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77 Volare head light problem

Discussion in 'F-J-M: Volare, Diplomat, etc, 1977-89' started by thebrownbomber, Sep 20, 2016.

  1. thebrownbomber

    thebrownbomber New Member

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    My head lights won't turn on. Anyone have any ideas whether it might be the dash switch or possibly the hi-low beam foot switch? All the other lights work fine.
     
  2. valiant67

    valiant67 Rich Corinthian Leather
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    Could be either, both are subject to failure at that age. I am sure there are other points of failure as well.
    You really need to get a wiring diagram and an electrical meter to check things out.
     
  3. ImperialCrown

    Level III Supporter

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    If the carpet gets wet, the foot switch is susceptible to corrosion that can disable both high and low beams. Pull the carpet back and check for power in-power out.
    A 12 volt test light is a great tool for finding out where the power stops.
    You might find a public library with the older Mitchell/Motor manuals that have wiring diagrams for older cars. This would include the wire colors to look for. The manuals may not be on the shelf. Ask at the circulation desk.
    I have also seen cases where both headlamp bulbs have blown at the same time.
     
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  4. ka9yhd

    ka9yhd Active Member

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    A friend bought an 87 Omni used and while driving it before purchasing it, he clicked on the high beams and nothing. Low beams worked but not the high beams. Turns out that both high beam lamps were burnt out.
     
  5. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    Could it be a fuse?
     
  6. GLHS60

    GLHS60 Well-Known Member

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    Reminds me of a friend calling and calling about diagnosing no headlights.

    Both were burned out!!

    Thanks
    Randy

     
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  7. GLHS60

    GLHS60 Well-Known Member

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    No fuse, but older cars had a circuit breaker built in the headlight switch.

    Headlights blinking on and off was a considered safer rather than the lights going totally out at night.

    Thanks
    Randy


     
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  8. ka9yhd

    ka9yhd Active Member

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    For the headlamp connectors and the hi/ low beam switch connector, I would put some dielectric grease on the terminals to keep the moisture away which will cause corrosion.
     
  9. 68RT

    68RT Well-Known Member

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    1977 Volare shows only a fusible link (AutoZone provided wiring diagram). No fuse or circuit breaker. Also the same fusible link powers the park lights. Park lights work, fusible link should be good. Fuse fuse/breaker on this switch at all.
     
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  10. GLHS60

    GLHS60 Well-Known Member

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    The headlight circuit breaker is an integral part of the head light switch.

    As mentioned, its to prevent a total lights out when possible, its preferred to have the lights going off, then on, when the switch is overloaded.

    I have never taken apart a headlight switch that didn't have one, but I certainly haven't taken apart every type of headlight switch.

    Thanks
    Randy

    From Mustang Monthly

    ""This is the headlight circuit breaker. Note the contact points and a bimetallic strip, which work together for circuit protection. When contact points become dirty or corroded, it creates resistance to current flow and the resulting heat, which causes the bimetallic strip to bend, opening the points (lights cycle off). The circuit breaker cools quickly and the contact points close (lights cycle on). This starts a process of lights off and on.""
    [​IMG]



    Today’s Technician: Automotive Electricity and Electronics
     
  11. valiant67

    valiant67 Rich Corinthian Leather
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    It is not uncommon for the switch to fail and when you look behind the switch to find a semi-melted plug. Chrysler could have used a relay to keep so much heat away from the switch, but that added cost and really I don't think anyone did it.
     
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  12. ka9yhd

    ka9yhd Active Member

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    I would consider using a headlamp wiring kit to keep all that current out of the headlamp switch. Relays in the wiring kit are controlled by the headlamp switch and the wiring kit is connected to the battery or charging circuit through fuses.

    Daniel Stern Lighting Consultancy and Supply
     
  13. pt006

    pt006 Active Member

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    Bomber; reread IC's post #3. This [the hi/lo beam switch] is the most common cause. mopar headlight switches of this era are pretty dependable. The fusible links rarely go bad. When the wiring connectors are clean and corrosion free, the factory headlight systems are quite dependable.
     
  14. thebrownbomber

    thebrownbomber New Member

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    it was the dash switch.
     

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