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AN: New for Ram 2014

Discussion in 'Mopar / FCA News' started by Stratuscaster, Jun 28, 2013.

  1. Mike V.

    Mike V. Mopar-nac The Moderator

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    That's scary. Luckily I have never had that experience. We bought a Duster once with a broken torsion bar.

    Mike
     
  2. TWX

    TWX DO NOT FEED THE TROLLS!
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    A friend of mine had a torsion bar on an M-Body break while sitting at a light.

    I like torsion bars in concept and for practical purposes in packaging (no strut towers) but I can see whh they are less popular than they once were.
     
  3. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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    A certain engineer said they were less tuneable, at least in the configuration Chrysler used.

    I always liked by torsion-bar Mopars but I've heard lots of stories of snapping. Didn't know GM used them.
     
  4. highland breeze

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    I had a 1976 Dodge Aspen wagon. The torsion bar suspension was almost impossible to keep aligned properly. I am glad that Chrysler has moved on.
     
  5. TWX

    TWX DO NOT FEED THE TROLLS!
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    that was because the torsion bar was also the strut rod, instead of having a separate strut rod like the older cars. Some magazines have built F/J/M bodies for races and added their own strut rods and done well with them.

    My '95 Nissan Hardbody pickup has torsion bars running lengthwise underneath. They adjust at the back of the bar like the oldest Mopars did. The truck also has a steering gearbox and tie rods and center link located behind the front axle, again, like the Mopars did.
     
  6. Mike V.

    Mike V. Mopar-nac The Moderator

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    There are several different ways to use torsion bars on an automotive suspension. Lumping all of those ways into a single comment, like yours, is really inaccurate. Please don't throw a blanket over torsions bats like you did as it makes you look severely uninformed.

    Take some time and research the suspensions on Mopar's here on Allpar and you will see that your Aspen had a different design then was was used on Mopars throughout the 60s and most of the 70s. It is also nothing like what is used on GM trucks today.

    Mike
     
  7. JTE

    JTE Well-Known Member

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    Torsion bars were used on the front of Ram pick ups as late as 2005.
    They were replaced by coils for all the reasons stated above, tuning, ease of assembly, packaging, complexity and alignment. Those are also why it's unlikely they would add those short falls back into the truck.

    As a thought starter for pro t-bar advocates, since we're talking about rear suspensions, how would you package longitudinal bars around the fuel tank and what crossmember would they anchor to?

    Or mount the anchor point on transverse bars, while clearing the exhaust, tank or spare tire?

    Also you have to isolate NVH from the frame.

    Doing this while lowering the existing complexity of two springs and four welded perches.
     
  8. Mike V.

    Mike V. Mopar-nac The Moderator

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    Personally, attempting a torsion bar on the rear of a truck is not something I would even try to do.

    I am a fan of the coil link on the Ram. I appreciate the torsion bar front end of the old cars too.

    Mike
     

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