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Electric Viper and Hellcat?

Discussion in 'Mopar News' started by Charger, Mar 31, 2020.

  1. voiceofstl

    voiceofstl Well-Known Member

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    i JUST SAID "MID SIZER" WHICH TODAY A CAR MEANS A CUV.
     
  2. 55Plaza

    55Plaza Well-Known Member

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    The last time I actually bought gas was Jan 25th ... but my Durango is ready to go when I am. Can an electric vehicle sit for 11+ weeks without being plugged in and be ready to go?
     
  3. somber

    somber 370,000 miles

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    For over 30 years I've wanted an electric car, but just additional range and more charging stations isn't enough for me. It must also be price competitive with a comparable ICE vehicle , and I think it may take longer than 3 years for prices to come down enough. I'm also not happy with the fire hazard that exists with current battery packs.

    I believe electrics will eventually be superior in just about every way to ICE - lower maintenance, more reliable, lower cost, better performance, more convenient, safer. Key will be battery advancements, and the coming solid state battery tech is pretty exciting.
     
    MJAB, cdjr77, Dave Z and 2 others like this.
  4. Zagnut27

    Zagnut27 Jeepaholic

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    About the only one of our current vehicles that MIGHT be able to sit that long is my wife’s Encore. Our A3 generates more alarms and warning lights than I can keep track of (I don’t trust it at all) and my Mustang will die if I let it sit for a week...parasitic drain going on that I haven’t had time to diagnose. I did install a battery cut-off switch, so there’s that...lol. I get what you’re saying, just our “fleet” ain’t up to snuff currently.

    I wouldn’t mind an electric vehicle at all, I just have to be comfortable that there are enough charging stations that I can charge whenever I need to. And what happens if you run out of charge while driving? Tow?
     
  5. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
    Staff Member Level III Supporter

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    Probably better than any German gasoline car...! Our fleet has been fine sitting around but VW-Audi has long had issues that prevent them from enduring long term storage. For a while if you didn't use your VW for three weeks, you'd have to get the computer replaced...
     
  6. KrisW

    KrisW Well-Known Member

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    Fire hazard is a Tesla problem. Everyone else uses a far more stable kind of battery chemistry that is no more fire prone than a tank of gasoline.
     
    MJAB, T_690 and Dave Z like this.
  7. Max Wedge

    Max Wedge Well-Known Member

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    What do they use Lithium Polymer or Lithium Phosphate? If they are anything like the Lipo battaries in the modern RC cars I dont doubt the fire hazard.
     
  8. somber

    somber 370,000 miles

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    The price target for automotive battery packs where electric becomes cost-competitive with ICE is considered to be around $100 per kilowatt-hour. Today's price is around $150/kwh. This Bloomberg New Energy Finance report from last year was projecting sub-$100/kwh by 2024, but I've since read that they've brought the projection in another year, expecting to break $100/kwh by 2023. I would expect that by then the value proposition for electric cars will be much better (but I'm still waiting for the fire safety of solid state).

    Here's a layman-level article from yesterday about a project working on solid state batteries using ceramic electrolyte. There is discussion on how important reducing operating temperature is (with current batteries around 80 degrees C).
     
    Dave Z and MJAB like this.
  9. Ryan

    Ryan Moderator
    Staff Member Level III Supporter

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