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2011 Compass A/C Condenser

Discussion in 'Compacts: Renegade, Patriot, Compass, Caliber' started by bguy, Aug 14, 2019.

  1. bguy

    bguy Well-Known Member

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    The condenser in our Compass was apparently busted by a large stone. I found a good replacement in a Caliber ( it still had charge in the system ). I have it installed and it's working but the 2011 has a " cannister" on one end that's not removable. Can anyone tell me what it is and is it important?
     
  2. ImperialCrown

    ImperialCrown Moderator
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    The canister is likely an 'accumulator' to hold extra refrigerant in 'storage' until the system requires it as the cooling load changes. It may contain a filter and desiccant?
     
  3. AllanC

    AllanC Well-Known Member

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    I agree with the assessment made by I C. I looked at RockAuto and found replacement condenser for your Compass. Some units have a receiver /drier attached to the condenser while others do not. I have seen some GM vehicles use a condenser with an attached drier / dehydrator. Other than increasing the refrigerant requirement by a few ounces, I would think extra desiccant material would not cause any problems. Maybe this relocation of the drier solves a plumbing issue as underhood space is always a challenge in front wheel drive vehicles???
     
  4. bguy

    bguy Well-Known Member

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    So having lost an unknown quantity of AT fluid I have been ever since intending to check the level. I see it requires a special tool # 9336. Is there a shade tree method to check it?
     
  5. AllanC

    AllanC Well-Known Member

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    It would be helpful to know the year, make, vehicle model, and transmission type (CVT, conventional automatic, etc) to give a correct answer.
     
  6. ImperialCrown

    ImperialCrown Moderator
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    I have used a length of flexible generic speedometer cable. They used to be found in the HELP! section at auto parts stores. You can mark mm or inches with white paint marks.
    [​IMG]
    Then look up the approximate level and temperature chart for your application.
    If the cooler hoses and outside of your transaxle are dry, the level is probably OK.
    See here:

    https://images.oreillyauto.com/parts/img/documents/mtm/917-327instr.pdf
     
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  7. AllanC

    AllanC Well-Known Member

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    Another "poor boy" approach if you are really "tight and squeezy" with your money is to use the engine oil level dipstick. Wipe it clean and insert into the transmission fill tube. It should be flexible enough to make the necessary bends and twist. Only downside to this idea is that it may be too short to reach the bottom of the transmission pan.

    The instructions link that I C provided mentions using a scan tool to accurately determine transmission fluid temperature. This is important because fluid expands as temperature increases. If you do not have a scan tool that will read transmission fluid temperature you can attach a dial type thermometer with metal probe to the underneath side of the pan. You can place insulating material around the probe so the device will sense the temperature of the pan metal and give a fairly accurate reading of the actual fluid temperature. Temperature of the fluid will probably be a few ( 5 - 8 deg F) degrees higher but it will get you some data to make an accurate fluid level check.

    I believe some of the ZF 8 and 9 speed transmissions that are in Chrysler vehicles use a plastic transmission pan. These would make it more difficult to get an accurate transmission fluid temperature by my method.
     
  8. ImperialCrown

    ImperialCrown Moderator
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    I purchased an IR laser-aim thermometer from Harbor Freight.
    I have used to find hot spots and cold spots on radiators and around the house.
     
  9. bguy

    bguy Well-Known Member

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    Sorry Allan, it's a 2011 Compass 4x4 2.4/CVT.
    I was thinking of the trans dipstick for a B van but this may be easier to come up with.
     
  10. AllanC

    AllanC Well-Known Member

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    Vehicle identification helps. Here is a link to a Y T video that checks the fluid level on a Jeep Compass CVT transmission.


    View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2wbVUw7616A


    From the video it appears the transmission fill tube is no longer than the engine oil dipstick. I think you could use the engine oil dipstick in the transmission filler opening to check the fluid level.
     
  11. ImperialCrown

    ImperialCrown Moderator
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    There are some different CVT fluids out there. You want the CVTF+4 saying that it meets Chrysler MS-12106 on the label.
     

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