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Driving home tonight and all of a sudden massive oil leak!!!

Discussion in 'Grand Cherokee, Durango, etc' started by phinxter, Dec 28, 2017.

  1. phinxter

    phinxter Active Member

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    Yeah so my Jeep GC 4.7 just puked oil everywhere. I left from work, it was about 5 deg F. Warmed it up for about 3 minutes drove about 30mph for a few minutes and then I smelled oil burning. Thought it was just some old POS burning oil in front of me. Got on the highway and saw a fog behind me. Drove it about 10 miles and decided to pull into a gas station. Under hood oil puked out of the valve covers. Underneath it was dripping from the back side of the oil pan. (BTW I have patched the pan a few times and put off replacing it) i removed the oil cap and the normal watery/sludgy gunk that you normally find there was frozen. So I'm thinking my PCV system may have been frozen and caused a lot of pressure in the crankcase and it blew out that oil. Seen that on other engines, just not to that degree. So as it's running there is a steady drip from underneath on the exhaust. Has anybody experienced this on a 4.7?. :(
     
  2. ImperialCrown

    Level III Supporter

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    The severe cold in parts of the country has made life difficult for many vehicles. Condensation freezing in the PCV can happen with almost any car.
    The 3.7L/4.7L oil filler pipe is susceptible to condensation and 'mayonnaise' emulsion build up. In winter and short trip driving it gets worse. In summer and on long trips when the engine fully warms up, you may not see it.
    Some customers were concerned that the head gasket had failed when they saw it, but that generally isn't the case.
    There should be a baffle in the fill pipe. Sometimes this baffle is missing if it doesn't get put back in after an oil change.
    http://starparts.chrysler.com/tsb/en_us/dto/pbd2/08/00/22/080022dc80bc0964.pdf
    This baffle hides the ugly build-up and serves to warm the PCV.
     
  3. phinxter

    phinxter Active Member

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    Well got it towed to my shop. allowed to thaw a bit, there was oil sprayed all the way to the rear glass what a mess. cleaned it up, removed the pcv valve and cleaned that. Didn't see any leaks other than the leaky oil pan mentioned before. Your right about this cold weather causing problems, I drive about 30 interstate miles each way and have seen more dead cars than usual. Don't know why I have so much moisture in the engine since it is driven so far and plenty warm enough to boil off that moisture. Any ideas to prevent that again? Would a catch can help?
     
  4. ImperialCrown

    Level III Supporter

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    For every 8 gallons of gasoline burned, 1 gallon of water is produced. Some of this turns to blow-by (vapor) and has to be removed by the PCV. In cold weather, much of this vapor condenses into liquid water inside the engine which the PCV has a harder time removing.
    Use of a premium-quality conventional motor oil (not necessarily synthetic) and more frequent oil changes is better in winter as it seals the rings better to reduce blow-by gases.
    Look for a motor oil that meets Chrysler MS-6395 and is API certified. A 5W-30 should be good for low temperatures.

    Motor Oil: Certification: Chrysler MS-6395 | Jeep Off Road Adventures (at http://jeepoffroadadventures.com/wp/?page_id=787 )

    Oil Categories (at http://www.api.org/products-and-services/engine-oil/eolcs-categories-and-documents/oil-categories )

    Long trips and warmer temperatures generally help to 'burn-off' this moisture much better. I think that your engine itself is OK.
     
    wtxiceman and phinxter like this.
  5. phinxter

    phinxter Active Member

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    I'm currently using A DEXOS1 spec 5W-30 that is in bulk tanks. Not sure if it is Chrysler MS-6395 certified. Back when I first bought it and first oil change I was using a conventional oil. When it got really cold one day I started it up and heard a loud lifter (or lash adjuster if you like) tick. That was 5 years ago and have used synthetic blend or synthetic ever since, and never heard that tick again, but piston slap on cold mornings yikes that's another story.
     
  6. GLHS60

    GLHS60 Well-Known Member

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    Some vehicles used a heated PCV hose to deal with the hose icing/freezing up.

    Might be something to consider.

    Thanks
    Randy
     
  7. phinxter

    phinxter Active Member

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    ImperialCrown I cam across this TSB 25-002-08. It doesn't list my year model but similar Ram, dakota, durango. Do you know anything about it?
    GLHS60 If there is one for my application I'm interested.
     
  8. ImperialCrown

    Level III Supporter

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    It cover 2005 WK, but not 2004 WJ for some reason. I wonder what is different?:
    http://www.wkjeeps.com/TSB/tsb_wk_2500208.pdf
    From the TSB part numbers, the special PCV looks like this:
    PCV Valve Mopar 53032925AC | eBay (at https://www.ebay.com/p/PCV-Valve-Mopar-53032925AC/74411712 )
    The new filler tube looks like this:
    53020891AE - Mopar Parts Giant (at https://www.moparpartsgiant.com/parts/mopar-valve-oil-fill~53020891ae.html?Make=Jeep&Model=Grand+Cherokee&Year=2004&Submodel=&Filter=() )

    It is the same general idea of preventing iced PCV valves.
    Heated PCV has been adapted to some engines where arctic climate and engine characteristics caused this freezing issue. We see some of these PCV heaters on Canadian vehicles.
    The 2.7L used engine coolant in a heat exchanger to warm the incoming crankcase blow-by flow. The old 2.2L/2.5L used a piece of metal pipe secured to an exhaust manifold stud for heat.
    Foil/fiberglass insulated sleeving can be slipped over the existing rubber PCV hose to hold heat in.
    Hopefully this deep freeze will over soon. Cars hate this weather. The cat won't go out. As long as you are aware and fore-warned that this freezing can happen, you will know next time it may happen. Wiping the sludge and water out of the oil filler tube may help keep it from happening until the weather warms up.
     
  9. GLHS60

    GLHS60 Well-Known Member

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    Also, I Remember the early 3.0 Minivans had a freezing PCV hose issue.

    I believe the cure was an insulated hose with a "gummy" look.

    Thanks
    Randy
     

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