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2.0 Magnum replacement?

Discussion in 'Neon' started by Dan Phillips, Jun 1, 2016.

  1. Dan Phillips

    Dan Phillips Active Member

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    Hi,

    I'm picking up a 2004 Neon RT with the magnum for $800. Timing belt out. Don't know what I'll find when I tear it apart. If it is excessively bad, are there any direct bolt on junkyard replacement engines (non RT)? I'm buying it for a daily beater, not a racecar.

    Thanks,

    Dan
     
  2. valiant67

    valiant67 Rich Corinthian Leather
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    Most times the damage is limited to the head.
    You can't swap to a non-R/T (non-Magnum) engine without changing other things like the engine computer.
     
  3. t vago

    t vago Active Member

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    The internal differences between a 2.0 and a 2.0 Magnum consisted of the camshaft itself and the valve springs. You can bolt on the 2.0 Magnum-specific external parts, as they are the exhaust and intake manifolds. If you leave the camshaft and valve springs alone on a junkyard engine, and bolt up the Magnum's intake and exhaust manifolds, you'll end up with a 2.0 engine that has more output than a stock 2.0, but less than that of a 2.0 Magnum.

    Edit: In fact, you pretty much have to use the 2.0 Magnum exhaust manifold, since it has slightly different dimensions than the stock 2.0 exhaust manifold. If you use the stock 2.0 exhaust manifold, you'll have to have some welding done to your exhaust system to accommodate the stock exhaust manifold. IIRC, it had something to do with the placement of the pre-cat O2 sensor on both the stock and the Magnum exhaust manifolds.
     
  4. Dan Phillips

    Dan Phillips Active Member

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    TVago, thanks. So basically it is a different camshaft?

    Thanks
     
  5. ImperialCrown

    Level III Supporter

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    It may have just bent some valves and not in every cylinder either. It should still be perfectly serviceable.
    With the rockers out, turn the head upside down and see which combustion chambers hold water and which ones don't. On the ones that don't, see if the water is leaking from the intake or exhaust ports.
    Most heads I have done from belt breakage have had some intake valves bent.
    I think that the regular 2.0L is a 'C' in the VIN (8th position) and the Magnum is an 'F'.
    Replace the water pump and idler/tensioner pulleys at the same time you do the belt.
     
  6. Dan Phillips

    Dan Phillips Active Member

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    Thanks IC. How many miles are reasonable to expect from the 2.0? This one has 99k on it.
     
  7. ImperialCrown

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    Hard to say. You need to get it running first to assess any possible funny noises. Neon drivetrains are fairly durable. By 2004, the 2.0L had pretty much any bugs worked out of it.
    Up here in salt belt NY, the bodies rusted out long before the engine wore out or got noisy.
     
  8. Dan Phillips

    Dan Phillips Active Member

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    I might just yank it and replace the clutch and do a shadetree mechanics rebuild (rings and bearings) if it will save me work in the long run.
     
  9. ImperialCrown

    Level III Supporter

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    A stick-shift sounds like fun for a 'daily-beater'. I would change the transaxle fluid as it probably has never been changed. If it is the New Venture T-350, Mopar has a special fluid for that. It takes slightly more than a quart.
    MTX00.jpg
    It may be a good idea to flush the coolant, P/S and brake fluids until they run clean. Additives wear out and brake fluid deteriorates. Fresh fluids will help durability.
     

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