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HEMIS are gone after 2019?

Discussion in 'Mopar / FCA News' started by dakrt99, Aug 19, 2015.

  1. WXman

    WXman Active Member

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    The end of the V8 has been nigh since the early 1970s fuel crisis. Or so they've been saying....

    I believe "the more things change, the more they stay the same" has some truth to it.
     
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  2. aldo90731

    Staff Member Level III Supporter

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    Then, how about the DEMI-HEMI?

    And they can hire DEMI Moore as spokesperson. I hear she is looking for a gig to show off her latest surgically enhanced investments...
     
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  3. Rick Anderson

    Rick Anderson Well-Known Member

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    But, for a few years in the 80's and several times in 21st century, fuel has been cheaper than it was in the 60's (corrected for inflation). But since the early 70's fuel supply (directly related to price) has been volatile. That has turned the U.S. auto industry upside down several times with foreign manufacturers gaining an advantage. That and regulation killing big performance engines, like V8's.

    We keep ignoring another factor, that is the improvements of V6's, and I think that is a huge factor. There are a lot of vehicles and market segments that a V8 really has little prestige, the buyer just wants the power he needs, a V6 is just fine with them. You'd see more and more V6's fitting the bill there.

    My guess, there will always be some demand for a V8, there will always certain market segments that it carries huge prestige and demand, the manufacturers will meet the market demand. V8's will probably have to change and transform, but its possible they survive in some form.
     
  4. Robert Johnson

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    Exactly. I think eventually the V8 will be the engine avail only on low production/high priced cars. I have had a ton of V8s in my life and liked all of them, but the past few cars have been 6s and turbo 4s and I have been perfectly happy with them. As long as the car performs to my expectations, I am happy, the cyl count does not matter to me; especially after riding and driving my son in laws F150 3.5EB. It blows away NA V8s while towing in the Sierras up to Tahoe and Reno.

    We all know that FCA can produce excellent V8s and V6s, not the challenge is to produce a class competitive 4cyl.
     
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  5. crouchta

    crouchta Well-Known Member

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    Actually, I at one point in time had a picture of a factory Hemi badge on a Reliant..... The engine was the optional 2.6 four cylinder. Obviously didn't "market" well, because I don't recall ever seeing it again.
     
  6. burtstwins

    burtstwins Well-Known Member

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    Like this

    upload_2016-4-12_21-34-7.jpeg
     
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  7. Bearhawke

    Bearhawke Things happen for a reason

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    V6: more and more FWD vehicles seem to be dropping that motor in favor of inline Fours that put out some serious power.

    V8: it has had street cred since 1932 if discussing 'low priced' cars and trucks starting with Ford. I'm starting to suspect the Eight may outlive the V6 when it's all said and done at the end of the IC engine era.
     
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  8. Mike V.

    Mike V. Mopar-nac The Moderator

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    Mitsubishi 4G54B SOHC 8 valve four cylinder engine.

    It was used in many many Chrysler and Mitsubishi products in the 70's, 80's, and into the 90's

    Mike
     
  9. valiant67

    valiant67 ...

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    The 2.6 was around a lot longer than the "2.6 Hemi" badge!
     
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  10. Rick Anderson

    Rick Anderson Well-Known Member

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    If you look at the cylinder head of the 2.6L, it wasn't that much of a stretch. But clearly, an Aries HEMI wasn't doing 1/4 miles anything close to a '69 Road Runner HEMI, so the name took on more meaning than simply the head design.

    The 2.0L SOHC&DOHC I4 from the Neon's had 4 valves per cylinder, opposed and inclined like the hemi, but a Pent-roof design, sorta like a faceted semi-hemisphere. And I heard Neon enthusiast try to describe the engine as a "Semi-Hemi", I just shook my head.

    It would be interesting to see the results of a poll about what HEMI means, I have a feeling only a minority actually knows what it means and assume its a marketing term (which arguably it has become) for a powerful engine, that does something Hemi-ish to add some more power.
     
  11. Rick Anderson

    Rick Anderson Well-Known Member

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    6 cylinders have lots of street cred in foreign brands, and domestic its street cred continues to grow.

    I think what you'll see will be a lot like what you say, but one engine won't be squeezed out, instead each engine will be promoted to the next level market niche, because technology will improve their performance up an additional tier. Which is what we have now, in the 60's & 70's, I4's were as common as I3's are today, 6cyl filled the niche that 4cyl do today, small block V8 fill the niche that 6cyl do today, and big block V8's filled the niche that modern V8's barely larger than the old small blocks do today.

    So we'll see more I4's, filling more spots that used to be V6's, more V6's filling spots that used to be V8 and (I don't think the V8 will die) but they will become less common and more exotic. Don't forget, in the distant past there were V-12's and V-16's, and there were V-12's in some exotic cars NOT so long ago, they are just about dead now.
     
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  12. WXman

    WXman Active Member

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    I'm not a salesman, but in college I was taught that if you work in sales, the main thing you want to do is get the customer to experience the product. If you appeal to a person's senses, and they are pleased, then they want the product. There is no question that a V8 engine appeals to the senses more. The sound, the feel of that low end torque, the V8 just arouses a person in ways a 4 or 6 can't. And at the end of the day, these automakers are in business to make money, right? That's why I don't see the V8 going away.
     
  13. crouchta

    crouchta Well-Known Member

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    Agreed - we had at least one along the way..... As noted by Valiant67, the Hemi badge didn't last too long.
     
  14. Rick Anderson

    Rick Anderson Well-Known Member

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    I agree with you, but have to add;

    Most people you'll ask can't even tell you what a V8 is or what it means, they'll say its a vegetable cocktail. For the market niche for most vehicles, potential purchasers will take it for a test drive, if they like it, and engine smoothness and power will be part of that assessment, they will buy it and let the hood rust shut from never being opened.

    They could care less, and can't even tell the difference between a turbo/super charged I4, a V6 or V8. That is why you'll see more I4's, turbos and V6's.

    Yes, there will always be some that want that V8, it will be a market niche, it will be more difficult to fill because of CAFE, emissions and regulation, etc. meaning it will be more expensive and more that want a V8 will have to settle for the V6 they can afford. But there will be a few that can afford it, and want it, and the free market will respond and provide a V8.
     
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  15. unverferth

    unverferth Well-Known Member

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    I like the way you think !
     
  16. Robert Johnson

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    I was a salesman all my adult life (or a sales manager). The first and most important thing good salespeople do is discover the customers needs; ask a customer a lot of questions to make sure you find the right fit for your customer....THEN start making suggestions about a product. There still are a lot of salespeople that sell cars in the old "Used Cars" Kurt Russel way of just putting people in a car and getting them to drive it. Every time I encountered a salesperson like that, I politely excused myself and left the dealership. Does a GM small block V8 sound better than the Ford EB 3.5 V6? You bet. But the Ford has more low end torque and will out perform the V8 equipped similar model every day of the week.

    There will always be a small % of people that will only want a V8 and that is totally fine, but that % will continue to shrink as time goes on. I personally would avoid getting a NA engine in the future. My wife and I love going up Hwy 80 to Reno or Hwy 50 to Tahoe for shows and vacations and would hate to be one of the wheezing NA cars at Echo summit in the slow lane. I have said before that I dont like the sound of 4s or 6s that much but if I had to pick between performance and engine sound, performance wins every day.

    Oh and if one does not know or remember "Used Cars", here is a link. One of the funniest movies...... Kind of like the "Caddyshack" of car movies.

    Used Cars - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
  17. Rick Anderson

    Rick Anderson Well-Known Member

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    There is yellow paint under the scratch on the new paint, did this car used to be a Taxi?
    No ma'am, that's just primer...........

    Of course the opening scene was an odometer turning backwards, and then Kurt Russel getting out from under the dash with a screwdriver.......
     
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  18. valiant67

    valiant67 ...

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    I think most people understand the "8" part of V8, but not the "V" part given the number of ads I see that mention V4 or V6 (when it's clearly a straight 6) engines.
     
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  19. Rick Anderson

    Rick Anderson Well-Known Member

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    I4?

    But your right, I think most people would know the number means the number of cylinders and that the more cylinders, the bigger and more powerful the engine and the less fuel efficient the engine (which is becoming less and less universally true now).

    What I see most, is people that have owned a car for years and can't tell you what engine it has. Including the number of cylinders. And they look at me like I'm the one with the problem for being little puzzled by that. And, its no co-incidence as I try to pop the hood to help them out with what ever problem, it takes an hour to get the hood open because the cables and latches are all so corroded and seized up from lack of use, because they have never open the hood of the vehicle. So that is the more realistic experience I was trying to relate, that I'm sure you've run into as well.

    Anyway, these folks, and there are more of them now, then people that have held out for a V8 their whole life, aren't even going to ask the salesman what engine is in the vehicle, let alone let it effect their purchasing decision. I'm sure if they did open the hood, they will be totally impressed with and sold on the fancy plastic cover that was installed over top the engine, thinking it is the actual engine and what it looks like.
     
    #559 Rick Anderson, Apr 13, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2016
  20. valiant67

    valiant67 ...

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    I'm not surprised people don't know the engine in their car. Many don't know the year. I've seen cars with the wrong year listed in ads (like 1993 or 1994 Neons) or the lady at the auto marts store I was behind who couldn't find wiper blades for her 2012 whatever. Part store guy went out to her car, came back inside and told her it was a 2013. Whatever the car was didn't exist in 2012.
     

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