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56 Poly 277 Push Rods

Discussion in 'All other classic cars' started by oldhotrodder, Oct 13, 2020.

  1. oldhotrodder

    oldhotrodder New Member

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    I have a bent pushrod that I can't seem to get straightened. Are there replacements available?
     
  2. 68RT

    68RT Well-Known Member

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    Found quite a few by googling 56 plymouth Belvidere 277
     
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  3. GLHS60

    GLHS60 Well-Known Member

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    You probably know this but Plymouth had 2 Hyfire V8's in 1956.

    The 277 was the Plymouth A series Engine that went on to become the 318.

    Pushrods appear to remain the same until 1966-67

    Similar, but totally different from the earlier Dodge 1956 270 Hyfire V8.

    The Dodge Engine is easily identified by its separate valley cover and intake.

    The Plymouth A series Engine had an intake that is also the valley cover.

    Plymouth's version went on to power all Chrysler Corp. cars and trucks.

    It evolved from the A series to the LA and Magnum and others.

    The Dodge version was dropped completely around 1959.

    Dodge pushrods seem to be available at Kanter Auto Products for $11.85 each.

    Thanks
    Randy



     
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  4. 68RT

    68RT Well-Known Member

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    Chrysler Corp had quite a few various engines in that era. Financially not the best idea. A few years later they became fewer design and cubic inch variables. A singe displacement could cover multiple divisions. Had to save a lot of development and inventory issues. Still had various horsepower ratings available but all within a common family.
     
  5. GLHS60

    GLHS60 Well-Known Member

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    I always thought the opposite.

    They tried several designs and fine tuned their offerings.

    3 Hemi family's and 3 Poly family's that evolved into the A and B.

    The B lived a very useful life, even as a Hemi, but was finally put to pasture.

    The A, the Plymouth Poly, proved best and evolved into a wedge and then even a Hemi!

    With several sizes and even V6 and V10 variants and now multiple Hemi's.

    At GM they had Cadillac, Chevrolet, Buick, GMC, Olds and Pontiac Engines.

    All distinctly different at first and each evolving differently throughout the years.

    They all had unique features but the Chevy prevailed for a while and then the GM LS.

    Many lessons were learned along the way concerning everything.

    Everything changed, cost, durability, the market, EPA, etc, etc.

    As with everything, hindsight vision is about 20-20.

    Then changes again.

    Thanks
    Randy
     
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  6. 71Charger_fan

    71Charger_fan Well-Known Member

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    I've been fortunate. I have had a lot of different Chrysler engines over the years and the only problem I have ever had with any of them was a bent pushrod in my 400 at the dragstrip.

    I've had flathead 6's, a slant 6, an A engine 326, several LA 318's, a 383 B engine, a 400, three 3.7 V6, a 3.8 V6, three 3.6 V6, four 4.0 straight sixes, a 5.7 hemi, 6.1 hemi, 6.4 hemi, 2.2 NA, 2.2 Turbo I, 2.2 Turbo II, 2.5 NA, a 2.5 Jeep, three 2.0 Neon engines including my current HO. I am probably forgetting something.
     
  7. 68RT

    68RT Well-Known Member

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    My experience has been very good too except for one failure. Broke a rod on my 440 doing 30mph in 3rd. Called dealer and told them that and you could feel the laugh at the other end. They towed it in and 2 days later it was done. Replaced the rod and bearing nd put back together. No internal damage at all. They believed me then.
     

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