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Dodge Ready To Return To NASCAR?

Discussion in 'Motorsports / Racing News' started by dodgeismycar, Dec 4, 2016.

  1. pt006

    pt006 Member

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    There was a time when nascar helped sell cars. 60's and 70's for sure. 427 Galaxies, 421 Pontiacs, Hemis etc. Because the dealers had one on the lot and you could buy it on monday. How many people buy V-8 Scamrys on a monday??????

    Chrysler would help make nascar richer. -------- nascar would do nothing for Chrysler.
     
    DC-93 likes this.
  2. Doug D

    Doug D Virginia Gentleman

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    "Win on Sunday. Sell on Monday." might have garnered a few sales in the old days, but it's highly doubtful it leads to many sales these days.

    A V8 Scamry doesn't exist. ;) Nor does a V8 Fusion.

    The only thing NASCAR might get Chrysler is exposure but I doubt it would directly lead to any sales. NASCAR is more about the drivers and teams. Manufacturers are third at best.
     
    DC-93 likes this.
  3. Fast Eddie

    Fast Eddie Valued Member Level III Supporter

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    NASCAR Vegas Ratings Fall to Record-Low

    BY PAULSEN ON MARCH 16, 2017FOX, NASCAR, RATINGS


    It is still early, but NASCAR’s latest retool has yet turn around its flagging ratings.

    NASCAR Cup Series racing from Las Vegas earned a 3.6 final rating and 6.0 million viewers on FOX last Sunday, down 18% in ratings and 17% in viewership from last year (4.4, 7.2M) and down 22% and 23% respectively from 2015 (4.6, 7.7M).

    The 3.6 rating is the lowest in the history of the race (dates back to 1998), falling below the previous mark of 4.0 on ABC in 2000. Within the past decade, ratings were as high as 5.9 (2011), 6.5 (2009) and even 7.1 (2008).

    In addition to the record-low rating, viewership for the race was the lowest since at least 2001 (viewership prior to 2002 was not available), falling below the previous mark of 7.2 million in 2010. This year’s audience was less than half of the 12.1 million who watched nine years ago.

    NASCAR on FOX is now averaging a 4.7 rating and 8.3 million viewers through three races, down 8% in ratings and 3% in viewership from last year (5.1, 8.5M). The season has already included the lowest rated post-Daytona race since at least 1998 (Atlanta) and the second-lowest rated Daytona 500.
     
    DC-93 likes this.
  4. Beentherebefore

    Beentherebefore Active Member Level III Supporter

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    I was just reading in the WSJ last week that all major sports TV viewership is down - MLB, "March Madness", and even "Monday Night Football". That doesn't mean that overall interest and support is waning but that many viewers are migrating to viewing their favorite sports on "modern social media". It's not my idea of fun to view my favorite sports on the small screens of personal devices but, then again, I'm not of the generation that barely ever looks up from their i-phones.
     
    AvengerGuy likes this.
  5. Beentherebefore

    Beentherebefore Active Member Level III Supporter

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    That's the exact point that several members of this board (including myself) made when Dodge dropped out in 2012.

    Exposure in (still) the largest and most viewed US motorsports series. A consistent presence in major motorsports series builds a performance reputation for the brand, especially for younger (pre-car ownership) fans attending races with their families. Dodge has consistently been supporting the Nascar races with TV ads for years so they obviously see value in trying to market to Nascar fans. Supporting a series which features your main market competitors without actually participating yourself is marketing insanity.

    Yes it is and withdrawing from virtually all major US motorsports series (except NHRA) contributed to that, imo. Now I am hearing from some Nascar fans that I know (whether they like Dodges or not) that they suspect that FCA doesn't want to spend any marketing $$$ to back Dodges in Nascar because they don't plan to be selling Dodge coupe/sedan type vehicles much longer. It's hard to dispute that kind of logic these days.
     
  6. unverferth

    unverferth Active Member

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    Not to mention....starting next week the race will be shown on Fox Sports 1 and then down the road NBCSN. These channels are usually part of the 'premium' set-up on most cable outlets. A lot of people including myself don't buy the 'premium' for a lot of reasons. So we don't watch the races.
     
  7. mopar22

    mopar22 Member

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    I think a lot of people watch live streams now too. The only time i was a game through cable is if i'm out and about at a restaurant. All my hockey and football games were through streams other then a select few
     
  8. Mike V.

    Mike V. Moderator

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    Actually you are missing a few very specific keys component.

    Direct live streaming is counted towards ratings in many cases because the stream has identical advertising and watermarks of the traditional broadcast. All streamed NASCAR races require a cable provider subscription and can be counted by Neilsen (specific to Fox and FS1 Broadcasts, last year NBC may not have).

    Fox estimates a $397.6 million dollar revenue from sales of advertising during the NASCAR race. NBC is more conservative and estimates a 297.4 million dollar revenue (not including pre and post race coverage or side by side ads). This means Fox is breaking even on their NASCAR coverage and NBC is losing money ($140 million) on their NASCAR coverage. An average 30 second spot costs an advertiser $187,650 on Fox and $123,000 on NBC.

    And this is where the premium bundle come in, cable companies pays the networks for the right to broadcast, this is where the real money is for the networks. The cable company bundles and charge a premium for the networks (and the live streaming) and the networks get paid the subscription fee.

    If ratings continue to fall (roughly 1/3 from peak) and people continue to cut the cable company cords... the big windfall from the networks that NASCAR is riding on will continue to dwindle. The tracks are already having to cut costs, like removing seats for tax purposes.

    For the TV networks, NASCAR is great because it provides subscription fees. For advertisers it's luke warm because the ratings continue to drop while the advertising costs have increased to float the big network deal. Turner already walked away from NASCAR because cost for the deal was more than they would make on advertising and subscriptions. ESPN/ABC did not even make an offer on the last go round and publicly stated the opening cost for the rights was too high. NBC is losing money on advertising but still making a profit on the subscriptions. Fox is breaking even on advertising and making money on the subscriptions. There is a point where the networks will be losing more on advertising than they are making from the subscription fees (Turner and ABC/ESPN have confirmed this).

    The overnight ratings for the Phoenix race was absolutely dismal. Advertisers are not going to keep pumping money into the system if the viewership continues to decline.

    Mike
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2017 at 5:30 PM
    GasAxe and DC-93 like this.
  9. Mike V.

    Mike V. Moderator

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    To be clear those live stream can and are counted towards ratings in many cases

    Mike
     
    DC-93 likes this.
  10. Mike V.

    Mike V. Moderator

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    Overnight ratings for Phoenix were a 12 year record low down 17% from 2016 and down 21% from 2015. It was substantially worse than the previous low in 2009.

    It was also a full 1/2 point lower than last years race at Fontana that aired in competition with NCCA March Madness so that can't be used as an excuse.

    Ratings and viewership are in a freefall

    Mike
     
    DC-93 likes this.
  11. Fast Eddie

    Fast Eddie Valued Member Level III Supporter

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    Lots of empty seats also when they showed the race from the air. This ain't good but I will watch anyway because I am a diehard fan. Love all the new kids racing now.
     
  12. mdh1776

    mdh1776 Member

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    Now we need a Dodge car for the next Elliott or Blaney to drive!
     
  13. mopar22

    mopar22 Member

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    Both are already split between chevy and ford so that might be an issue
     
  14. Doug D

    Doug D Virginia Gentleman

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    How many were watching from the nearby mountain? Betcha' they weren't counted.........
     
  15. GaryS

    GaryS Active Member

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    Further decreased attendance would likely work in favor of Dodge as far as shortening the time needed to announce.

    NASCAR would certainly be reluctant to drag their feet if anything can be done to slow the fan downslide. Approving the Infinity Challenger by upgrading to the 2018 styling would be a quick way to get a body style they can work with.

    Maybe even accepting the Pinty Hemi with modifications deserves consideration. That wouldn't be anything to give a performance advantage, and it would definitely get bored fans talking and speculating again. As Dale senior said, he didn't care if they loved him or hated him, at least they were talking about him and that's what Dodge would need to quickly benefit from the sport.

    Two years down the road, all the brands will likely be restyled, and move closer to the stock looks that all the manufacturers are asking for.That would give Dodge time to start from scratch.