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Fiat Chrysler in Talks With Hyundai on Partnership

Discussion in 'Mopar News' started by romalerig, Dec 2, 2017.

  1. CivoLee

    CivoLee Active Member

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    I'd rather have hydrogen fuel-converted ICE cars than a bunch of boringly silent EVs...
     
    77 Monaco Brougham and dakota21 like this.
  2. xjgary

    xjgary Active Member

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    YES! Hydrogen fuel cells would be extremely efficient. So use them to make on-board electricity and power the electric motors that will propel most cars in the near future.
     
    77 Monaco Brougham likes this.
  3. Deckard_Cain

    Deckard_Cain Active Member

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    If this allows them to bring new compact and midsize sedans as well, it would be great.
    Ot maybe some compact-SUVs to other regions besides North America.
     
  4. T_690

    T_690 Active Member

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    But with FCA engines. Hyundai engines usually have poor real life fuel economy.
     
    Prabhjot and Deckard_Cain like this.
  5. dodgeatheart

    dodgeatheart Not THAT guy again!

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    Nothing new to see here is there? I thought current 4 cyl engines were co-developed with Hyundai? Didn't FCA use Hyundai 6 speed autos when the Jatco CVT's weren't cutting the mustard in the Patriot and Compass?

    I'm not sure this is true any more. Two family members currently own Kias (Sportage 2.0T and Sedona) and both report better than EPA fuel economy.
     
  6. valiant67

    valiant67 Rich Corinthian Leather
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    Yep the wonderful GEMA engine that Hyundai, Chrysler and Mitsubishi teamed up for.
     
  7. Erik Latranyi

    Level III Supporter

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    That Daimler screwed up for the Chrysler version.
     
  8. 62 dodge lancer

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    bad dam move stop talking about partnering, work on dodge only!
     
  9. link3721

    link3721 Yes, This MK Goes Off-Road
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    Other than being thirsty, were there any really any long term durability issues with the world engines? I feel like a lot of the criticism comes from being used in heavier vehicles and thus giving an "underpowered" feeling. Reliability-wise, I've not really heard horror stories.
     
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  10. mopar22

    mopar22 Well-Known Member

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    You do know this helps everyone right? They work on things together
     
  11. suzq044

    suzq044 Resident Photoshop Nerd

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    Underpowered and noisy, I think are the only real 'complaints'. Though, even in the Dart, I think it was more that people were expecting higher performance out of a Dodge, than what was given.
     
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  12. Erik Latranyi

    Level III Supporter

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    Yes, they seem to be decent. But fuel economy, noise and power were all below industry rivals who moved to smaller displacement turbo engines. FCA is just getting there and it will take 2-3 years before the Hurricane is rolled out across the lineup. Meanwhile, Ford is on its 2nd generation EcoBoost.
     
    valiant67 likes this.
  13. T_690

    T_690 Active Member

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    2.0 turbo is not a substitute for 2.4 liter naturally aspirated engine.

    So, what will replace 2.4 liter naturally aspirated engine? Could that be ahigh compression 2.0 liter naturally aspirated GME? Or maybe 1.3 liter turbo GSE with or without mild hybrid set-up?

    AFAIK there is no Hurricane. If FCA is calling it a GME I don't know a reason why we should use an unofficial names.
     
  14. Erik Latranyi

    Level III Supporter

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    Four cylinder engines of over 2 liter displacement are going away. To get performance from a 1.3 liter in the US, you need a turbo or the vehicle will deliver unsatisfactory acceleration and performance.

    This is not Europe.
     
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  15. T_690

    T_690 Active Member

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    Who mentioned 1.3 without turbo? Hmh.
     
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  16. mopar22

    mopar22 Well-Known Member

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    The 2.4 is an alright engine. Just use the 2.0t with regular fuel if you don't want to pay for the premium
     
  17. redriderbob

    redriderbob Mopar Guru!
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    FCA discussing tech partnership with Hyundai, but no merger

    of-fiat-and-chairman-of-ferrari-sergio-marchionne-gives-a-speech-the-picture-id884395766.jpeg

    Fiat Chrysler Automobiles is in talks with South Korea's Hyundai about a technical partnership, but there are no merger talks between the two, FCA Chief Executive Sergio Marchionne said on Saturday. FCA is often the subject of merger speculation, especially after its unsuccessful 2015 attempt to tie up with larger U.S. rival GM. Its share price jumped to record highs in August after reports of interest from China and Hyundai.

    "We already buy components from (Hyundai) .... let's see if we can agree on other points, especially for the development of transmissions and hydrogen," Marchionne told journalists, adding there was "nothing to announce for the moment".

    Asked whether this collaboration could turn into a merger, Marchionne said: "I don't believe so". (Reporting by Agnieszka Flak; editing by Alexander Smith)


    FCA discussing tech partnership with Hyundai, but no merger (at https://www.autoblog.com/2017/12/03/fiat-chrysler-hyundai-tech-partnership/ )
     
  18. Muther

    Muther Well-Known Member

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    Hydrogen is a waste of time. You are correct.
     
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  19. IronMike3406

    IronMike3406 Active Member

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    I don't think it is a waste of time. I don't think it is quite ready for mainstream vehicles either and the infrastructure isn't ready yet. With electrification of cars in general the United States isn't ready period we are so far behind in infrastructure compared to the Europe and other countries. Shell just announced in Europe they will have 80 charging systems up by 2019 and also they purchased New Motion out of the Netherlands with their 30,000 charging stations. Should be a real interesting to see what is in store here in the United States. But we always lag behind other countries because the US hates change.
     
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  20. Muther

    Muther Well-Known Member

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    Right right now, the momentum is with batteries. The US is the undisputed leader in the development of battery tech. That is unquestioned. That however does not neccesarily mean that we will lead in the manufacture of ultra high density batteries (that is almost certainly going to be China).

    Hydrogen has too many techno hurdles still to overcome. Batteries have already overcome thier techno issues; it is now just a matter of building the manufacturing to build the new (super duper) high density batteries.

    Hydrogen has potential, but that’s it. Just potential. Batteries have more than demonstrated their viability, and that is just with the current tech; imagine what happens when the new tech is in full production (lower weight, three to five to ten times the current energy density, recharge ten to twenty times faster, absolutely untouchable reliability).

    The biggest caveat I see is in mobile vs stationary battery systems. Stationary battery systems garner much higher margins than mobile systems, and the applications for stationary systems are about the explode (I am inside the industry). So, stationary systems could very well devour all of the battery production, leaving cars/trucks on the outside.

    For that reason, Elon built his very own super big battery factory. To be able to control his supply.
     
    xjgary, somber and DarkSky like this.

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