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1957 Nash spotted

Discussion in 'AMC, Eagle, Hudson, Nash, Willys' started by Scrounge, Jan 5, 2017.

  1. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    Looks like you're right, according to this:

    List of AMC Transmission Applications - Wikipedia

    Also according to it, the '57 I saw could have had a HydraMatic or a Borg Warner, but only a Borg Warner if it had a 287. That is, if it had an automatic.
     
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  2. Citation84

    Citation84 Well-Known Member

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    I am surprised at the Hydramatic. I had no idea it was offered. Thanks
     
  3. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    I think AMC could have developed a good, reliable automatic on their own, but for whatever reasons, they didn't. Perhaps reasons include lack of funds, and plenty of available alternatives.

    Note that the Packard Ultramatic was used for 2 years, I'm guessing in both the Nash and Hudson models.
     
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  4. Citation84

    Citation84 Well-Known Member

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    The original plan seems to have been the four merging: Studebaker, Hudson, Nash and Packard. There was a deal between Packard and AMC for AMC to buy transmissions and engines and in return Packard would purchase from AMC. The deal apparently went only one way, with AMC not getting any business from Packard in return.

    Apparently that resulted in AMC developing it's own V8.

    Scrounge, I know I've got some details wrong. Especially about the specifics of the Nash/Packard deal. Getting engines and automatics from Packard makes some sense. What Packard was getting from Nash/AMC, I simply don't remember.

    Nash's George Mason was the one stumping for the 4 independents combining forces, but his death stopped the plan cold.

    I have a couple of old Motor Trends from the 50s detailing the mergers. Fascinating stuff.

    Saw a 57 Hudson Hornet at a museum a week ago. Outrageous attempt to hide the Nash underneath and one of my favorites !
     
  5. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    Mason had foresight. Too bad he died when he did; had he lived another 5 years, perhaps Packard would have lived, too.

    I think Studebaker developed their own automatic transmission too, but in conjunction with Borg Warner. Studebaker and Packard had long been self-contained, and probably didn't need anything from Nash or Hudson. Of the 4, I think Studebaker was the first with their own V8 engine.

    Right, Hudson and Nash were basically different models of the same car for their last 3 years. I think the Hudsons looked better, and their front wheel wells were open, but otherwise, there was no advantage to buying one over the other.
     
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  6. Citation84

    Citation84 Well-Known Member

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    Well, except for the "V Line Styling" of the Hudson ! ;)
     
  7. Fast Eddie

    Fast Eddie Valued Member
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    The 1946 Alfa Romeo 6C is thought to be the first car with quad headlights. 1946 Alfa Romeo with quad headlights.jpg
     
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  8. page2171

    Level 2 Supporter

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    [​IMG]

    Tell me I'm not the only one who sees a similarity between the Alfa Romeo and the Chrysler concept below it.
     
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  9. Citation84

    Citation84 Well-Known Member

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    Definitely
     
  10. pt006

    pt006 Active Member

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    Eddie; thanks for the photo. It looks more like a 50's car than a 40's car. Ahead of their time.

    I question the quad headlight statement. As they were different diameters, they were more of a driving light? Or fog light? I'm assuming it was all 6V stuff.

    Packard had air suspension in 1956 or so.
     
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  11. Bill Watson 2

    Bill Watson 2 Member

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    Packard never had air suspension. They did have a four wheel torsion bar suspension (a bar on each side connecting front and rear wheels) with additional bars running from the rear wheels to an electric motor under the floor by the rear seat. The system had level sensors and the electric motor would kick in to wind up the bars to level the suspension when you had a trunk full of luggage or lower it when there was no load. The system was offered in 1955 and 1956.

    Studebaker's automatic was developed with the Detroit Gear Division of Borg-Warner. It was a three speed that had Low (1st) gear and Drive (2nd gear start, shift to 3rd). As well, the unit had a mechanical torque converter lock up. The transmission also had a kick down as well as their Hill-Holder that prevented the car from rolling forward or back when stopped on a hill. Studebaker used it from mid-1950 to 1955 and then switched to the Warner Gear Division transmission (Flightomatic). Hudson used Studebaker's automatic on early production 1954 models.

    GM's Hydramatic was sold to Lincoln (1949), Nash (1950), Fraser (1950), Kaiser (1951), Hudson (1951), Willys (1953) and Checker. Oldsmobile (1940), Cadillac (1941) and Pontiac (1948) also used Hydramatic. Other makes had their own automatics - Buick (Dynaflow 1948), Packard (Ultramatic - think Dynaflow with a locking torque converter - 1949½), Powerglide (think small version of Dynaflow - 1950), Ford / Mercury (Fordomatic, Mercomatic - 1951). When Willys added HM to the option list for1953, only Chrysler Corp. cars were left with no automatic transmission.

    Nash and Hudson used Packard's Ultramatic in 1955 and 1956 on the models with a Packard V8. Otherwise they used Hydramatic. In 1958 AMC switched to Borg-Warner's T-35 (Flashomatic). The 108" Rambler (Six / Rebel V8 / Classic) and the Ambassador used a push button version from 1958 to 1962, AMC switched to Torqueflite for 1972.

    Bill
    Vancouver, BC
     
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  12. dana44

    Ad-Free Member

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    Started in 1939. Have one in my Business Coupe.
     
  13. GLHS60

    GLHS60 Well-Known Member

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    Fixed it for you ;)

    Weather Eye= Heater/Air conditioning Just a brand name, for a very advanced system in its day.

    Thanks
    Randy


     
  14. ImperialCrown

    Level III Supporter

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    Studebaker had the Climatizer, a semi-automatic temperature control.
    A simple, gas-filled bellows actuated the mechanical water valve to help keep the interior temperature stable. It would close the valve as the temperature rose and open the valve as the temperature cooled.
    Back in the day, many heaters were either optional or dealer-installed. There were parts of the country (or world), where you didn't need a heater/defroster. I imagine now it has become a safety item.
     
  15. 68RT

    68RT Well-Known Member

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    The take rate became so high, it was cheaper to make standard. Same with power windows.
     
  16. pt006

    pt006 Active Member

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    Bill W. Thanks for the correct info about the Packard suspension. As a little tyke my dad brought me to a Packard dealership. The salesman in the showroom demonstrated the car raising and lowering itself. It was like star wars stuff to me. Big fancy car with lots of chrome. The salesman said the suspension made it easier to get in and out of the car. Seats were higher then.

    Packard [and others] did some amazing things back then. A completely new and different body and interior, new frame, unique and untested suspension, and a new V-8 engine to replace the old straight 8. Quite an accomplishment, and done without computers.
     
  17. 68RT

    68RT Well-Known Member

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    Packard. Also made airplane engines (including diesel) and marine engines. Some of you may know the designation : PT109 which would have been Packard powered. Good to remember on this special day.
     
  18. GLHS60

    GLHS60 Well-Known Member

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    Getting off topic but ..

    Packard developed a Diesel Engine for airplanes with a single valve per cylinder for both intake and exhaust.

    Cool history!!

    Thanks
    Randy
     
  19. ImperialCrown

    Level III Supporter

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    Single-valve aircraft engines reduced complexity and weight. Some intake valves just relied on the vacuum of a descending piston to pull it open and admit the mixture. WW1 really brought out some interesting engine developments.
    Gnome Monosoupape - Wikipedia (at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gnome_Monosoupape )
    Packard was also the first to use a steering wheel when most cars still had tillers.
    The Packard-Merlin aircraft engines were legendary:
    Packard V-1650 Merlin - Wikipedia (at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Packard_V-1650_Merlin )
     
  20. ImperialCrown

    Level III Supporter

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    Single-valve aircraft engines reduced complexity and weight. Some intake valves just relied on the vacuum of a descending piston to pull it open and admit the mixture. WW1 really brought out some interesting engine developments.
    Gnome Monosoupape - Wikipedia (at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gnome_Monosoupape )
    Packard was also the first to use a steering wheel when most cars still had tillers.
    The Packard-Merlin aircraft engines were legendary:
    Packard V-1650 Merlin - Wikipedia (at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Packard_V-1650_Merlin )
    The Packard name is still a registered trademark of the Packard Motorcar Company:
    Packard Motor Car Company :: Home (at http://www.packardmotorcar.com )
     

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