NewsWhat’s special about the Demon? • Demon has a freakin’ TransBrake • Pritchett’s Challenger Drag Pak isn’t a Demon

Hello, Allpar Forums member or visitor! If you were a member, you would not see this ad!

Register or log in at the top right of the page...

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

1957 Nash spotted

Discussion in 'AMC, Eagle, Hudson, Nash, Willys' started by Scrounge, Jan 5, 2017.

  1. Scrounge

    Scrounge Member

    Likes:
    148
    I also remember them. Very sharp-looking on the Magnum, and attractive on the St. Regis, too. They probably helped with wind flow.

    I like how it looks as a hardtop. Interesting that it's value has risen so much. Perhaps because of its rarity, also because of its 327 V8 engine, which I think was available well into the 1960's in some Ramblers. The one I saw is a 4-door sedan, probably worth 4 figures.
     
    Citation84 likes this.
  2. Citation84

    Citation84 Member

    Likes:
    284
    Yes. My Grandmother had a 60 Ambassador wagon with 4 bbl carb. It would knock your head into the backseat when she floored it. My Mother said "I can feel the 'Gs".

    A family legend. She'd leave rubber backing out of the driveway. I think the 327 was used until 66.
     
  3. Scrounge

    Scrounge Member

    Likes:
    148
    Nash used HydraMatic transmissions; so did Hudson. According to Wikipedia, so did other makes:

    Hydramatic - Wikipedia

    When AMC dropped the Nash and Hudson makes, did they develop their own automatic transmissions, or did they contract with someone else?
     
    Citation84 likes this.
  4. 68RT

    68RT Active Member

    Likes:
    349
    The eagle had a 988 Torqueflite. You can go to this page and research AMC and find a lot of that type of info here at ALLPAR.

    All cars covered by Allpar
     
  5. Citation84

    Citation84 Member

    Likes:
    284
    I think AMC used Borg Warner for their automatics after the GM Hydra, Scrounge. Right up through MY 71. 72 MY was when AMC started producing their cars via the contract with Chrysler for the Torqueflite.

    May have been earlier for Jeep. I hadn't even considered that.

    Torqueflite was used in my parent's 72 Ambassador.
     
  6. Scrounge

    Scrounge Member

    Likes:
    148
    Looks like you're right, according to this:

    List of AMC Transmission Applications - Wikipedia

    Also according to it, the '57 I saw could have had a HydraMatic or a Borg Warner, but only a Borg Warner if it had a 287. That is, if it had an automatic.
     
    Citation84 likes this.
  7. Citation84

    Citation84 Member

    Likes:
    284
    I am surprised at the Hydramatic. I had no idea it was offered. Thanks
     
  8. Scrounge

    Scrounge Member

    Likes:
    148
    I think AMC could have developed a good, reliable automatic on their own, but for whatever reasons, they didn't. Perhaps reasons include lack of funds, and plenty of available alternatives.

    Note that the Packard Ultramatic was used for 2 years, I'm guessing in both the Nash and Hudson models.
     
    Citation84 likes this.
  9. Citation84

    Citation84 Member

    Likes:
    284
    The original plan seems to have been the four merging: Studebaker, Hudson, Nash and Packard. There was a deal between Packard and AMC for AMC to buy transmissions and engines and in return Packard would purchase from AMC. The deal apparently went only one way, with AMC not getting any business from Packard in return.

    Apparently that resulted in AMC developing it's own V8.

    Scrounge, I know I've got some details wrong. Especially about the specifics of the Nash/Packard deal. Getting engines and automatics from Packard makes some sense. What Packard was getting from Nash/AMC, I simply don't remember.

    Nash's George Mason was the one stumping for the 4 independents combining forces, but his death stopped the plan cold.

    I have a couple of old Motor Trends from the 50s detailing the mergers. Fascinating stuff.

    Saw a 57 Hudson Hornet at a museum a week ago. Outrageous attempt to hide the Nash underneath and one of my favorites !
     
  10. Scrounge

    Scrounge Member

    Likes:
    148
    Mason had foresight. Too bad he died when he did; had he lived another 5 years, perhaps Packard would have lived, too.

    I think Studebaker developed their own automatic transmission too, but in conjunction with Borg Warner. Studebaker and Packard had long been self-contained, and probably didn't need anything from Nash or Hudson. Of the 4, I think Studebaker was the first with their own V8 engine.

    Right, Hudson and Nash were basically different models of the same car for their last 3 years. I think the Hudsons looked better, and their front wheel wells were open, but otherwise, there was no advantage to buying one over the other.
     
    Citation84 likes this.
  11. Citation84

    Citation84 Member

    Likes:
    284
    Well, except for the "V Line Styling" of the Hudson ! ;)
     
  12. Fast Eddie

    Fast Eddie Valued Member Level III Supporter

    Likes:
    994
    The 1946 Alfa Romeo 6C is thought to be the first car with quad headlights. 1946 Alfa Romeo with quad headlights.jpg
     
    Citation84 likes this.
  13. page2171

    page2171 Member

    Likes:
    250
    [​IMG]

    Tell me I'm not the only one who sees a similarity between the Alfa Romeo and the Chrysler concept below it.
     
    Citation84 likes this.
  14. Citation84

    Citation84 Member

    Likes:
    284
    Definitely
     
  15. pt006

    pt006 Member

    Likes:
    344
    Eddie; thanks for the photo. It looks more like a 50's car than a 40's car. Ahead of their time.

    I question the quad headlight statement. As they were different diameters, they were more of a driving light? Or fog light? I'm assuming it was all 6V stuff.

    Packard had air suspension in 1956 or so.
     
    Citation84 likes this.