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Chrysler’s “Identity”

Discussion in 'Mopar / FCA News' started by 1999 White C5 Coupe, Jan 21, 2020.

  1. ehaase

    ehaase Well-Known Member

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    The new Continental is a flop. Sales are only a few hundred per month. Lincoln will probably exit the sedan market within the next two years.
     
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  2. patfromigh

    patfromigh Well-Known Member

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    Lincoln has some very successful crossovers. The Continental sedan fails because it lacks presence. It gets lost in a sea of SUVs, crossovers and pickup trucks. The Chrysler 300 has some stature to it. I've seen the two cars parked next to each other.
     
  3. TheViking

    TheViking Active Member

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    IMO this new Continental didn't move the bar quite far enough in the way the original 300 did. I either needs to be more sporty or have a more bold exterior design. The only people I see driving them (the few that I actually do see) are elderly men. On top of that Lincoln, like Buick, has a huge perception issue.
     
    #23 TheViking, Jan 22, 2020
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2020
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  4. patfromigh

    patfromigh Well-Known Member

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    I base my opinion on working with a rental fleet. Too many Jeeps are reluctant to downshift and lethargic when upshifting. Many other of the nine-speed equipped FCA vehicles run great. They're responsive and smooth running. For me the percentage of stubborn transmissions is too high. For some reason none of the vans display the 9-speed's bad transmission behavior. The Pacifica and Ram PMC both seem fine.

    It least the front drive based Jeeps don't hang up in the middle of shifting, while letting the engine race into orbit, like a certain Asian brand's segment offering.
     
  5. LoganSix

    LoganSix Well-Known Member

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    You know what got Chrysler notice in the 80's? A convertible. They brought back the convertible.

    Forget all the high end SUVs and CUVs, leave that with Jeep. Why can't Chrysler be touring cars, coupes and convertibles? Then give Dodge the low-end and sport versions. Forget trying to bring Peugeot to life in America or putting more money into Fiat, those are Europe brands. Maserati can be the ultra-high end in the US.
     
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  6. dennisimperial

    dennisimperial Well-Known Member

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    It might be too late for Chrysler in the marketplace and in the minds of consumers....
     
  7. 77 Monaco Brougham

    77 Monaco Brougham Well-Known Member

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    True enough. It makes Vauxhall seem about as tasty as Diabetic Chocolate.:eek::eek::eek:
     
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  8. Adventurer55

    Adventurer55 Well-Known Member

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    I'd rather have an 8sp that shifts like it's rear wheel drive cousin does on cars and trucks.
     
  9. flffddy

    flffddy Well-Known Member

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    There are a few problems with the Continental. One, it's FWD. Two, it doesn't stand out. Oh, it stood out when it was first revealed. But Lincoln took the design and translated it onto all of their other vehicles, including the MKZ which was refreshed at the same time as the Continental was released. So you could buy the brand new Conti, but there was a car that looked nearly identical for $10K less in the same showroom. Built on the same platform. With the same engines. Why would you ever buy that, especially when down the road you could by the very distinct 300 which actually had RWD and a V8?
     
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  10. 77 Monaco Brougham

    77 Monaco Brougham Well-Known Member

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    I interpret this to mean that FCA deliberately "down-sized" Chrysler and Dodge into "boutique" brands. I suppose...on paper...it seems like a logical strategy, but, to Jim & Margaret Q. Public...it may look really disjointed...like something akin to a "Crazy Quilt".
     
  11. Thom Paré

    Thom Paré Active Member

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    When you consider all CDJR brands are sold under a single roof, except Jeep under some very limited circumstances, it doesn't matter how many models each brand is allocated. Chrysler and Dodge are not going anywhere anytime soon.
     
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  12. valiant67

    valiant67 ...

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    But it does matter. People are reluctant to switch brand names, and when forced to do so may go outside the corporate "umbrella". Chrysler (pre-FCA) should have never lost a single customer when they discontinued Plymouth because every Plymouth model was covered in either the Dodge or Plymouth brands. But yet lots of those Plymouth customers were gone.
     
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  13. aldo90731

    Staff Member Level III Supporter

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    FCA, and every automaker for that matter, wants each one of its brands to be self-sustaining. Brands that are not self-sustaining become a drag on resources and vulnerable in changing economic conditions.

    From this standpoint, Chrysler and Dodge need to be able to stand on their own two feet not just for their own sake, but FCA's overall. A well diversified portfolio gives Chrysler, Dodge, and ultimately FCA, the ability to withstand changing market conditions.

    We are already seeing the drawbacks of FCA's strategy that focused solely on margins, as those vehicles --and brands-- that bring the most profits grab a greater share of sales, but are also less fuel efficient and their sales more volatile.
     
  14. Tony K

    Tony K Active Member

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    It's called the market. The market doesn't want "touring cars, coupes, and convertibles," especially not brands that aren't Mercedes or BMW, to name two examples. The market wants SUVs and CUVs, and cheap yet reliable "appliance" sedans.

    That's a risk you take. Note that this was back when Chrysler Corp. dealerships weren't all-in-one facilities across the board, so in many cases, there wasn't going to be an easy retention if your dealer didn't also have Dodge, and Chrysler was too expensive. I grew up in SW Indiana, and used to know who had what dealerships in SW IN and WKY from hearing all the commercials. I know Dave Duell probably got hurt pretty bad at first when Evansville Chrysler-Plymouth became Evansville Chrysler. The Dodge and Jeep franchise was not available. Now his son (?) Doug owns Evansville Kia. They brought on Kia in the interim, then lost Chrysler to Expressway Dodge. Life sucked for some Mopar dealers. That's just the way it is sometimes, and explains all-in-one dealerships.
     
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  15. valiant67

    valiant67 ...

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    Actually Plymouth was discontinued when the consolidation was well underway. While not all were yet consolidated, the pressure was already on dealers before Plymouth was dropped to combine Chrysler/Plymouth, Dodge, and Jeep/Eagle locations (and for nearby locations owned by different entities for one to sell out to the other).
     
  16. flffddy

    flffddy Well-Known Member

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    Well apparently nobody told that to my Chrysler Plymouth dealer, who went through a big expansion as Plymouth was getting the axe, then soldiered on for another 7 years until they finally sold out to the Dodge dealer down the street.
     
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  17. Powdered Toast Man

    Powdered Toast Man Move along, nothing to see here

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    Here's my favourite quote:

     
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  18. jimboy

    jimboy Well-Known Member

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    Look at the early '60's Continentals. Incredible cars, a four door convertible with suicide doors! It was Lincoln that killed Imperial as a brand, they out engineered the engineers, and Chysler didn't fight back hard enough, the 64 - 66's were gorgeous, but the next generation was a flop, since it was so obviously a Chrysler body with just new front and rear caps. The end of Imperial as a brand.
     
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  19. XRT2SRT

    XRT2SRT Well-Known Member

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    Having not taken an in depth look at PSA offerings, I can say that those I have seen would serve the CHRYSLER lineup well with some tweaking. Without saying, a NEW 300 is where it all needs to start. A midsize CUV/SEDAN also. A compact 5 door GT with premium appointments and a niche vehicle slotted above 300 and Pacifica, seating for six, not quite an SUV, not quite a sedan and not so minivan, with height adaptive ride and PHEV/BEV technology standard. Let's call this one IMPERIAL-AMERIQUÉ!
     
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  20. XRT2SRT

    XRT2SRT Well-Known Member

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    Could this be some sort of tuning for the fleet? It seems to be the place where it occurs the most...just wondering.
     

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