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2012 Chrysler300 s tires

Discussion in 'Challenger, 300, Magnum, Charger' started by limechallenger, May 2, 2017.

  1. MPE426HEMI

    MPE426HEMI Well-Known Member

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    As Bob Lincoln mentioned before, always check the date code. I believe the exception is a year, any more than that and there's an obligation for the selling outlet to take a return on them. For those that don't know, the date code is located on both sides of the tire side walls, on the same line as the "DOT" marking. It's encircled and has four digits, the first two being the week of the year and the last two being the year of manufacture. Eg. (2704) This tire was manufactured on the 27th week of 2004.
    IMG_2947.jpg
    There's been more than one person sold NOS tires. Be an informed consumer. If you're into buying used tires, which is common in my area, be especially careful. If you are buying new tires for a daily driver, it's likely that they'll be spent before they become out dated. However, if you are buying tires for a stored vehicle/weekend driver or a motorcycle, tire dates are critical on purchase because you probably will be keeping them for the full duration. If I buy motorcycle tires online, I always add a note to inform that if they ship me tires that are more than a year old, I will be returning them. I hope this info helps.
     
    #21 MPE426HEMI, May 13, 2017
    Last edited: May 13, 2017
    somber likes this.
  2. Hemidakota

    Hemidakota Active Member

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    I had used Yokohama. The reasoning is the high strength on the sidewalls (better corning since it is heavy car and issues with horizontal roles). I am now on my 2nd sets of tires. I can say, between them and the Michelins are the best tires out there for this car.
     
  3. AHBGuru

    AHBGuru Active Member

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    Tires, compounds, and tread change with size and intended application. There is a lot of variability in aftermarket/replacement tires. Chrysler used to be very picky about tires, but now it appears that only performance models and police vehicles get tires specfic to their respective application. For those cars, which would likely start with the R/T Track-pak, all SRT, and the Charger Pursuit, the tires should be replaced with what they originally came with. For example: if you have a Charger Pursuit, you'd use the Eagle RSA or the Eagle UltraGrip.

    If you're running an SRT in winter with the 18" steel Pursuit rims, you run 4 snow tires, not 2, even if you have an AWD Charger or Challenger. All-Season tires, or All-Season "M&S" are not snow tires. Make certain your overall diameter is the same as OEM, and same all around, unless it came with staggered sizes. Narrow is best in rain and snow.

    I've been running Goodyear in every Mopar since I was fairly young. They've given me the best service, with only one flat in 32 years of driving. The Michelin is also very good, as are high-end Firestone, but they are horribly expensive and offer no true advantage for my use of the Goodyear.

    I actually wish Goodyear still made the Eagle GT+4 and F32 snow tires.

    I've also run the Cooper, MasterCraft, and General. I would never use any of those kinds of lesser quality tires on any vehicle capable of double the interstate speed limits. In fact, both the Michigan State Police and California Highway Patrol found the "off-brands" to be quite horrible in their respective tire tests. Certain Pirelli and even a Nokian did quite well, however.

    If you've got any 300 (except SRT), Charger SE/SXT/GT/RT, or Challenger SE/SXT/GT, then pretty much any:

    - Goodyear (Dunlop, Kelly, Douglas)

    - Michelin (BFG, Riken, Uniroyal)

    - Bridgestone (Firestone, Fuzion)

    - Continental

    - Pirelli
     
  4. ImperialCrown

    Level III Supporter

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    I think if you ask about 'best' tire brands, you will get many different answers. 'Best' being able to mount and balance and forget about them for their lifetime. Of course maintenance like periodic rotations and pressure checks are necessary.
    I haven't had particularly good luck and am not impressed with Good Years after working at the dealer for 30 years. They were a big, arrogant company that really could care less about your tire pull, shake or shimmy. They might make 'adjustments' toward a new tire.
    OTOH, the smaller tire companies are the underdogs. They have a vested interest in your satisfaction and will bend over backwards if you have an issue besides normal treadwear.
    After the Explorer/Firestone debacle, I purchased a set of Firestone Firehawks that I had no problem with. Firestone had less lawyers than Ford and got a bum deal.
    Some Continentals on the 300C AWD wore out in 12K miles.
    Michelin is good, but overpriced.
    Chinese and Korean tires are getting better quality.
    I have found that some obscure European tires ride hard and wear quickly.
    Everyone's tire experiences vary widely. Because of this, I won't recommend a tire brand as invariably, I will be wrong.
     
    AHBGuru likes this.
  5. AHBGuru

    AHBGuru Active Member

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    I'd have to agree in principle with IC. Goodyear has had quality issues with the Eagle RSA police tires (flat-spotting).
    That has since been resolved, and I've also had very good luck with the Firehawk series, but they're double the price of the overpriced Goodyear.

    I think tires are probably getting to be like the vehicles they go onto - most are very good, overall, but there can be a lemon here or there that spoils a customer's experience.

    Probably the best thing to do is find the correct tire (and size) for a given vehicle, and then find the best price. If you need snow tires, get 4 snow tires. Pre-season is when prices are relatively sane.
     
    ImperialCrown likes this.
  6. Tomguy

    Level 2 Supporter

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    I don't mind Michelin tires, but there are two issues that I have with them OTHER than their typically-higher price tag:
    1) They aren't good in snow. No Michelin I've ever had was good in the snow. Decent, maybe. The Michelins on my Grand were terrible, the Bridgestones I have on it now are much better - in the rain, and in the snow. MAYBE slightly more highway noise? Better handling though.
    2) They will need replacing within 3-5 years of purchase. I've never had a Michelin tire that HASN'T had sidewalls crack after 5 years. Most sooner. And I'm talking 3 sets. I bought a used set for my 300M, that were almost new, in 2011 (10/32" tread and 0211 date code); I replaced all 4 in 2014 due to sidewall cracking. With 4-6/32" left on each tire. On my Jeep, with 24k miles, the OEM Michelins weren't just bald, but starting to crack. That was in three years as well. Third set came pre-mounted on used Charger wheels I picked up, they were 4 years old and had the Michelin dryrot.

    Google "Michelin Dryrot" if you don't believe it!
     
  7. AHBGuru

    AHBGuru Active Member

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    Interesting to learn about this. For what they charge, it seems hard to justify the investment.
     
  8. Doug D

    Doug D Virginia Gentleman

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    FWIW - my '06 Ram 1500 came with Michelins when I bought it new. Never had a dry rot problem with them and I logged 111K miles before replacing them. Guess I was lucky. Since then I have had Firestone Destination LE's and Primewell's. It's due for another set of tires. This will be the 4th set.
     
  9. Tomguy

    Level 2 Supporter

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    The dryrot seems to be around 2011 and on. Maybe a year or two earlier. I haven't had any dryrot issues on other tires from known brands including Bridgestone, Firestone, Nokian, and even Goodyear. I have a set of Yokohamas that are terrible but they're also 7 years old now so I can't say it's not age. Though the Nokians I had that were fine were SNOW TIRES that were OVER TEN years old!
     
  10. MPE426HEMI

    MPE426HEMI Well-Known Member

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    It's true, everyone has their own opinion about tires and not two drivers situations are typical. I used to always run Goodyears up until the mid 90's. For what I paid for them, they never lasted, so I stopped buying them. I've bought some in house, big box store mass production tires and some seemed ok and others were just junk. The past few years I've been running General Altimax Arctic (snow) & RT43 tires and they've held up pretty good and give decent traction for the money. They are in the "mid-cheap" range of pricing. Definitely will buy them again for my daily drivers. If anyone is looking for tires for an SRT vehicle, I'm sure you have the cash to buy the better performance tires, so go that route. Don't get cheap now.
     
  11. valiant67

    valiant67 Rich Corinthian Leather
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    The same Firestone tire that was crap in the 20" size on my 300s and Challenger was very good in the 15" (not exactly sure, maybe 16") size on my 500c. Treads looked identical, but the 20" was noisy, less than ideal in rain and seemed to flat spot. The smaller tire had none of those issues.
     

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