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Chrysler Customer First Award -- still around????

Discussion in 'Mopar / FCA News' started by AllanC, Jun 14, 2020.

  1. KrisW

    KrisW Well-Known Member

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    True, but the company's shareholders wouldn't see it that way. Customer satisfaction almost never comes up in financial reports. Investors, especially American investors, care only about how much money you made this quarter, and will you make more next quarter.
     
  2. codypet

    codypet Well-Known Member

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    Is the direct sales model that's been ramping up at Tesla and other automakers going to give the traditional automakers the ability to do direct sales? Especially given the virus circumstances we're in now?
     
  3. gforce2002

    gforce2002 Well-Known Member

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    My local dealer is actually excellent. It’s when something needs to be approved by FCA or they need information from them that the stonewalling starts. FCA would need to understand what customer service is before they could ever attempt a direct sales model.
     
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  4. AllanC

    AllanC Well-Known Member

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    Dealership business organizations within each state have a lot influence / clout with state legislators. State auto dealership regulations would have to change dramatically for manufacturers to start direct sales. Politically that will never happen.
     
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  5. aldo90731

    Staff Member Level III Supporter

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    Not directly, at least. But this indifference towards customer service puts real pressure on customer retention and on customer acquisition, which in turn impact sales, margins, and costs of sales. And those figures are reflected in the financial reports.

    This is particularly true of products that face stiff competition, like Renegade, Compass, Cherokee, Pacifica, Fiats and Alfa Romeos. All of which were showing double-digit declining sales well before the pandemic even hit.
     
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  6. Adventurer55

    Adventurer55 Well-Known Member

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    As I've stated in the past, this is a problem at FCA, that has existed for at least 30 or more years. It's the culture at the company, I believe, how else could you explain it. This is a multigenerational problem at this company, and for too long not one CEO has ever addressed this issue. Dealers don't trust them and they mistrust dealers. In order for the customer experience to improve, this must change.
     
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  7. aldo90731

    Staff Member Level III Supporter

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    A great deal of the success of my old CDJR dealer in Long Beach, California, could be explained by the fact that it carried a LOT of clout with FCA.

    It is a family-owned and operated dealership; it can trace its history back 100+ years; most of the staff has worked there for decades. It is a high-volume dealer, with good customer satisfaction and retention. I knew the Service Manager, the General Sales Manager, the Service Advisors and the Parts Managers.

    For instance, when my 2012 Challenger SRT blew a tire on a mountain road and Roadside Assistance refused to send a tow truck unless I paid for it, shooting the sh*t I mentioned to the Service Manager that FCA should make up its mind: either offer Roadside Assistance that can be trusted, or put a spare tire and jack back in the car. Out of his own initiative, the Service Manager talked to the FCA Regional Manager and got them to pay for a $400 aftermarket spare tire kit for my Challenger. Another time, I mentioned to him that the battery died in my still-under-warranty 2013 Rubicon and had to buy one at a gas station. He said “give me the receipt and I’ll get FCA to pay you back.” Which he did. Another time, after FCA bought back that 2012 Chrysler 300S and I factory ordered a white 2012 Challenger SRT, I mentioned to the Parts Manager that I really liked the SRT stripes in Viper Blue that came on the 2011 392 Inaugural Edition (I.E.), but were restricted. Next thing I know, he tells me that he spoke with FCA, and they are willing to let me order a kit of I.E. OE stripes in Viper Blue, and he would sell them to me at cost!

    Good luck getting that type of service directly from FCA.
     
  8. Adventurer55

    Adventurer55 Well-Known Member

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    I personally believe the service manager and the regional managers all should be sent to retraining when the merger is complete. There has to be some way for both to be put on the same page when it comes to warranty claims. I'd go a step further and make all service managers FCA employees at dealers. I suppose because of ancient franchise laws this isn't allowed. It's just depressing because it always stays the same. When I was young growing up in the 60s, my family rarely had this trouble at any Chrysler dealer. This all seemed to drastically change in the late 70s and nothing they have tried to do seems to work. Luckily, I had a friend that was a longtime power train engineer at Auburn Hills that helped me out with issues several times. Average customers never had that luxury and shouldn't have to have it to get their problems resolved.
     
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  9. aldo90731

    Staff Member Level III Supporter

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    Indeed. Toyota has an entire department called Toyota University tasked with developing, rolling out and implementing ongoing training programs, staffing development, and internal computer applications for corporate and dealer personnel.

    Toyota cannot claim to have the best customer service —Lexus does. But Toyota Motors Corp. certainly has the most satisfied dealers for 20+ years running, and some of the most satisfied employees and suppliers in the industry. They have figured out that (1) thorough documentation and information dissemination, (2) clear and consistent policies and procedures, and (3) fairness and respect —including all parties’ ability to make money, go a long way towards reducing the opportunity for misunderstanding and conflict to emerge. Which in turn results in long-term relationships with employees, dealers, suppliers, investors and customers.
     
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  10. aldo90731

    Staff Member Level III Supporter

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    The independently owned and operated, family-owned dealership has become a thing of the past. Over the past 40 years dealers have been selling their family-held dealerships to ever growing conglomerates.

    Automaker employees prefer dealing with fewer large dealer groups than a mosaic of smaller individually owned and operated dealers. Never mind that large dealer groups can enjoy greater leverage over automakers, or that large dealer groups tend to lose the ability to serve each market individually.
     

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