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2001 Grand Cherokee Ltd, driver seat 'base' broken

Discussion in 'Grand Cherokee, Durango, etc' started by jstew314, Feb 9, 2017.

  1. jstew314

    jstew314 Well-Known Member

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    The seat framework under the driver seat is broken. The vehicle is driveable, but somewhat loose. Report to me is that original owner (college linebacker) used to arch to adjust shorts after getting into the driver seat and one time something snapped. The seat angles back maybe 10 degrees from where it should be

    Does the whole seat have to be replaced or is there a seat base which can be changed? Or can the seat be aligned and welded? This is a leather seat with heater, electric adjustment.
     
  2. jstew314

    jstew314 Well-Known Member

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    Just checked on the vehicle and I 'popped' the seat back into place. I took a picture which I will attach later. The break is in the tubular member which adjusts the angle of the seat base. The tube is snapped at the inboard end of where a plastic sleeve is.

    Looks like a rod could be inserted into this hollow tube to keep it in place. But I don't know if the outer part of the tube is supposed to rotate with the inner part. Probably is but if I push in a rod and it connects the outer part with the inner then it will have to rotate or will jam.
     
  3. jstew314

    jstew314 Well-Known Member

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    Picture of area where tube is broken imgur.com/a/BW24E. [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    I tried to wire the broken end of the tube with a bicycle spoke (visible in picture) but that didn't hold it in place. I now think I could insert a rod into the tube from the door side. Would that work?
     
    #3 jstew314, Feb 9, 2017
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2017
  4. ImperialCrown

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    At the dealer level, we always just replaced the seat adjuster instead of trying to repair it. Liability would be heavy if it broke again causing an injury or crash. Broken seat frames are not safe and there have been recalls.
    A weld would weaken the surrounding metal.
    A used WJ seat may be an option. The price of these when new is high.
    For lt power seat w/o memory use Mopar part # 5015571AB. For an adjuster w/memory use Mopar part # 5015569AB.
     
  5. jstew314

    jstew314 Well-Known Member

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    I can understand that a dealer would only replace the part. I take your point about welding and am not considering that. But if a rod would keep the tube in place and not be any less safe than driving it as is (I think it would a lot safer), then I would like to know if the outer part of the tube is supposed to be connected to the inner or to rotate with it.
     
  6. jstew314

    jstew314 Well-Known Member

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  7. jstew314

    jstew314 Well-Known Member

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    I drilled a 1/2" hole in the plastic cover (at right in the picture above) on the outboard driver side and inserted an 8" long steel spike (5/16" or 3/8" diameter) into the tube which was broken. It is holding it in alignment and supporting the seat adjuster.

    I think this repair will last indefinitely given the light use this vehicle gets. I really do like to make an optimal repair which I think would be a threaded rod (5/16" x 15" or 16") with washers and nuts on both ends, but I didn't have one on hand, and complications could arise that I don't foresee. I pressed in the spike with a flat blade screwdriver--I did not have to tap with a hammer--so it shouldn't be distorting the tube in the center. I left the stainless steel spoke in place. The end of the spoke is bent into the interior of the tube and this is providing some friction which is serving to keep the spike from rattling.
     
    #7 jstew314, Feb 11, 2017
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2017
  8. 2012srtchallenger

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    Have gone to junk yard in the past and picked up whole seat,not hard to swap upholstery.have to get power or manual and swap rest from old seat
     
  9. jstew314

    jstew314 Well-Known Member

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    When you see a used 'seat' advertised does that include the adjuster? That is, does it include what I thought would be called the base, ready to bolt into the floor pan?
     
  10. jstew314

    jstew314 Well-Known Member

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    In a front impact it is the seat belts that are loaded and they are anchored to the floor. I think this may be true of a side impact.

    But in the case of a rear impact collision I don't have any confidence in the ability of a fully functioning occupied front seat of a Jeep of early 2000s manufacture or earlier to protect the occupant or someone sitting directly behind. From what I have read and my own limited observations while working 16 years ago as a motor vehicle crash researcher, the weak point in auto front seats is the connection of the seat back to the seat bottom. Obviously the heavier the occupant and the higher his center of gravity, the higher will be the loading of the seat back.

    Given that a 10 g or even 20 g instantaneous acceleration of the vehicle is to be expected in a hard rear end collision, failures of the seat backs are expected and are widely reported. For example, see Front Seat Failure, Back Seat Disaster. In the 1990s I personally observed (at a dealership) the removal of the foam cushioning from the rear back seat of a crew cab pickup that had been rear ended. The metal mesh had a bowl shaped depression from the impact with the driver's head.

    My point is that I sincerely do not believe that this particular repair of this Jeep seat adjuster makes the vehicle any less safe.
     
    #10 jstew314, Feb 13, 2017
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2017
  11. 2012srtchallenger

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    yes the used seat is ready to bolt in vehicle,if your lucky you could find matching seat with no change over.i have seen many with this problem so looka t seat before you buy.
     

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