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63 - 64 Chrysler

Discussion in 'Other classic cars' started by saltydog, Jan 28, 2015.

  1. saltydog

    saltydog Well-Known Member

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    Still working on the timing issue, which maybe affecting the fuel mileage.

    In regards to the timing, at low RPM's the ignition timing is fluctuating, higher RPM's and she is fine. So it has been very difficult to get the timing just right. I am thinking there is something not right with the distributor.

    Yesterday the Voltage regulator died...again! New parts these days just don't last! So my we took on off the shelf from the 66' Chrysler we had and it worked like charm.
     
  2. geraldg

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    Have you checked the timing chain. They can get slop in them and cause erratic readings, I know I had it happen. They are not to bad to change.
     
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  3. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    When buying electrical parts, try to avoid those made in China. I recently replaced the headlight switch on my Dakota with a new one with a one-year warranty that was made in China. It started flickering almost immediately, so I exchanged it with another one that started flickering after about a week. When I exchanged it, the store was out of the one-year part, so they exchanged it for a lifetime part that was made in Taiwan, no extra charge. So far, so good. Years ago on a D100, I had a similar experience with an ignition module. Those made in China refused to work; when I bought one made in Mexico, it lasted me until I sold the truck.

    Like Gerald, I'd suspect the timing chain before the distributor. Did you replace them both?
     
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  4. saltydog

    saltydog Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for the lead, going to take a look at the Timing Chain. The motor was rebuilt by PO so I have not seen inside the engine. From what I can tell, the engine was rebuilt, but one never knows what others have done or if it was done correctly.
     
  5. geraldg

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    A easy way to check if you have slop in the chain, is to remove the dist cap and with a remote starter turn the engine over and watch the crankshaft pulley and the dist rotor they should move at the same time but do a complete rotation because teeth could be missing , if the pulley moves and the dist doesn't you have slop in the chain. My car had plastic teeth on it and some where broken off replaced with a steel one it was louder but better. Depends what they replaced and may have never looked at the chain.
     
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  6. saltydog

    saltydog Well-Known Member

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    It has been so hot lately that I have not done a whole lot to the car. She gets driven once in while to keep the battery up.

    On a side note, I was able to connect with a gent that has all the trim I need for my car, so we did part swap, he wanted an old powerflite that we had. I love deals like this!
     
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  7. saltydog

    saltydog Well-Known Member

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    So first time car has been out in while and boy this thing does not like the 105 degree weather....damn thing keeps overheating. Ugh. Not sure what else I can do. This what I have done: radiator has been boiled and resealed, engine block was flushed out by taking the freeze plugs out, new thermostat, new water pump, new 5 blade flex fan.

    I guess it needs a bigger radiator? Also it gets hotter while it's on the highway, which is very interesting to me.

    On a side note, I always had issues with my valiant(s) with overheating in the hot weather. Are these old Mopars just not built to deal with this kind of heat? When it's cooler, no issues.
     
  8. dana44

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    Yeah, I hate it when this happens. Making sure there is a tight seal between the radiator support and the radiator can help, fan shroud, probably a 16spi radiator cap with an overflow catch can, making sure the timing doesn't advance above 36degrees minus vacuum advance, and verifying the carb isn't running lean at higher cruise rpm (this is usually a long cruise on the highway temp increaser of all). Have to stick it on a tailpipe gas analyzer and see what it is at cruise rpm to verify that without guessing. This is especially true if the temp goes down in town or slower speeds.
     
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  9. geraldg

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    I think part of your problem is the flex fan, I have owned a bunch of these and never had a problem with over heating and this is in Az. Also a fan shroud would help. Also what temp thermostat did you use.
     
    #249 geraldg, Aug 20, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2017
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  10. pt006

    pt006 Active Member

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    What happens on some of the older Mopar radiators is a mineral build up on the tubes. If you look into the radiator you might see deposits at the ends of the tubes if it has vertical tubes. No chemical that I know of will dissolve it. Rodding it out might work. Or a recore. A new radiator might be cheaper.
     
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  11. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    I've had the same problem with old big-block Mopars. Have you flushed the heater core? If not, some of those deposits might have clogged the radiator.
     
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  12. saltydog

    saltydog Well-Known Member

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    The stat is a 195 degree, as for radiator cap, I need to check.

    Going to check the timing, as once it got hot is was pining pretty bad, so am guessing the timing is off.

    At this time the heater core is bypassed, as I don't know it's condition.
     
  13. geraldg

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    Also check the stat to make sure it is operating the right way.
     
  14. saltydog

    saltydog Well-Known Member

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    Will do.

    Drove it today and it was 95 degrees and no issues. Crazy how 10 degrees can make such a difference.
     
  15. pt006

    pt006 Active Member

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    Sounds like your radiator is just barely doing its job. A 180 degree thermostat might give you an extra 10 minutes of highway time at 105 outside temperature. This might get you to next spring?
     
  16. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    Your thermostat might be wrong. Most part store sites sell a 160-degree thermostat as a replacement. What does your owner's manual say?
     
  17. valiant67

    valiant67 Rich Corinthian Leather
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    All the cooler thermostat temperature is really going to do is change the timing before you overheat if the radiator can't expel more heat than the engine generates.
    It looks like the original thermostat was 180º.
     
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  18. valiant67

    valiant67 Rich Corinthian Leather
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    Another cooling item to look for is the pressure rating of the cap. The spec is 14 psi, 16 psi with air conditioning.
    If the system can't hold pressure, it will boil over at a lower temperature. This is where a cooling system pressure tester is a great tool, both to test the cap and the cooling system.
     
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  19. saltydog

    saltydog Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, I don't have a owners manual so this helpful.
     
  20. geraldg

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    Also they sell at the parts stores what I think is called water wetter which is suppose to keep the engine 20 * cooler.
     

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