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AN: Ram 1500 Diesel finally official

Discussion in 'Vans' started by Allpar News System, Feb 14, 2013.

  1. Also remember someone posted on here a while back that the inline engines might only be used in the 3500/4500/5500 in future trucks. Maybe the V engine will go into the 2500 trucks.
     
  2. MoparNorm

    MoparNorm Active Jeeper
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    The inline is currently offered in the 2500, so that remains to be seen.
    So far, the "V" diesel engines have not matched the inline in mpg, but that could change with the next level of technology.
     
  3. 66coronet

    66coronet Well-Known Member

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    Why not buy a chassis cab and make it yourself? That way you get the bed you want and stacks if you want.


    My opinion, not everyone needs the 6.7L power with the 2500. A slant 6 was good enough for some in the 60's - 70's. The VM3.0L has 420lb-ft at 1800 and for many that's good enough. Plus if they offer the VM2.987 in Europe it's under 3.0L and might sell more vehicles do to less tax.
     
  4. scatpack_69

    scatpack_69 Active Member

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    I highly doubt that will happen; the V6 may be offered as an option, but I don't see it replacing the 6.7.

    What V doesn't beat the inline? If you're referring to the 6.7 Powerstroke and LML Duramax, you'd be wrong. They both get better mileage than the 6.7 does.
     
  5. Bj Kline

    Bj Kline New Member

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  6. JRS200x

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  7. MoparNorm

    MoparNorm Active Jeeper
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    Maybe in Ford's fantasy world of their own test results, but in the real world, towing comparable loads, the Cummins out powers and out shines the Ford engines in mpg.
    I towed a 5,500 lb load 350 miles with my Cummins, averaging 16 mpg.
    I towed a 5,000 lb load over the same distance with a borrowed Ford, 8 mpg, further more, I was stuck with that truck for 2,700 miles, averaged 8.8 mpg for the entire ordeal.
    Sorry, I'm not wrong about the Inline Cummins vs. a Ford V8 diesel.
    I have two friends with Isuzu's, they get quieter and quieter, about fuel economy, the longer they own and work their trucks.
    Inline engines, gas or diesel, are better suited to work.
     
  8. MoparNorm

    MoparNorm Active Jeeper
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    Diesel engines develop the same power (torque), while using approx. 30-35% less fuel, than gasoline engines of the same size.
    If Bob was here, he'd explain the BTU's and the energy produced, per pound of fuel consumed.
     
  9. burtstwins

    burtstwins Well-Known Member

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    It's pretty complicated, but for general purposes, here's a few basic parameters to look at-
    3.0L vs, 5.7L - cubic volume- smaller less fuel and air
    15.5:1 vs. 10:1 - Compression Ratio - higher is more power and torque per stroke of piston,
    thus the 3.0L is producing the about same torque as the 5.7L using much less fuel and it produces at much less RPM.
    Also torque is what gets the vehicle moving (not horsepower unless you are turning major RPM's which is not conducive to MPG's)
    Does this help, anybody throw in here if I'm wrong on anything or left out anything.
     
  10. neebs22

    neebs22 Active Member

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    You're not comparing apples to apples here... the 6.7Powerstroke and LML Duramax both utilize DEF in their NOx reduction solution... the 6.7L Cummins trucks that are on the road right now do not and rely solely on in-cylinder reduction techniques(heavy EGR load) to reduce NOx all of which are detrimental to fuel efficiency. Let's compare again when the 2013 Ram HD's hit the street and see what kind of fuel mileage they get..

    Considering that we already know that the 3.0L VM gets at least 30% better fuel economy than the Hemi in the 2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee, it's safe to assume it will get 30% better fuel economy then the Hemi in the Ram 1500.

    Where this engine will really shine is towing and not because you will get an increased tow rating but because the low end torque at cruising RPM along with the turbocharger will keep this engine in it's powerband without needing to downshift and pump up the RPM...

    I'd also speculate that they will have a different tune for the trucks that will boost torque to 440-450 lb-ft so that they can claim the highest torque rating in the class.
     
  11. scatpack_69

    scatpack_69 Active Member

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    Except I AM comparing apples to apples; I'm comparing what's on the road, NOW. Future models don't amount to squat.

    The 6.7 Cummins averages typically 13-15 empty. An LML is generally in the 15-18 range empty, as is the 6.7 Powerstroke. You'll occasionally get guys reporting 20, but on any new emissions-saddled platform, I have a hard time believing those much of the time.

    Which one tows better? Toss up between the Cummins and Duramax IMO. The Fords...well I've never really been a fan of them, towing or empty.
     
  12. AutoTechnician

    AutoTechnician Well-Known Member

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    Then you were driving a 6.4, not a 6.7. The Navistar 6.4 had many issues with DPF regeneration and burnt a lot of fuel. The LML Duramax and 6.7 PowerStroke have better fuel economy and power compared to the 6.7 Cummins. It's been beaten to death in the reviews both online and on the magazines, and with real-world towing. The 6.7 Cummins currently has the least power and fuel economy of any of the current diesel engines. This is expected to change whenever Ram gets the 385HP/850TQ SCR equipped trucks shipped.

    An even-fire V6 diesel with the same displacement, stroke, bore and deck height and fueling will pretty much make the same power, and deliver it the same way as an inline 6. Likewise, there is nothing about a V8 that really says it's not as capable of "doing work" as an inline engine. In fact, some of the most famous, hardest working diesels in the world are V-engines - The Scania V8s for example.
     
  13. Mike V.

    Mike V. Mopar-nac The Moderator

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    But alas, he is gone :cry:

    Mike
     
  14. MoparNorm

    MoparNorm Active Jeeper
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    I'm very familiar with V diesels. I have driven many. An inline six inherently develops more torque than an equal displacement V.
     
  15. Marauder_Pilot

    Marauder_Pilot Well-Known Member

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    Wait, what happened to Bob?
     
  16. burtstwins

    burtstwins Well-Known Member

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    ???
     
  17. Stratuscaster

    Stratuscaster Vaguely badass...
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    Bob has opted to step away from Allpar at this time. I won't go into details here.
     
  18. I should've been more precise. I meant the V engine from Cummins in the 2500, not the VM engine. I believe there is a V8 diesel floating around Cummins that fills those shoes.
     
  19. Ramfan

    Ramfan Member

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    Hmnn it always seem to me that the V made better get you moving from a dead stop grunt and the in line made better hold your speed lug. Even if or though they have the same displacement and make the same torque number. It may just be a fallacy of experiences though.
     
  20. MoparNorm

    MoparNorm Active Jeeper
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    Are you thinking "equal displacement", or gas vs. diesel?
    It's actually the opposite, an inline six will move you off the line faster because of low range torque. Depending upon gearing, the engine will likely run out of power before a V, because the V will rev higher.
    Because of emission tuning, V's develop their torque at higher rpm's and because of that they are mid-range and high rpm suitable.
    VM has designed the 3.0 to carry big torque numbers (equal to the Hemi 5.7) at low to mid range and still meet emissions.
    It's a very good engine and unlike most lightweight diesels, it's not "disposable". However it's also not a 300,000 mile engine like the Cummins in-line, V engines will, likely last 150,000-200,000 miles before requiring work.
     

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