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Can Alfa Romeo be saved?

Discussion in 'Mopar News' started by Beentherebefore, Dec 28, 2019.

  1. Adventurer55

    Adventurer55 Well-Known Member

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    After reading what was going on behind the scenes regarding the GM merger crap, all of his moves make perfect sense now. I believe he was setting up FCA to merge with GM . Hense the all the loss of product and investment in Dodge and Chrysler. They were to be canned, leaving only Ram and Jeep.
     
  2. aldo90731

    Level III Supporter

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    Not just short of funds; short of vision, too.

    FCA has proved utterly short of imagination when it comes to Chrysler and Lancia, shortsighted when it comes to Dodge, and short-changed when it comes to Alfa Romeo.
     
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  3. Adventurer55

    Adventurer55 Well-Known Member

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    At the time, he was heralded as a visionary when the Dart and 200 were canned. But with all this info coming forward I don't think that at all. Dodge and Chrysler wasn't needed in the GM scheme, but Alfa was. That's why none of it's architectures were brought down like originally planned. I'm not even sure anything but Wrangler would've survived. GM had plenty to build a new Grand Cherokee and the rest of the softer ones. Hence the very long product delays.
     
  4. valiant67

    valiant67 ...

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    Yes, NA is where the vast majority of profits came from.
    But people don't buy plants. They buy vehicles and new vehicle launches from FCA have been scarce - almost from the very beginnings of FCA.
    Other companies reinvest in plants (even converting plants from unibody to RWD, something someone claimed only FCA did) and still manage to launch new vehicles. FCA's conditions aren't unique - only their drip-drip of new models is unique.
     
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  5. ehaase

    ehaase Active Member

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    All those Opel based Buicks are being discontinued. Buick will be only a crossover division. Can't see new Chrysler sedans succeeding since Buick sedans failed. I'm not sure Chrysler competitors for the Encore, Endeavor, and Enclave would succeed when the Jeep crossovers/SUV's already do OK.
     
  6. codypet

    codypet Well-Known Member

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    If the Buick Tourx had a Mopar performance engine and was sold here as a Chrysler and and the suspension was somehow updated to make an Outback competitor, you'd see that car fly off the lots.
     
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  7. Adventurer55

    Adventurer55 Well-Known Member

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    I would imagine that no trace of GM will be left in the Opel range once Peugeot's time expires. They certainly won't let Chrysler have anything, unless it's old and GM doesn't want it anymore.
     
  8. aldo90731

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    Chrysler was selling 300s by the boatload when neither Buick, nor Chevrolet, nor Ford could sell large sedans. I don’t know whether 300 would be successful in these market conditions. But back then the large sedan was dead and Chrysler brought it back single handedly.

    That was the skill of the executives that came up the ranks at the old Chrysler Corp.: they could see a viable white space where its less flexible competitors couldn’t. The same could be said of the original Sebring convertible, of the Dodge Dakota and the original Dodge Ram.

    Unfortunately, I don’t see the same skill at FCA. Whatever has been successful, like Wrangler, Ram, Grand Cherokee, and perhaps Challenger and Journey, they simply took someone else’s idea and gave it a new interior, a new transmission and broadened the engine offerings. Steps that would have been par for the course during a redesign. Granted, it did it well, but IMO FCA is missing the ability to see beyond what is already out there.
     
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  9. valiant67

    valiant67 ...

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    Agreed.
    Iacocca's (borrowed) phrase was "lead, follow, or get out of the way". FCA's strategy has been pretty much following and getting out of the way.
     
  10. Adventurer55

    Adventurer55 Well-Known Member

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    These last few years have made things extremely lucky for them. Trucks and Jeeps have virtually sold themselves. This company needs an honest and strong leader. I hope Carlos Tavares is that man. They need a plan going forward that is properly financed.
     
  11. Tin Man 2

    Tin Man 2 Active Member

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    Don’t forget the Renagade and new Compass are a big improvement in the small vehicle segment for FCA. If times get bad we do have some nice small vehicles to fall back on.
     
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  12. aldo90731

    Level III Supporter

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    Neither Renegade nor Compass were ground breaking. The competition had been offering similar CUVs and Jeep had to get into the fray.

    2019 sales of both Renegade and Compass paled against those of competitors.
     
  13. turbonetic

    turbonetic Member

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    GM shot him down in 2 seconds and no CEO would sabotage his own company to appear better for a merger. They told us all what happened and it started right after Fiat took the helm. Jeep = SUVs, Ram = trucks, Dodge = muscle, Chrysler = took them awhile to define and it never really happened, but people movers. Now this all may have made sense in 2009 and when they were defining the brands but once SUV mania took over it was the worst idea ever.

    ALL brands need cross overs and SUV's, not just Jeep! Jeep even has a truck now. Dodge is hopefully getting a muscle CUV and Chrysler will be where they put capable french cars that are a fit for north america. It'll be a good start at getting "the FCA side" back on track.
     
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  14. Mr. Fusion

    Mr. Fusion Active Member

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    This is tied-in with the survival plan of the company. The goal was to get the combined company's financial house in order. They had a finite amount of money to spend on new product, and a limited number of plants in which to build it. Everyone here knows this. Not everyone liked FCA's game plan, but exactly how many new cars would have been released in the alternative scenario where Chrysler Group no longer existed? (Yes, someone would have probably bought the Jeep name, but that's it.)

    Now I think everyone here would agree that going forward, this company has to release new product, it has to improve vehicle quality, and it has to improve the dealership experience, all in order to remain relevant. But complaining about past decisions that curtailed product but literally saved the company, just seems so pointless to me. It's like someone who has successfully undergone a life-saving surgery complaining about the ambulance ride.
     
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  15. valiant67

    valiant67 ...

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    Things could have been handled in a less disruptive way. Product development didn’t have to stop. Those are choices they made and the neglected brands will be paying the price for some time. Rebuilding a brand is more expensive than maintaining a brand.

    if they could not support the brands they had, it wasn’t a viable long term enterprise. I guess that was known hence the “merger mania”.
     
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  16. aldo90731

    Level III Supporter

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    Ehem...
    [​IMG]
     
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  17. Adventurer55

    Adventurer55 Well-Known Member

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    I merely speculate, but there are people that know the truth. I would suspect that this is far from over. I go back to a post made not long ago about Kokomo. There were apparently long term plans there at one time and it seems many were cancelled. It may be nothing, or it may play into what his plans were.
     
  18. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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    I don't know who that is, but if it's the Sears guy... then yes...
     
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  19. Adventurer55

    Adventurer55 Well-Known Member

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    Different names, but almost the same plan. Pocket millions and care not what you did to the company.
     
  20. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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    Well, that's almost every CEO... Akerson was of that nature; Fritz wanted to use the brush with depth to completely reform GM and eject all the lavish spending of the old culture, and Akerson kicked him right out. “If there's lavish spending, I want it!”
     
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