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CO detection

Discussion in 'Repairs, Maintenance, Help' started by bguy, Dec 20, 2017.

  1. bguy

    bguy Well-Known Member

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    How would you determine a leak while traveling?
     
  2. Doug D

    Doug D Virginia Gentleman

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    There are CO detectors available. Google is your friend.
     
    Bob Lincoln likes this.
  3. NYBo

    Level III Supporter

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    Get a CO detector designed for RVs, not one for houses.
     
  4. ImperialCrown

    Level III Supporter

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    Vehicles aren't airtight and some venting is intentional. Detecting an entry way of outside air would be similar to the diagnostic procedures used for 'wind noise/water leaks' in the service manual.
    I would go around the vehicle listening with an air hose for escaping air at door/window seams from a vehicle with the HVAC blower on and pressurizing the interior cabin. Soapy water can also be used to confirm air leaks at seams, look for bubbles.
    While driving, air flow is supposed to be from high pressure in the front to low pressure out the back, with some venturi-effect (low pressure) along the sides and undercarriage of the vehicle.
    fresh_air_intake.jpg
    Make sure that the rubber seal between the engine compartment and cowl fresh air intake is in place and secure. This seal can be either on the underside of the hood or on the cowl. It should seal with the hood closed.
     

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