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Eight-speed transmission repairs

Discussion in 'Car Dealer Hangout' started by Dave Z, Dec 24, 2015.

  1. ImperialCrown

    Level III Supporter

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    Yes. Knowing the fluid temperature will change the transmission operation/shift schedule to enhance quick warm-up or to speed the rapid cooling of the fluid when desirable.
    Most recent vehicles have an ATF temperature (over-temp) warning light:
    transmission_temperature_warning.gif
    There is also a 'worn-out ATF' fault code (P0897) for when the fluid 'deteriorates' beyond a certain point:
    http://www.autocodes.com/p0897_chrysler.html
    Having software that can help extend transmission life and alert you to operational situations and maintenance needs is a big plus.
    In most cases the automatic transmission/transaxle should last the life of the car. 15 or 20 years ago this may not have been the case.
     
    Dave Z likes this.
  2. AC TC

    AC TC Well-Known Member

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    This is a dangerous route to go.
    - its impossibel to meet atf+4 and dex3/ dex6 at the same time.
    It may however just work fine, there are many people using universal atf´s with sucsess out there.
    My valints 904 works fine with atf +4 so i se no need for the uni atf choice.
     
  3. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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    It was probably Dex5 since I got it a couple of/a few years ago.
     
  4. moparroy

    moparroy Member

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    I would say after 1996 that may be true but I had 3 hard failures on the A606 / 42LE in my 1995 Intrepid (same guts mostly) - all of which were fixed with upgrades in 1996 or there abouts. First was a plastic accumulator piston - understand there was a bulletin on that - I was disappointed to see a plastic part in there for sure. Second was the front planet spline stripped - was heat treated / hardened in later models - most recent last year was the carrier for the rear planet - sheared right off - later units use a 5 planet set up vs the original 4. But I am happy to say our 1996 GV while the original owner had a warranty trans replacement, I had no further issues with it and our 99 T&C is around 200,000 miles on the original tranny with no issue. In the 96 I actually ran dextron in it for a couple days - the cooler line let go on the road (actually happened twice with that van on Florida trips) - first time I towed it - second time we coasted to a Walgreens and all they had was dextron which I used to get to the hotel that night - I did transfuse it a day or two later with ATF+4.
     
  5. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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    Minivans were the toughest application for those things, by all means... you are probably right.
     
  6. ImperialCrown

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    Agree. We rarely saw 41TE failures in the lighter, 4-cyl cars. The heavier minivans with the torquey V6 engines had the most failures.
    There were ongoing refinements to 41TE throughout the '90's. In fact, the shop policy was to install a reman (with all the updates already inside) on anything older than a 1994. Installing the updated hard parts individually would be cost-prohibitive.
    The 62TE had compounder issues when first introduced for the first couple of years. This was attributed to a vendor bearing issue and resolved. It is situated low in the transaxle but doesn't sit in oil and spins rapidly in OD ranges, so it does need plenty of oil.
    All automatic transaxles have had progressive software tweaks that have helped shift quality and overall transaxle longevity.
     

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