AF: charge temperature sensor | Allpar Forums
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

charge temperature sensor

Discussion in 'EEK! - Every Extended-K Car' started by willrappold, Apr 11, 2016.

  1. willrappold

    willrappold Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2013
    Messages:
    57
    Likes:
    3
    where is the charge temperature sensor located on a 85 reliant se 2.2l tbi? I'm trying to check this and see if this is causing my hard/flooded starts when the outside temp is below 60 degrees. thanks.
     
  2. Bob Lincoln

    Bob Lincoln "CHECK FAULT CODES"
    Level 2 Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2002
    Messages:
    31,919
    Likes:
    5,242
    Hard to describe, but it's a 2-wire sensor that goes through the outer casting of the throttle body near the top.
    Do you have any stored fault codes?
     
  3. ImperialCrown

    ImperialCrown Moderator
    Level III Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2008
    Messages:
    21,265
    Likes:
    4,457
    The fuel mixture may be more dependent on what the engine coolant temperature sensor reads than the incoming air temp sensor.
    Early EFI and all turbo vehicles use a charge air temperature sensor screwed into the intake manifold as the raised air pressure out of a turbocharger can make a big difference in temperature. Low pressures (intake manifold vacuum) found in naturally-aspirated EFI cars are much cooler.
    The compressed air delivered by a turbo gets pretty warm.
    Charge air temperature sensors themselves were fairly trouble-free.
    1985 was before they used 'intercoolers' to cool (increase the density of) the compressed air out of the turbocharger.
    2zhmonm.jpg
    21e0ymg.jpg
    14dfrs6.jpg
    11uzrqb.jpg
    Make sure that your secondary ignition system is in good shape (coil, cap, rotor, wires and plugs). It takes a much higher firing voltage to start a cold engine than a warm engine. If the ignition system has a difficult time making the required spark voltage, it can be hard to start and can misfire until it warms.
    Always diagnose first.
     
  4. willrappold

    willrappold Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2013
    Messages:
    57
    Likes:
    3
    No fault codes. Have to check the distributor, has newer plugs, wires and coil. It misses some while driving, but this start up condition is like its sending to much fuel for fist start, got to give it gas to keep it going, and can smell the extra fuel in the exhaust. Tried a couple of Map sensors, doesn't help any. Also I think the vacuum pump for the purge canister has gone bad in the front finder because I get a bad fuel order after driving from that side, no fuel leaks though. What about the door below the air filter in the cooling box how does that work?
     
  5. ImperialCrown

    ImperialCrown Moderator
    Level III Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2008
    Messages:
    21,265
    Likes:
    4,457
    The misfire while driving and the hard start when cold may be related. There shouldn't be any 'vacuum pump', it may be the charcoal canister.
    You shouldn't get any fuel fumes, there may be a cracked or disconnected hose in that area. There should be a vacuum hose diagram label under the hood somewhere that might help you follow and identify a leaking evaporative hose or component.
    The air door in the air cleaner will draw heated air up from around the exhaust when cold and a temperature sensor in the air cleaner will vary the vacuum to this door to keep the incoming air at about 100°F. It was important in the carburetor days, but not so much for EFI and it was discontinued in the mid-'80's.
    Are they the correct Champion plugs for your car? Incorrect plugs can cause issues, especially cold. What color are the plug tips? Black would indicate rich fouling.
    The cap and rotor must be in good shape. The carbon button under the cap should have a shiny spot where it contacts the rotor in the center. If the button is dull or burnt, then it isn't touching the rotor. The amount of dust should be low. High dust, especially metallic dust means that something is rubbing, possibly the vanes under the pickup plate? Metallic dust inside the distributor can also conduct spark and cause misfire. The distributor shaft shouldn't have any wobble or play.
     
  6. Bob Lincoln

    Bob Lincoln "CHECK FAULT CODES"
    Level 2 Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2002
    Messages:
    31,919
    Likes:
    5,242
    His "vacuum pump" is probably the evaporative purge solenoid.

    I would check ALL of the vacuum lines for breaks or miswiring against a known good diagram for that car. Could be that the MAP sensor is not connected to full vacuum, or that there is some other vacuum-related issue.

    Pre-heater hose was still around in 1993. But it would not have this drastic an effect.
     
  7. GLHS60

    GLHS60 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2008
    Messages:
    1,998
    Likes:
    687
    In my experience, as IC noted, the coolant temperature sensor is a very likely suspect in the cold weather flooding.

    Thanks
    Randy
     
  8. willrappold

    willrappold Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2013
    Messages:
    57
    Likes:
    3
    also sometimes the radiator fan cuts on off a lot, other days works perfect so maybe it is the coolant temp sensor.
     
  9. ImperialCrown

    ImperialCrown Moderator
    Level III Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2008
    Messages:
    21,265
    Likes:
    4,457
    Diagnose first. When in the defrost or A/C mode, the radiator fan may cycle on/off.
    Read the sensor resistance cold. It is the 2-terminal one on the thermostat housing. The one with the violet wire near the #1 spark plug is just for the dash gauge.
     

Share This Page

Loading...
 We are not affiliated with FCA. We make no claims regarding validity or accuracy of information or advice. Copyright © VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.