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2004 Sebring 2.7 L Heater goes cold at idle

Discussion in '1995-2017 FWD Sedans, Coupes' started by dalexop, Jan 29, 2019.

  1. dalexop

    dalexop Active Member

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    Hi folks,

    The bring throws heat when driving, however goes cold when idling at a light.
    A small amount of heat comes out if I raise the revs while idling.

    She is now at 364,000 KM.

    There are a few possibilities, has anyone come across this symptom?

    Thanks
     
  2. Doug D

    Doug D Virginia Gentleman

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    First thing to check is coolant level. Low coolant level can be the cause of the symptoms the vehicle is displaying.
     
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  3. Gerry G

    Gerry G Well-Known Member

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    Agree with Doug D, there is a tendency for the bleeder housing to leak. If the coolant level is good, I have found setting the blower fan at 2 keeps the heat blowing ( i have an '04 vert)
     
  4. ImperialCrown

    ImperialCrown Moderator
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    Is the thermostat OK? Some bleed holes drilled into them are larger than they have to be and this can reduce engine temperature.
    It is kind of a band-aid, but there were auxiliary electric water pumps used to boost heater core flow in the Aspens/Durango trucks and Crossfires from the factory.
    http://www.4s.com/media/4363591/Auxiliary-Pump_Intro_Flyer.pdf
    Your core may have a corrosion or debris restriction that is causing poor heat transfer at idle. A pump could be spliced into an existing heater hose (note correct flow direction) and a switch added for a boost to winter heating.
    I see cars with the cardboard in front of the radiator, especially with the polar vortex snap we had. Dress warmly and keep the glass clear.
     
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  5. andybuzz2u

    andybuzz2u Active Member

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    Do a cooling system flush by either you or someone you trust. Make sure to remove the hoses and flush out the heater core directly. Most likely scale has built up in the heater core impeding water flow while at idle.
     
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  6. dalexop

    dalexop Active Member

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    Funny, I thought about that while driving home shortly after posting this. Indeed the coolant was low, I topped it up, with no change in symptoms.
     
  7. dalexop

    dalexop Active Member

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    I think this is my next step in the troubleshooting path. I assume that the water pump creates pressure in relation to the engine revs ? That would explain why it gets warmer instantly when I throttle up.
    Is that really the case ?
     
  8. Doug D

    Doug D Virginia Gentleman

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    When the engine revs higher than idle it creates more heat and pressure so it is logical you would get more heat when the engine is revved up. If the coolant is normal and the heat output is still relatively cool, I would suspect a clogged or partially clogged heater core. Back flushing the heater core would be a good idea. Swap the hoses and flush the system with a product such as SuperFlush. I've had good success with it.
     
  9. FlaOkie

    FlaOkie Member

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    The water pump is an “open impeller” design.
    An “open impeller” design does not develop much pressure but moves a large volume of coolant.
    There is a restriction somewhere in the cooling system limiting the flow rate.

    I agree that it is most likely a partially plugged heater core
     

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