'd prefer one of the Hudson Hornets. The Metropolitan looked like a Rambler, so it stands to reason that it would still be made as a Rambler.
     
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  6. Citation84

    Citation84 Well-Known Member

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    Yes, those AMC Hudsons were known as "Hashes".

    The last years of Nash, Hudson and Packard were just outrageous styling-wise. Of those the 57 Packard, 55 and 56 Hudson and 57 Nash are my favorites.

    It's a sickness, Scrounge. "New 56 Hudson With V-Line Styling" : what's not to love ??

    I spent several hours on the Old Car Brochures site yesterday reading all the new car hype for cars of the 40s and 50s. Pure entertainment as every ordinary feature of a car had a marketing hype name. "Uni-scope" instrument cluster. "Fine Car Styling In The Low Price Field". "Weather Eye" .Stuff like that is hypnotizing.
     
  7. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    I'd have preferred that the mergers kept the original companies as separate models, but perhaps the lower sales couldn't justify the higher costs. The Hudson step-down design was about 8 years old by the 1954 models, though they could have made mild design changes while retaining the structure. Nash and Hudson were similarly priced; those in charge may have felt the makes were competing against each other anyway, so no reason to pay for separate assembly lines. At least the Nash-based Hudson wheel wells were open.

    I remember seeing "Weather Eye" plastic pieces on the tops of dashboards of some older cars. What did those things do?
     
  8. 68RT

    68RT Well-Known Member

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    Weather Eye= Heater/Air conditioning Just a brand name.
     
  9. Fast Eddie

    Fast Eddie Valued Member
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    The 57 Desotos and Chryslers and Imperials and Lincolns and Mercurys and Eldorado Broughams had quad headlights also.
     
  10. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the Weather Eye info. "Eye" seems wrong for climate control.

    The '57 Dodges and Plymouths look like they were designed for quad headlights, but the inner lights remained turn signals. I've seen pics of '57 Furys with quads, though I don't know if that's factory original or customized.
     
  11. ImperialCrown

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    The front fender headlamp 'brow' was widened to accept a headlamp pair (5¾"x2) rather than a single 7" headlamp for many of the 1956 models. This likely means that the stylists were anticipating the quad headlamps since 1954-55.
    This was the biggest lighting change since the standard 7" sealed beam was incorporated in 1940. Or since lighting went from 6 volt to 12 volt in 1955.
    My dad told me that going to quad headlamps helped the highway patrol tell for sure who was driving with their high beams on or not:
    Headlamp - Wikipedia
    The lighting standards were tightly controlled by FMVSS/CMVSS 108 until the rectangular, halogen and aero-headlamps of the '70's-'80's appeared:
    Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 108 - Wikipedia
    Some states probably had their own lighting laws that eventually had to conform to the federal laws.
    I remember the 1978-1981 Dodge St.Regis and Magnums had clear plastic headlamp covers that flipped out of the way when the headlamps turned on. The headlamps could still shine through the closed covers if they became stuck. This may have been to satisfy certain state lighting laws.
    I remember some customer concerns about the disappearing headlamp doors sticking shut from ice or other door motor failure at night. In the '60's-'70's, there was a knob on the door motor that could be turned manually to (hopefully) open the disappearing headlamp doors.
     
  12. geraldg

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    No somebody up graded or at the end of the model year they ran out of the single lights and this was common in the 50s and 60s to put parts from one year on another. How about cars having different trim on either side.
     
  13. pt006

    pt006 Active Member

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    The 57 Fords had single headlights, though it looked like it was designed for dual headlights. Which came out in 58.
     
  14. Citation84

    Citation84 Well-Known Member

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    Optional in states that would allow them. Nash's were standard taking the chance that there would be no legal problems before 50 state legislation allowing quads.

    57 Mercury Turnpike Cruiser was available in all states with quads except SD and TN. per the brochure
     
    #14 Citation84, Jan 16, 2017
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2017
  15. Citation84

    Citation84 Well-Known Member

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    #15 Citation84, Jan 16, 2017
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2017
  16. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    I also remember them. Very sharp-looking on the Magnum, and attractive on the St. Regis, too. They probably helped with wind flow.

    I like how it looks as a hardtop. Interesting that it's value has risen so much. Perhaps because of its rarity, also because of its 327 V8 engine, which I think was available well into the 1960's in some Ramblers. The one I saw is a 4-door sedan, probably worth 4 figures.
     
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  17. Citation84

    Citation84 Well-Known Member

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    Yes. My Grandmother had a 60 Ambassador wagon with 4 bbl carb. It would knock your head into the backseat when she floored it. My Mother said "I can feel the 'Gs".

    A family legend. She'd leave rubber backing out of the driveway. I think the 327 was used until 66.
     
  18. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    Nash used HydraMatic transmissions; so did Hudson. According to Wikipedia, so did other makes:

    Hydramatic - Wikipedia

    When AMC dropped the Nash and Hudson makes, did they develop their own automatic transmissions, or did they contract with someone else?
     
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  19. 68RT

    68RT Well-Known Member

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    The eagle had a 988 Torqueflite. You can go to this page and research AMC and find a lot of that type of info here at ALLPAR.

    All cars covered by Allpar
     
  20. Citation84

    Citation84 Well-Known Member

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    I think AMC used Borg Warner for their automatics after the GM Hydra, Scrounge. Right up through MY 71. 72 MY was when AMC started producing their cars via the contract with Chrysler for the Torqueflite.

    May have been earlier for Jeep. I hadn't even considered that.

    Torqueflite was used in my parent's 72 Ambassador.
     

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