AF: Fuel taxes, road conditions, driving habits | Page 2 | Allpar Forums
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Fuel taxes, road conditions, driving habits

Discussion in 'Off Topic But Still Civil' started by T_690, Sep 2, 2020.

  1. jerseyjoe

    jerseyjoe Plymouth Makes It

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2002
    Messages:
    8,093
    Likes:
    2,190
    NJ raised fuel tax by around 10 cents, little guy always takes the hit.
     
  2. mopar22

    mopar22 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2010
    Messages:
    2,806
    Likes:
    2,172
    Illinois is far from great roads but they’re not bad. Both Michigan and Pennsylvania have worse roads though
     
    DC-93 likes this.
  3. Ryan

    Staff Member Level III Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2016
    Messages:
    6,890
    Likes:
    12,341
    You must not have driven in Oklahoma.
     
    DC-93 likes this.
  4. tabutler

    tabutler Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2019
    Messages:
    116
    Likes:
    197
    I live in Layton for four years. Illinois roads are much worse. :)
     
  5. Stéphane Dumas

    Stéphane Dumas Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2002
    Messages:
    3,479
    Likes:
    717
    That's because it's from a old joke with some parts of truth I once heard is when a driver from Quebec goes to Ontario/New England/New York State/New Brunswick and cross the border, his old jalopy feel suddenly like a more recent car.
     
  6. jerseyjoe

    jerseyjoe Plymouth Makes It

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2002
    Messages:
    8,093
    Likes:
    2,190
    Only roads halfway decent in New Jersey are the Turnpike,Parkway toll roads and high income areas.
     
  7. mopar22

    mopar22 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2010
    Messages:
    2,806
    Likes:
    2,172
    That’s more than Michigan at least. Michigan now lures you in with a failed sense of security since they have the state lines fixed but after a few miles they turn back into their old ways
     
    DC-93 likes this.
  8. jerseyjoe

    jerseyjoe Plymouth Makes It

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2002
    Messages:
    8,093
    Likes:
    2,190
    Seems like your your politicians are more clever than ours. Best roads in NJ go past the "State House" front and highway. Go a mile or two and its the pits.
     
    DC-93 likes this.
  9. 77 Monaco Brougham

    77 Monaco Brougham Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2017
    Messages:
    2,296
    Likes:
    3,568
    We have the same joke in Rhode Island. Just replace the place names with 'Massachusetts' and 'Connecticut'.:D
     
    DC-93 likes this.
  10. Zagnut27

    Zagnut27 Jeepaholic

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2015
    Messages:
    5,528
    Likes:
    10,909
    I95 up from Delaware to Philly is usually a cratered mess that looks like it's been carpet bombed. They just ripped it up to repave it, but the work is pretty shoddy...you can see the seams between the lanes where water will get trapped and turn it into a maze of potholes again before long. This is one of the many reasons why I'm a Jeep guy, because I feel like most of my highway commute is off-road. :D
     
    77 Monaco Brougham and djsamuel like this.
  11. valiant67

    valiant67 ...

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2003
    Messages:
    36,798
    Likes:
    19,608
    Face it, you can keep listing areas with poor roads. It's the case everywhere. In the US, often because of weather conditions but also because of poor planning.

    However, some of the absolute worst roads I've seen were in West Virginia. State routs that were one lane only in multiple places because landslides have caused one side of the road to collapse. Roads like this where school busses run every day - and the roads don't get fixed because it's one of the poorest states. I hated driving up to my camp site - the road was more of a path in places than a road - then once you left the state maintained roads and were on the county roads? Wow, they were something. Barely two cars wide, steep drop offs with no guard rails.
     
    #31 valiant67, Sep 10, 2020
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2020
    Dave Z likes this.
  12. DC-93

    DC-93 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2014
    Messages:
    3,205
    Likes:
    2,076
    Electric cars.

    Who’s going to pay to upgrade the entire power grid in the US??
     
  13. Ryan

    Staff Member Level III Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2016
    Messages:
    6,890
    Likes:
    12,341
    I took this picture this morning on the way to work. Rural county roads here are not maintained at all and every small amount of rain just completely floods the road. And to think I drove a Charger on these roads for several years.

    IMG_4736.JPG

    Oh well. I'll be done with my bachelor's degree in May and then planning to move to California, so I don't have much longer of dealing with this. :)
     
    Shane Estabrooks likes this.
  14. Bob Lincoln

    Bob Lincoln "CHECK FAULT CODES"
    Level 2 Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2002
    Messages:
    31,923
    Likes:
    5,243
    It has to happen, anyway. But in a more decentralized manner, because that's what's most appropriate for localized, renewable energy sources. Reduces outages for many millions of people at a time.
     
    77 Monaco Brougham and Ryan like this.
  15. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
    Staff Member Level III Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2001
    Messages:
    35,054
    Likes:
    20,847
    I agree with you. I think I said as much. I'm a believer in the carbon tax. My more conservative friends argued me into it back in the 1990s.

    I agree. It could use some federal support in one form or another. One of the big issues we have now is that the grids were not necessarily designed around security from foreign interference. Another is weakness in the face of increasing major weather events. Finally, there is the inability to really digest renewable energy, which is also a problem with nearly every fossil-fuel and nuclear plant. Modern European (and a few American) energy plants can ramp up and down relatively quickly, even starting up from nothing, so renewables can be the primary power source and natural gas, coal, and nuclear can be secondary. As we have it now, we shut down parts of the wind farms and solar panels because we cant' easily change output from traditional plants. (Or, if the operators are relatively clever, we have the surplus power from wind, solar, etc go into battery, pumped-water, or hydrogen storage, but there's a lot of waste and expense there.)
     
  16. DC-93

    DC-93 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2014
    Messages:
    3,205
    Likes:
    2,076
    Take some of that water with you to help put out fires.
     
    Ryan likes this.
  17. Ryan

    Staff Member Level III Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2016
    Messages:
    6,890
    Likes:
    12,341
    That's true. But living in tornado alley is not ideal either.
     
    DC-93 likes this.
  18. 77 Monaco Brougham

    77 Monaco Brougham Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2017
    Messages:
    2,296
    Likes:
    3,568
    Not only that, but a decentralized grid by its very nature would be less vulnerable to acts of terrorism or nature.

    While they're upgrading the grid, I hope they don't forget about hardening the equipment to make it less vulnerable to EM damage. We've been pretty lucky up to now...but...one of these days, the Sun will belch out a flare of some kind, and we run the risk of having our civilization sent right back to the 1830's.:eek::eek::eek:
     
    Dave Z likes this.
  19. DC-93

    DC-93 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2014
    Messages:
    3,205
    Likes:
    2,076
    Bigger chance for Putin to launch!!!
     
  20. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
    Staff Member Level III Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2001
    Messages:
    35,054
    Likes:
    20,847
    FWIW, back to the roads discussion, NJ road are indeed terrible other than the Turnpike and Parkway, which you pay for.
    Our fuel tax went up by 23, not 10, cents. It was calculated by adding inflation to the years since the last hike. Any sane person would make the gas tax rise with inflation - roadbuilding inflation, not fuel inflation.

    Our roads stink partly because the gas tax was so low for so long, and partly because in the USA we invariably just dump more blacktop onto the old blacktop or, Heaven help us, (in my town especially), onto concrete, wtihout any real preparation other than maybe scoring the old road. I just drove down our brand new multi-million-dollar repaved road and it was bumpier than the old one had been. More bumps means more places for water to collect means more potholes, quicker. Also we fix potholes with machines that just don't work... the new patch is gone in a week. (Our town decided to “fix” this by buying a second Crapmiester 5000).

    In Europe, they dig up the entire road and start over with gravel, and their roads are smoother and last longer.
     

Share This Page

Loading...
 We are not affiliated with FCA. We make no claims regarding validity or accuracy of information or advice. Copyright © VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.