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Doug Demuro on PT Cruiser and his age and lack of experience with cars

Discussion in 'Mopar News' started by FThorn, Jan 10, 2020.

?

Your opinion on PTs?

This poll will close on Mar 27, 2020 at 1:02 PM.
  1. more positive than negative

    94.6%
  2. more negative than positive

    5.4%
  1. CudaPete

    Ad-Free Member

    Joined:
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    IMO, when it became available, I think the 2.4WE, would have been a good choice to put in the PT. It would have easily fit, offered better power and economy, used a timing chain rather than a timing belt, and plugs were a breeze to change.
     
    FThorn likes this.
  2. 06PTElectricBlue

    06PTElectricBlue Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2019
    Messages:
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    In its heyday, the PT just screamed, "Please, do something special with me!" and there were many more accessories for, and the Gen1 was much more appropriate for modding, over the Gen2 :cool:

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    A PT also looks good with a 2-tone paint scheme :cool:

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    FThorn, djsamuel and ScramFan like this.
  3. Ammo Alamo

    Ammo Alamo Member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2020
    Messages:
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    My wife decided to buy a 2005 PT Limited, used. I was initially against it, but she was so adamant that I went along in the interest of family peace. Now, thirteen years later, I love the little beastie. The seats are a bit close together side by side, but the seat width and height, front leg room, and arm rests are perfect for me at 6' and my wife at 5'8". Once you learn to give the accelerator a proper kick to downshift the automatic it has plenty of power for normal driving. We have had one problem in all those years, The interior space behind the front seats is adjustable, the rear 60-40 seats come out and go back in easily (if you can lift 60 lbs) so the big dog has a nice place to lay when taking her to the vet. I replaced the gas struts on the tail, no problem and fairly cheap, so it is our daily driver which we also once drove to Canada 2000 miles round trip.

    I am not surprised to see 94% + positives on this survey. There are a lot of PTs still running strong in my small county north of Dallas near the OK border. My daughter, who drives only short distances like we do, has been through three or four cars in the past ten years, and we have had reliable service from out Petey for close to fifteen.

    Our 2005 PT Cruiser Limited, 4-cyl automatic, Vanilla color, is still great, though its 22 mpg actual is nothing to write home about. Except for occasional codes that take minor fixes like a new gas cap or cheap sensor it has been very reliable, knock on wood. We did learn the hard way to quit using a local tire dealer who apparently had a source for name-brand tires of questionable quality, which causes us to have all sorts of tire problems. Now all new tires come from WalMart, because we can get them rotated or serviced almost anywhere. Walmart is now our service choice for batteries, oil changes, and tires.

    However, now Petey's horn is not working, and I have to assume it could be the clockspring. I cold change it, but I can’t find a cheap aftermarket clockspring, so I anticipate eliminating the steering wheel horn circuit, and installing a bypass horn button.

    The biggest problem now is age (mine, and the car's) and service. At 70 I can no longer manhandle parts replacement like I could thirty years ago. Unfortunately, experience has shown me that the local Chrysler dealer, Jim Hodge Motor Company, is not to be trusted, and after talking to the service department the local Toyota dealer isn't looking much better. The next closest Chrysler dealer is 60 miles away.

    We can expect more service to be needed going forward, with a limited number of sources for aftermarket parts.
    Go, little Petey, go! We are too old and too poor to afford a new car! We just need you to last until we are a hundred, about thirty years from now…
     
    somber, dana44, gforce2002 and 3 others like this.
  4. Nuts&Bolts

    Nuts&Bolts Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2020
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    1
    Glad I'm not the only one who doesn't think much of Doug - he seems to be quite keen on bandwagoning. I have also to say that I find his delivery very irritating; he seems to lack any sense of humour, and treats minor faults and flaws as if they're the end of the world.

    Can't complain about reliability on mine ('02 manual with the 2L); she's just gone into the works to have her clutch hydraulics replaced wholesale. It's costing me £500 or so, but considering they've been in there since she left Toluca and the fluid's the colour of brown ale, I'm impressed. A surprising amount of the car is original, actually; she seems pretty solidly built to me. There are definitely weak points (the front suspension really hates twisty British roads, especially now they have lots of potholes), but overall, for a nearly 20-year-old car, she's held up pretty well. I'm especially impressed by the lack of corrosion on the bodywork. Have to say though, that my folks' '05 Toyota has needed almost no work on it in ten years; my PT, by contrast, has had to have the front wishbones and drop-links done, the rear shocks replaced, an ABS sensor replaced, two new sets of track rods, and three sets of welding on her sills, and that's having done 15,000 miles fewer. The quality difference is definitely there.

    People don't appear to grasp what the PT Cruiser is for: cruising. It's not the quickest off the line, but it's very happy to amble along at between 60 and 80mph for hour after hour. On the manual, both 4th and 5th gears are overdrive, I'm guessing to facilitate easy cruising at either restricted highway speeds (50-60) or proper highway speeds (70-80) in reasonable proximity to the power band, while not constantly running the engine hard. Its suspension is softer than a lot of other cars; that makes it very comfortable for multiple-hour stints. Its steering is very light and quite precise, once you get the feel for it; I'm always delighted by the fact you can drive the PT with a single finger at speed. Its front seats (less so its rear ones) are supremely comfortable - that armrest for the driver, alone, is a stroke of genius - and everything necessary's within easy reach without needing to move an inch. The longest I've driven mine is 4h without a break, and at the end I felt absolutely fine. In the diesel Pug I learned on, an hour in the seat gave me gorilla arm!

    One thing that really baffles me is why people complain about its power, or lack thereof. A 0-60 time of 10-12 seconds (engine and gearbox depending) is really not a problem unless you're trying to get up to 60 in under ten seconds. An hp:t of about 97 is not disrespectable, especially for its era. Sure, it's not going to outpace someone in a big saloon with a 4L under the bonnet; it's not designed to, and in any case, the practical limit on road speed is usually imposed by laws, traffic, and conditions long before you hit the limit of the car's performance. Wind that little 2L out to 2,500rpm or above and it'll pull you along quite happily. Maybe the automatics struggled a bit to get the change times right (I had to train myself to rev the engine to 2,500 or so before changing up, having learned to drive on a diesel), or maybe the complainers, like DeMuro, are too busy mucking about in supercars that 99.5% of the populace will never touch.
     
    FThorn likes this.

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