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Bristol Brigand V8 Turbo

Discussion in 'Outside North America' started by Star Car, Feb 6, 2020.

  1. GLHS60

    GLHS60 Well-Known Member

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    Walt, your post reminds me of an experience with a 1980 Cadillac Digital Electronic Fuel Injection.

    The owner asked me to drive it for a few days to see if I could figure anything out.

    I had no EFI experience but thought perhaps I could learn something while driving a nice car.

    The local GM dealer wouldn't look at it but gave me access to their service manuals.

    I'll never forget the diagnostic procedure in the Cadillac service manual back then:

    Remove air cleaner, observe fuel spray while idling and compare with a properly running Engine!!

    Oddly, on Cadillac's, DEFI meant throttle body injection and EFI meant port injection.

    It ended up the A/C system was slightly low on Freon and this caused erratic running.


    Thanks
    Randy
     
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  2. Star Car

    Star Car Member

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    Unfortunate the M-body was limited by the design of its front-suspension, was an alternative more useful design ever considered during its development?

    Agreed on the 318 LA V8 TBI being a missed opportunity for the M-Body.

    Thanks for giving some background into the events at Chrysler in the US, the only frame of reference up to now has been from the Chrysler Europe with both Rootes and Simca, which had their own issues as well as their own projects that were killed by the old guard from the likes of the Rootes Asp (despite the success of the MG Midget and Triumph Spitfire) and Mini-like Simca 936 (that could have replaced both the Hillman Imp and Simca 1000 prior to later being replaced by the C2-Short) up to the Avenger-based V6 and 180-based upscaled D-Car project intended to replace the Humber Super Snipe (that along with with the 180 itself could have been useful in the US with the D-Car potentially butterflying away the R-Body).

    Prior to Iaccoca was there no earlier point in Chrysler's history where the old guard could have been swept aside from positions of influence or the company could have placed themselves in a better position from the late-50s to early/mid-1960s? From my limited perspective Chrysler basically placed themselves in a very difficult position by not pursuing its own equivalent of GM's TASC commonality programme to atomize costs between the US/Oz/European divisions, which was not helped by the limited applications of the Slant-6 and Hemi-6 layouts compared to the LA V6 and 3.3/3.8 V6 or the fact the LA V8 could not slot into the Sunbeam Tiger or Chrysler Centura.

    Turbocharged LA V6 and V8 engines might have found some role in the late-1970s onwards depending on how Chrysler would have evolved in different more confident circumstances
     
  3. valiant67

    valiant67 ...

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    I would think they obviously considered the more conventional torsion bar setup of the A body. However the A body never used the isolated setup that B bodies had switched to for reduced NVH (Noise, Vibration, Harshness) in 1973. But the isolated setup they ended up using was the transverse setup.
    I’ve read that coils, as other manufacturers used, were considered but that the feeling was the torsion bars would feel more like a large car rather than a compact.
     
  4. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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    I hadn't read that but it sounds consistent. The Volare did have a nicer ride than some other compact cars. Only Diplomat I've been in was set up as a police car and was very firm-riding. We have an interview somewhere on Allpar about why they switched ot the transverse torsion bars. In retrospect the coils probably would have been better, but in the end the M bodies were mostly used by the police (ride not quite as important) or as luxury cars. Would they have performed better as police cars with coil springs? Maybe, but they were highly rated by the officers who drove them...
     
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  5. Star Car

    Star Car Member

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    How does the suspension work Monteverdi did with the Aspen-based Sierra compare to the F/M-Body setup?
     
  6. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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    It's in the allpar story... hint: it was not the same!
     
  7. Star Car

    Star Car Member

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    Am aware it is not the same, just interested to know if the work Monteverdi did on the suspension could be considered an improvement?
     
  8. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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    Not having driven the car, I don't know, but it's worth noting that Monteverdi did not have to sell the Volare at a competitive price. You could say that Maserati dramatically improved the suspension of the 300C, and I would agree with you, but they can charge roughly 1.5x what Chrysler does and still make a profit, so ... it's not apples to apples. (Incidentally, I believe that if not for Giorgio, Chrysler would basically have adopted the Maserati changes for the 300C, and it would have been done two years ago. I think that regardless of cost, the Maserati changes were good, but Chrysler was on a smaller budget.)

    Another issue for the Volare was time; they were desperate to get the car out there, and really should have waited for the 1977 model year regardless. As it is, they rushed it so much that it came out deeply flawed and they lost their shirts in both warranty claims and reputation, and the Volare failed to maintain the old Valiant's sales numbers.
     
  9. Star Car

    Star Car Member

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    Though it is easy to say now with the benefit of hindsight, Chrysler had they made the right choices could have given the Volare more sophisticated suspension via some early equivalent of GM's TASC programme or even replaced the F / M platforms (and preceding later A platform) with a stretched 180 / Centura platform that Chrysler UK were considering for a possible D Car project to replace the Humber Super Snipe.

    Had the D Car project been approved Chrysler could have given it the rigidity needed to cope with the LA V8 for other markets, which was not the case with the smaller Centura. Additionally it would have allowed the company to further integrate their European, US and Australian divisions to help atomize and spread out the costs.
     

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