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Chevy, Lincoln dealers say they still want sedans

Discussion in 'Auto News & Rumors' started by page2171, Feb 17, 2020.

  1. page2171

    page2171 Well-Known Member

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    The topic of moving away from sedans had been pretty well beat to death. But this article caught my eye after spending last Saturday car shopping. My son needed to replace his (previously mine) Saturn Aura after it was totalled a couple weeks ago. And, he wanted (insert dramatic pause) another sedan. Now, he's a senior in college and not interested in taking on a car payment. So, he was in the used market. But, even looking at 5-8 year old cars, there's not a great selection of small sedans. With automakers moving away from sedans, that selection isn't going to get any better.

    Chevy, Lincoln dealers say they still want sedans (at https://www.yahoo.com/amphtml/autos/chevy-lincoln-dealers-still-want-195200545.html )
     
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  2. voiceofstl

    voiceofstl Well-Known Member

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    You can get a older Impala dirt cheap.
     
  3. page2171

    page2171 Well-Known Member

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    He didn't want something that drives like a barge. He wanted something small and maneuverable because he lives and goes to school in a cramped downtown area. He found a 2011 Kia Forte that was just what he was looking for.
     
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  4. patfromigh

    patfromigh Well-Known Member

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    I'm glad to see some of these sedans go away. The Chevrolet Impala and Cadillac XTS sacrificed utility and comfort on the altar of sportiness. This is especially apparent when the final outgoing models are compared to previous generations. "Fitness for use" is an important criteria for judging quality. If people can't find comfort in a sedan, they will look for it in a crossover. Sometimes I suspect manufacturers make their sedans uncomfortably low slung and sporty on purpose so those models don't become an "old man's car."

    Back in the 1970s and 80s people bought hatchbacks in large numbers. Those cars from long ago are not much different in size from some of the new compact CUVs and SUVs. A front drive Trax is is a much better car than the Sonic and Spark found in the same showroom. Besides dealers have to get on the ball and start selling those Bolt EVs. I'm not being sarcastic, that's GM's thinking on small cars. I don"t agree with their EV or nothing approach, I'm just explaining why there isn't a Cruze anymore. (Or the Volt for that matter.)

    Let's be honest, crossovers like the Hyundai Kona are still cars, no matter what the manufacturer calls it. Hyundai still pursues the sedan market, but their new Venue "urban utility vehicle" is more comfortable than many small sedans. What is the Kia Soul classified as? I mean there's no denying it's a roomy little hatchback. But what does Hyundai call it?

    Lincoln doesn't have a proper replacement for the dearly departed Town Car. The Continental is a nice enough car, but it falls short.
     
  5. Tony K

    Tony K Active Member

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    IDK what Hyundai calls it, but Kia calls it a hatchback.
     
  6. Tin Man 2

    Tin Man 2 Active Member

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    Many people still want a roomy rear wheel drive sedan, the new continental failed because it was FWD. The automakers want to build FWD because they are cheaper to produce. FCA is screwing up big time by choking off the 300.
     
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  7. patfromigh

    patfromigh Well-Known Member

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    Officially, Kia says it's a small station wagon. The Soul is taller than some other brand's crossovers, but it's a car.
     
  8. sickboy

    sickboy Well-Known Member

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    What is wrong with an old man car? I love the grandpa mobile. A soft cushy car that floats over bumps and wallows over corners. Euros can keep the Nurburgring, give me pot hole tested. Where’s my American rolls royce? Why can’t that be the new 300? That would put it in an unchallenged class of its own.
     
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  9. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
    Staff Member Level III Supporter

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    There are lots and lots of old sedans for sale. Darts are all over the place. Cruzes. Fusion and Focus, if you can have a Nazi’s name on your car. Civics, Corollas, etc are plentiful. I can find dozens of Mazda3s wihtout half trying.
     
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  10. Ryan

    Staff Member Level III Supporter

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    I don't think FWD is what caused the Continental to fail. It was mostly the constraints of the body style. You can buy a Nautilus for $5,000 less and an Aviator for $5,000 more. Both of those are vastly more practical, comfortable choices.
     
  11. patfromigh

    patfromigh Well-Known Member

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    "You can sell a young man's car to an old man, but you'll never sell an old man's car to a young man." (That quote is from before PC speech, so it uses "man" instead of person.) In the late 1990's GM made the decision to discontinue their large BOF rear drive sedans and switch production at the plant to BOF large SUVs. Around the same time the Cadillac Escalade was introduced. The automobile business is as much about fashion as it is about personal transportation products. Limos are out, Black Suburbans are in.

    Chrysler Corporation was thoroughly punished by the buying public in the first half of the 1950s, when they offered taller a more upright conservative style against the sleeker Ford and GM styling. Automakers are still superstitious over such things today. That was the beginning of the lower, longer and wider marketing slogan along with the mentality which accompanies it.

    Western culture is thoroughly indoctrinated into a pseudo-Darwinism believing everything newer is better. The latest is the greatest, and newer is truer. It is hard selling an old man's car under such thinking. Tradition is seen as a straight jacket, so the traditional sedan, especially an American R-R, is out of the question.
     
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  12. valiant67

    valiant67 ...

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    The Continental lacked the bold exterior statement the new Lincoln SUVs have.Maybe a little less blob style and RWD and Continental may have done better. Probably not much better though.
     
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  13. jimboy

    jimboy Well-Known Member

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    So actually, K.T. Keller had it right all along? (our '54 DeSoto was a pretty nice car!) My favorite years of most makes are 54,55,56 when they were transitioning fron the boxy 40's to the overkill of the late 50's. Pretty much every Ford Chevy or Chrysler product was good looking and practical, IMO.
     
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  14. voiceofstl

    voiceofstl Well-Known Member

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    Youare so right.. A great example is the 2008-09 Taruas (500)...it had large doors, high seats, tons of head room and a large trunk OPENING.....then they turned it into a "sports sedan"..it had less room then a accord,
     
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  15. patfromigh

    patfromigh Well-Known Member

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    The problems with the Taurus/500/Montego sedans weren't related to the styling, IMO. The anemic V6 attached to a CVT played a huge part in sinking any sales success. The Chrysler 300 was introduced at the same time (2005-6) and stole a lot of the new model limelight from the Ford products. It also didn't help that the Crown Vic was still on sale in those years. Liability issues pretty much killed bench seats (airbags and placing child seats in the front seat), but Ford didn't have to go with that huge center console in the sportier replacement.

    The Ford sedans of the last decade were co-developed with the other companies Ford bought into. The Ford Taurus/500 shared development with Volvo while the Lincoln LS shared with Jaguar. The outgoing front drive based Explorer in turn shared much with the discontinued Taurus. Ford selling off Jaguar and Volvo also plays into discontinuing most of their sedans, because their replacements won't have shared development costs. There is some irony in this, because one of the reasons Americans don't buy sedans is that cars tailored for a global market generally don't appeal to Americans. That I know of, none of the US states have a displacement tax like those found overseas. Yet the Lincoln LS was introduced with small displacement V6 and V8 engines. The engines in the LS seemed wimpy especially in light of the return of the Hemi at Chrysler. The LS was also on the small side as well, also due to chasing some mythical global buyer instead of the American consumer.

    Since 1961 Lincoln sedans shared a platform and some structure with another Ford product. The Lincoln MK7 shared the Fox platform with the Mustang. Imagine if the the LS sedan shared more with the Mustang and used V8s tailored to American tastes. Today the Lincoln sedans are all based on the Focus while the Mustang now has a unique platform.
     
  16. wolfsblood07

    wolfsblood07 Active Member

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    I agree with the article but we need to specify that by cars we mean midsized or larger cars, not just small ones like the Sonic. People still want cars like the Dodge Dynasty, Buick Century, Chevy Impala, Ford Taurus, Oldsmobile Cutlass, etc. They are comfortable and worry-free. I wish they would go back to key start on the column, too.
     
  17. CherokeeVision

    CherokeeVision Well-Known Member

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    Sure seems like there is less space behind the rear seats of the Trax than there is trunk room in the Sonic. I had a Sonic as a company car and I've driven my MIL's Trax. I'll take the Sonic. Not that I personally would buy something that small since it doesn't fit my needs.
     
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  18. voiceofstl

    voiceofstl Well-Known Member

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    The 2008-09 Taurus had the new 3.5 and 6 speed.That alone put it far ahead of the 500/
     
  19. page2171

    page2171 Well-Known Member

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    Around here there are lots for sale, if you are okay with buying from a shady dealer. If you are looking to buy a compact sedan from a reputable dealer, the pickings are pretty slim. We didn't even look at a Dart because the only places I could find them were the dealers that left me feeling slimed just driving by the lot.
     
  20. Ernesto

    Ernesto Active Member

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    In June, 2015, me and 19,000 others bought 200's. FCA is lucky to get 800 Giulias out the door in a month. Something seems mismanaged to me. Should FCA concentrate on Dodge and Chrysler instead of promoting an unwanted Alpha?

    Allen Samuels in Waco wants 200's. He moved'em. Darts not so much.
     
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