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Future Chrysler 300 Speculation

Discussion in 'Rumors and Speculation' started by Terrymc1, Nov 13, 2017.

  1. GasAxe

    GasAxe Well-Known Member

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    I'm almost afraid to ask what you need to keep hidden in your trunk.:) I'm not too concerned with keeping items away from prying eyes, but I do prefer a trunk to keep items secure and not potentially flying around the cabin during an accident. I was happy to find the Durango has a little hide away trunk in the back that can hold a folding shovel, jumper cables, and first aid kit with plenty of room to spare.
     
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  2. somber

    somber 370,000 miles
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    There are FWD-based SUVs with transaxles out there also. People are gobbling up Chevy Traverses, Buick Enclaves, Honda Pilots, etc, but they wouldn't be caught dead in a minivan. It doesn't make a lot of sense to me.
     
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  3. somber

    somber 370,000 miles
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    I drive a Charger, but I don't feel that I'm "climbing out" of it in any way. I can sit sideways in the seat at normal chair height with both feet on the ground and just stand up. It feels the same as if I'm standing up from a chair at the kitchen table. Same for entry - I just sit down normally, then swing my legs under the wheel and I'm ready to go. I would say that access is much easier in my Charger than in my pickup. With my pickup I have to climb in, and getting out is a slow "fall" to the ground.
     
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  4. aldo90731

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    The 2-door coupe was given for dead before Ford launched the 2005 Mustang, and Dodge and Chevrolet followed suit. The RWD non-luxury sedan was dead until Chrysler launched the 2005 300C, with a good ole American HEMI V8 and all. The body-on-frame SUV was dead until Jeep added two doors to Wrangler.

    It is not the job of consumers to tell automakers how to do their jobs. It is the job of automakers to identify unmet consumer wants and needs, use vision and passion to articulate them so that they gain internal approval, and to execute on that vision brilliantly.

    Easier said than done, no doubt. But vision and passion still count for a lot in this industry, and consumers will reward handsomely the automaker that brings to market products that appeal to their inner wants, needs and aspirations.
     
    #24 aldo90731, Nov 15, 2017
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2017
  5. aldo90731

    Level III Supporter

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    In my personal opinion, the sedan started on a downward spiral when it shifted from RWD to FWD during the 1980s and 90s.

    At the time, GM as the market leader, shifted all its cars small, medium and large, to FWD configuration, forcing everyone else to follow suit. Chrysler derived much of its revenue from FWD. Ford scored a homerun with the original Taurus. And then Toyota took the entire sedan category by storm with the revolutionary 1992 Camry, by offering unparalleled levels of quality, refinement, affordability, safety, efficiency, competence and attractiveness wrapped into one. Camry is the product that turned Toyota into a household name in North America, and the blueprint for non-luxury sedans ever since.

    European automakers stubbornly stuck to their guns and held onto RWD sedans, naming superior handling characteristics and design proportions. In time, they were proven right. I cannot overstate the revolution that the 2005 Chrysler 300 represented in the marketplace. It single-handedly tripled Chrysler brand’s demand, and forced Ford and GM to reconsider their prior assessments. Now Kia is launching Stinger with much anticipation,

    Today, I similarly see Wrangler stubbornly sticking to body on frame in the face of a CUV revolution, naming superior capability characteristics. In time, we can expect CUVs to become commoditized transportation pods, while the BOF SUV continues to stand out as a more purposeful alternative.

    Unfortunately, I don’t see FCA having the chops to pull another revolution like 2005 300C. Although I would love to be proved wrong.
     
    #25 aldo90731, Nov 15, 2017
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2017
  6. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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    Chrysler actually was the first to decide to do the full shift, because their RWD cars had stopped being competitive — too much weight, mainly, compared to the totally redesigned mainstream GMs. The Volare/Aspen debacle killed their reputation in their best selling segment.

    The FWD sedan segment didn’t really start to fail for Chrysler, at least, until Daimler. The Neon and cloud cars did not sell as well as their predecessors, but carried much higher prices and profits (cost less to make and sold for more!).

    As far as I can tell, the RWD large cars were less profitable than the LH series, and sold in somewhat lower numbers. The cloud cars, well, we know what happened there; and the Neon’s second generation mess was caused by Chrysler itself but allowed to remain without change until they left. Then we got the adaptations from Mitsubishi and Hyundai...
     
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  7. unverferth

    unverferth Well-Known Member

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    Please don't let the 300 die.
    How about a new one with fins ;););) !!
     
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  8. Bob Lincoln

    Bob Lincoln "CHECK FAULT CODES"
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    Anything and everything. There are areas where your car will get broken into just for a $5 high.
    Let's say you buy a new TV and have another stop to make. Do you really want the box visible to anyone who walks by?
     
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  9. aldo90731

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    Yes, Chrysler was fine being a peripheral player with its K-car derivatives, at the time holding about 11% of the market. But GM entered the 1980s holding 50% of the market; its FWD Celebrities, Grand Ams, 88s, 98s, LeSabres, Centuries and Fleetwoods are what really ushered the entire market into the space Chrysler had been playing.

    I can't speak of profitability, but I recall reading that the reason Tom Gale pushed for LX to be RWD was precisely to enable Chrysler to charge a price premium above what by then had become a commoditized FWD sedan.

    Today, Dodge can affix a $65,000 price to a top-end RWD Charger, while Toyota and Acura struggle to charge more than $50,000 for a FWD Avalon and TLX.

    Bob Sheaves told me once that it doesn't really matter if a sedan starts as a FWD or RWD; what really matters is what the automaker is willing to do with it. And Audi proves his point: credibly pushing FWD --and AWD-- into a space long held by more desirable sedans. But to me Audi stands out as the exception, not the norm.
     
    #29 aldo90731, Nov 15, 2017
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2017
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  10. voiceofstl

    voiceofstl Well-Known Member

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    That must be 1 small TV.
     
  11. Bob Lincoln

    Bob Lincoln "CHECK FAULT CODES"
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    Depends on your perspective. We have a 32" TV in our living room, more than adequate, fits in a car trunk just fine.
    But I think you get my drift. Valuables in plain sight is NOT a good idea.
     
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  12. CherokeeVision

    CherokeeVision Well-Known Member

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    I personally consider all those types of vehicles as CUV's.
    Perhaps the spacing between the front wheels, engine and drivers seat presents driving and handling characteristics that are different enough that some prefer one over the other. Being more on top of the wheels and engine in a minivan can magnify the front end weight of a minivan. Spreading things out in a CUV may be enough to make the driving characteristics feel more stable or more conventional (what they are used to driving).
    Then there is the difference between being able to reach everything under the hood. Minivan packaging can make it hard to reach things if you do you own maintenance. Also with a minivan you are sitting closer to the front so drivers may simply feel more exposed and not as safe without more mass (length) in front of them.
     
  13. Bob Lincoln

    Bob Lincoln "CHECK FAULT CODES"
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    Can't find it on Youtube, but I remember as a teen in the 1970s, watching an Audi commercial where they interviewed either the CEO or technical head, I think he was a PhD, who was asked, why FWD? With a smarmy, smug look on his face, he said with a condescending tone, "It is better to pull than to push." It was so arrogant, I vowed I would never buy one, whether I could afford it or not.
     
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  14. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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    Chrysler's market share hasn't changed all that much since the 1960s. They would have been a true niche player with rear drive. Have you looked at the sales of the RWD cars when the new FWD cars came?

    It was an era when people valued efficiency. There is a reason that just about the entire world shifted. The packaging efficiencies were amazing. Eventually they were able to get rear wheel drive somewhat competitive again, but it's still a niche. Who still does compact RWD, outside of Germany?
     
  15. aldo90731

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    Alfa Romeo, Lexus, Infiniti, Jaguar.

    Yes, two oil crises in the 1970s did that to us.

    By the way, back in 2001 my friend’s BMW 328 delivered 30 MPG on the Hwy, and it was a hoot to drive. The Germans found a way to have their cake and eat it too. And the markets rewarded them for it.
     
    #35 aldo90731, Nov 15, 2017
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2017
  16. eggwhite93

    eggwhite93 Active Member

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    To be fair I am currently driving a VW Jetta GLI so the seats are quite a bit lower than the LX cars. I might could be happy in a Charger/300. I would have to look at them more.
     
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  17. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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    Ah. An automaker that almost died, one that had front wheel drive, and ... Jaguar, which has only recently started to be revived by Ford and Tata. Not a good sample group. Lexus was very successful, but they didn't launch until January 1989. Not exactly a competitor for Chrysler, either.
     
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  18. freshforged

    freshforged Well-Known Member

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    kinda like the Imperial concept from a few years ago?

    The modern Chrysler Imperial: plans, concepts, and current status (at https://www.allpar.com/cars/ly/imperial.html )
     
  19. aldo90731

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    Chrysler and GM also died, FWD, RWD, AWD, sedans, SUVs, pickups and all. Fiat almost died with no RWD cars. :)

    I don't think we can pin an entire automaker's success or failure to a single platform.
     
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  20. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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    Chrysler was incredibly successful until Daimler came. It wasn't front wheel drive that killed them; that's what drove their success... well, front wheel drive cars and rear wheel drive Jeeps and Dodge Rams.

    I will always agree that rear wheel drive is good for large high-end cars and for pickups. But claiming that FWD killed the car is way over the top. What killed the car is, I think, the critical mass for tall wagons and pickups, because to have a car made it hard to see around all the behemoths. Also, the crossovers often have better utility for families in terms of being able to pack a lot of crap in.
     
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