Hello, Allpar Forums member or visitor! If you were a member, you would not see this ad!

Register or log in at the top right of the page...

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

1957 Nash spotted

Discussion in 'AMC, Eagle, Hudson, Nash, Willys' started by Scrounge, Jan 5, 2017.

  1. AdminDave

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2013
    Messages:
    251
    Likes:
    196
    Posted on behalf of a member...

    '57 Nash 1.jpg '57 Nash 3.jpg
     
  2. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2009
    Messages:
    1,524
    Likes:
    240
    Thanks, Dave. Due to traffic and construction, I altered my route from Toledo to come by this intersection, and stopped to take the pics. It's at the northeast corner of Telegraph & Sterns, about 2 miles north of the Ohio border. It looks like an abandoned car near an abandoned house on an abandoned lot. Perhaps a good location for a business, but with the main roads, and the railroad crossing just behind, too noisy to live there.

    Anyway, the body looks straight, but the paint is bad, the side windows are cracked, and the interior needs restoration. Nice hubcaps. Interesting taillight treatment. The chrome surrounds dip down further than necessary. This wouldn't seem so wasteful were reverse lights inserted there.
     
  3. Citation84

    Citation84 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2003
    Messages:
    757
    Likes:
    384
    Scrounge, from the picture, the reverse lights are there. I think they were standard.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2009
    Messages:
    1,524
    Likes:
    240
    Maybe I didn't look close enough at the car. Ok, good design, then.
     
    Citation84 likes this.
  5. pt006

    pt006 Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2014
    Messages:
    1,288
    Likes:
    492
    I'm not familiar with the car, but I think it's a 1957 Nash Ambassador. Rather dated styling for that year. Compared to Chrysler products. I believe the rear vent windows actually swing out to 'catch the wind'.
     
  6. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2009
    Messages:
    1,524
    Likes:
    240
    You might notice two scripted words inside of the chrome piece on the front quarter panel. They were where the missing chrome nameplates were. The second word was Custom, but I couldn't make out the first word. However, I think every Nash for the '57 model year was an Ambassador, either Super or Custom. Research indicates that they all had the 327 V8, so this vehicle would be worth salvaging for the engine alone, if it's still there.

    The Nash was essentially the same dating back to the '52 model year; the main differences were the front and rear treatments, and available engines. For '57, the Nash front wheels had full openings for the first time since the '48 models.

    I didn't open the doors or the hood; abandoned or not, this was on private property, so I just took exterior pics and left. Was the adjustable rear vent window standard or optional?
     
    Citation84 likes this.
  7. Bill Watson 2

    Bill Watson 2 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2015
    Messages:
    8
    Likes:
    5
    Little late with this ..

    The 1955 Packard body was not new, but as with Chrysler Corp and Ford/Mercury, it was a major styling overhaul of the body used in 1954.
    - new windshield, A pillars and upper front doors
    - new front end clip with unique grilles for Packard and Clipper
    - modified rear doors on the Patrician sedan for the exterior light (came on when the front doors were opened)
    - new Packard rear quarter panels with cathedral taillamps.
    - new instrument panel and gauges
    - new bumpers, trim and other bits and pieces
    The Clipper carried over the 1954 quarters with the "sore thumb" taillamps.
    The trunk lid and roofs were carried over from 1954.

    But the new parts coupled with the unique two tone paint treatments gave the impression of a completely new body design.

    That Packard Motor Car Company in Arizona is not connected in any way to the Packard company that merged with Studebaker. In 1962 the board of Studebaker-Packard Corporation decided to drop the "Packard" from the corporate name. They knew they were never going to be able to bring back the Packard by then. After Studebaker stopped building cars and sold off their parts division, Studebaker announced that all their corporate registered names for the auto industry (Studebaker,Packard, Clipper, Cruiser, Daytona, Commander, Hawk, etc.) were now part of the public domain. The company that purchased the rights and tooling for the Avanti held the rights to the Avanti name.

    Also, the Studebaker-Packard Corporation was the Packard Motor Car Company renamed. In a merger, one company generally adopts the new company name and all stock from the other company is swapped for stock in the renamed company. With Studebaker and Packard, all Studebaker stock was swapped for Studebaker-Packard, and all assets/liabilities transferred to S-P. With that the Studebaker Corporation ceased to exit. The Studebaker Corporation (1962) (nee Packard Motor Car Company) merged with Willingdon in 1967 and became Studebaker-Willingdon Corporation.

    Looks like the Arizona Packard company built one 1999 Packard, and that was it.
     
    JA Cumbo likes this.
  8. ImperialCrown

    Level III Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2008
    Messages:
    18,232
    Likes:
    2,660
    There was no money in the coffers or from investors to retool for a new body. The Lark passenger cabin was basically the same as an early '50's Studebaker body. The front and rear were 'abbreviated' to shorten the car into a compact. Making it into a pillar-less 2-dr hardtop was the biggest change they made.
    My '62 Lark body plate still says Studebaker-Packard.
    The Avanti used the basic Lark frame with the addition of an 'X' brace for stiffening.
    Brooks Stevens did wonders with the old structure to modernize into the new cars.
    Gear Head Tuesday – Designer Brooks Stevens (at https://56packardman.com/2016/04/05/gear-head-tuesday-designer-brooks-stevens/ )
    He made the Hawk into the Sceptre which might have turned heads, but was too late for the company and it still used a lot of the old structure:
    https://www.hemmings.com/blog/index...oks-stevenss-radical-plan-to-save-studebaker/
    He also did the 1963 Jeep Wagoneer, the first practical SUV? My dad bought one as a family wagon.
    The big 3 could undercut anything done by the smaller car manufacturers. AMC lasted awhile longer.
    Studebaker-Worthington was the new company:
    Studebaker-Worthington - Wikipedia (at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Studebaker-Worthington )
     
    JA Cumbo likes this.
  9. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2009
    Messages:
    1,524
    Likes:
    240
    A few Studebaker names eventually became Mopar models; the Dodge Daytona, the Jeep Commander, and the Chrysler PT Cruiser. Studebaker also made a Wagonaire station wagon, introduced about the same time as the Jeep Wagoneer.
     
  10. ImperialCrown

    Level III Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2008
    Messages:
    18,232
    Likes:
    2,660
    The light-duty pick up truck was called the Champ, like our Mitsubishi Plymouth version of the Colt.
     

Share This Page

Loading...