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HEMI CATCH CAN?

Discussion in 'Performance' started by limechallenger, Mar 21, 2016.

  1. limechallenger

    limechallenger Active Member

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    Just bought a 2014 Ram with the 5.7 HEMI, I've heard from various sources that installing a "catch can " could be beneficial the life of my motor? Just wondering what you guys have to say about it? Is this something that Chrysler forgot , or is it something that may be needed because of the use of synthetic oil? just curious! let your opinions fly!
     
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  2. stroudtom

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    I use 1 on my 2011 RAM which reminds me I need to dump it.
     
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  3. ptschett

    ptschett Well-Known Member

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    If it really needed it, I think it'd be there from the factory.
    I personally would not install one. Blow-by gas contains a lot of water vapor (from combustion), and I need to be able to drive my car in sub-freezing temperatures; catch cans create a place where the water vapor can freeze and fill the can with ice, potentially blocking the PCV system.
     
    #3 ptschett, Mar 21, 2016
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2016
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  4. stroudtom

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    Never had a problem with such.
     
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  5. Doug D

    Doug D Virginia Gentleman

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    My '06 1500 Hemi just rolled over 224K miles without a "catchcan" and is doing just fine. Other than replacing the EGR at ~50K miles, all it's needed is sparkplugs, air filter(s) and oil/filter changes on a regular basis.
     
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  6. ImperialCrown

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    The crankcase ventilation system should work fine without it. It is designed for good vapor/oil separation.
    Always use the recommended 'MS' spec/viscosity motor oil and an OEM PCV valve.
     
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  7. MPE426HEMI

    MPE426HEMI Well-Known Member

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    I do have one on my 5.7 The reason I use it is because I got tired of cleaning the throttle body, intake side. Since I have it on, it's been cleaner. I do catch oil in it and usually dump it oil change time. I only use my car about 1/2 dozen times a year, so it's not a daily driver. Do you need it? Nope. People who race use them due to the fact that they may have excessive blow by, depending on what they've done to their engines. (so I am told)
    There was a conversation a few years ago on another website, with SRT engineers and this question was asked. Their answer was that they couldn't tell anybody to do anything to their vehicles that would compromise or change the factory emission standards, but they hinted that it wouldn't hurt if anybody did run them, if they are racing, but they couldn't tell anyone or recommend it due to EPA. (If I remember correctly). And also that there'd really be no benefit for the average consumer. I am not 100% sure, but I think I remember an engineer from GM, at one time talking about the corvette and how they've incorporated/or are trying to put "Catch Can" /oil separator of sorts onto the factory engine, where the picked up oil is deposited elsewhere and collected without having it run onto the ground/or it's burned off elsewhere. (I think it's called the GM 1LE Cleanside Separator). I think in direct injection engines, this may be a concern in the GM area. The other problem is liability of the manufacturer. You can imagine the problem with having a consumer have to maintain this by dumping the collected oil, every so often and where to dump it. So, it makes sense that they don't have it on any vehicle. The engine will operate just fine without it, and have for years. Some people say ingested oil mist affects octane ratings and pre-ignition, but I certainly have no proof of that.
     
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  8. AC TC

    AC TC Well-Known Member

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    It may well be needed for high long time rpm use but i doubt its needed for more normal use.
    DI engines are much more sensitive on oilmist in the intake, they clogg in the intake path.
    Racing engines that runs high borderline compression is also sensible to oil in the intake.
    Diesel engines can do a "run away" if its a severe blowby, google diesel runaway for fun.
     
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  9. stroudtom

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    If you want to reduce oil in the intake charge do it. Benefit from less knock is more timing and a HEMi switching from 8cyc to 4cyc knocks...lots.
     
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  10. AC TC

    AC TC Well-Known Member

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    Source? Never heard of the hemi being a knocker before...
    Note that hemis have a "chatch can" built into the intake manifold were it separates fumes from fluids and draining fluids back to the engine and fumes will end up in the intake to get burned.
     
  11. Doug D

    Doug D Virginia Gentleman

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    Ummm......Mine never has knocked.....at all.......in 224K miles.....not once.......

    If a Hemi does knock you're not using 89 octane (recommended) and/or the knock sensor is faulty.
     
  12. valiant67

    valiant67 Rich Corinthian Leather
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    The Hemi isn't a "knocker" because of the engine management software retarding timing to get rid of the knock.
    That's why although the Hemi is designed for 89 octane, it doesn't knock on 87 either. It just cuts timing back.
     
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  13. LouJC

    LouJC Active Member

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    Never had a knock on mine either. I have read a lot about the need for catch cans over at jeep forum.com but even though I have not added one I have not had the issue of oil vapors collecting on the back side of the throttle plate to the point where it caused operational issues. I have used Syn oil since about 25k miles, now at about 90k miles.
     
  14. Doug D

    Doug D Virginia Gentleman

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    On that note I use 87 octane most of the time. No knocks. Though there is a power reduction, my seat-of-the-pants meter can't tell the difference. I'll use 89 octane if I know I'll be towing or have a heavy load. I didn't mind the 10 cent difference in price between 87 and 89 octane, but the last few years its been 30 cents difference which makes it $6 more on a 20 gallon fill up.

    No issues with the back side of the throttle plate being dirty to the point it has caused operational issues. I've used conventional oil for its entire life of 10 years and 224K miles.
     
  15. stroudtom

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    Has anyone commenting here monitored the knock sensor with a scan gauge?
     
  16. MPE426HEMI

    MPE426HEMI Well-Known Member

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    My 5.7 is non-VVT and has the egr. I catch oil in the catch (prob a couple oz) everytime I change the oil. The dirt on the backside of my throttle plate could also be from the egr because it enters right behind the throttle body. There is an oil separator of sorts built into the 5.7 intake, where the PCV valve is installed, but whatever that misses, I collect into the can. I believe the egr would dirt up the intake more however. You don't need it, but I like it. If there was no oil showing up in it at all, when I checked, I'd have to liken it to snake oil. But it does collect oil, it proves it everytime I take it off.
    I've never monitored knock on my 5.7 with the scan gauge I have, but maybe I will try it this summer and see.
     
    #16 MPE426HEMI, Mar 25, 2016
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2016

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