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How reliable is the 3.0 diesel?

Discussion in 'Vans' started by Danny1983, Aug 12, 2020.

  1. Danny1983

    Danny1983 New Member

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    I'm looking at an 08 Dodge Sprinter w/ a 3.0 diesel that has 215000 miles on it. I've always heard how much more reliable diesels are the gas engines, and how 100,000 to 200,000 is getting broken in. So is 215000 ok or is it a tired and worn out engine at that mileage?
    Thanks
     
  2. Doug D

    Doug D Virginia Gentleman

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    Generally speaking, 500,000 miles out of diesel is very doable so 215,000 is not quite halfway based on that. However, given the problems FCA has had with the 3.0L diesel in the Ram 1500 I am not so sure. Maybe this one is a good one. Keep in mind diesel engines have higher maintenance and repair costs. A buddy of mine bought a Ram 1500 with the 3.0L EcoDiesel - an oil change at the dealer was $112. Compare that to the $55 I paid for an oil change on a Hemi.

    That said, I have 270,000+ miles on my '06 Dodge Ram 1500 Hemi. Still runs great.
     
  3. valiant67

    valiant67 ...

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    This is a Mercedes 3.0 diesel, not the FCA 3.0 EcoDiesel.
    This should be similar to what I always heard called the BlueTec diesel offered briefly in the Jeep grand Cherokee in the US.
    I'd read up on a few sites like this since this engine isn't something a lot of people will be familiar with:
    Mercedes-Benz & Sprinter OM642 BlueTec Diesel Issues/Problems | Stephens Service Center - Sacramento's Best Mercedes-Benz Service & Repairs (at http://www.stephensservice.com/bluetec-diesel-issuesproblems/ )
     
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  4. ImperialCrown

    ImperialCrown Moderator
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    The biggest issues I saw were because of diesel fuel and DEF quality. USLD is required. We still had carbon and soot deposit issues with Turbo, EGR cooler and valve. Sulphur is the enemy.
    I have been disillusioned with Daimler-Benz "quality". Some very good ideas, but some very bad ideas. Sprinters can be hard working trucks.
    There are Mopar chemicals to generally maintain diesel engines. Results will vary:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  5. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
    Staff Member Level III Supporter

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    Bob Sheaves, as I recall, said they were designed for roughly 200,000 miles... I might be mis-remembering.
     
  6. Tony K

    Tony K Active Member

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    ULSD is all that's available in the US and EU. What you need to know about the OM642 MB diesel is you have to use an MB Approval 229.51/52 oil with the DPF, or you will clog it up with the burnt off ash of higher ash oils like 229.5. The good thing is it has a large sump, so it will last. I'd recommend doing a used oil analysis a few thousand miles before recommended OCI to see how you're doing. Mine is about 155k miles, Blackstone said it looked great!

    Then, you need to watch out for the oil cooler leak because of a cheap seal. My 08 Grand Cherokee has this engine, and at some point, I'm going to have to replace this seal, and that's a painful process on the JGC, probably expensive if you get it done by a mechanic. It sets on top of the v-block, and you have to remove the turbo, intake manifolds, etc. to get to it. Not sure if that's easier on a Sprinter, but removing and reinstalling the the turbo is a pain. Mechanics charge major dollars on GCs because they remove the engine to do it. It sets back under the cowl next to the firewall on the Jeep.

    EGR and CCV return send soot back into the intakes causes them to coke up. These days, they've found a way to fix that without costing you an arm and a leg, by cleaning the intake side with walnut shell media, as I understand it. Shouldn't even have to remove the intake manifolds to do it, as I understand. The EPA stuff has to be maintained (if you're not lucky to have one that doesn't have those issues) or like other post-07 diesels, you're going to have problems. Also, the swirl flaps get stuck and throw codes, causing limp mode. The fix is easy and costs pennies. You just need to trick the computer with a cheap resistor similar to the resistor trick that shuts off the 1-4 skip shift on a Challenger 6M transmission.

    Plenty of stuff out there on this motor. Don't know anything about their AdBlue DEF system, but you have an 08 Dodge, so I'm *assuming* it doesn't have DEF. My 08 JGC doesn't have DEF. A 2008 MB car with that engine may have DEF. Not sure about MB-branded Sprinters.
     
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  7. MJAB

    MJAB Well-Known Member

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    U.S.A. ULSD suplhus maximum content is 15 ppm, in EU maximum is 10 ppm (since 2009).
    Another important value is the cetane number, in U.S.A., if I not wrong the minimum is 40, in EU is 51 (and cetane index minimum 46) and premium diesel higher than 60.
    California has a minimum of 53 for the cetane number.

    Higher the cetane number better, shorter and complete is the combustion.

    Life of diesel engines (as for gasoline ones) is also function of the design specifications.
     
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  8. Tony K

    Tony K Active Member

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    When the US went to ULSD 15 ppm and the EU to 10 ppm, that drove the transatlantic petroleum distillate market to 10 ppm ULSD, because it made it exportable either way. In 2013, the US was the biggest supplier of ULSD to Europe. Presumptively, much of the ULSD in the US is actually 10 ppm or less.
     
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  9. MJAB

    MJAB Well-Known Member

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    One of the big problems with modern diesels is when someone unfortunately happens to go in a fuel station that is not well managed. Contamination of diesel blend, residues on bottom that are not made sediment after refuel and probably the worst enemy the water. If so much that fulfills the water separator in the vehicle than big damahges can occur to high pressure pump and/or injectors.
    Unfortunately it happens more often than should be.
     
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  10. ImperialCrown

    ImperialCrown Moderator
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    I know that with the domestic Cummins diesels, there is a WIF (water-in-fuel) sensor and dash warning. The fuel filter is also fine enough that water won't pass through it.
    Some poisonous 'moonshine bio-diesel' was a problem around here and some farmers were evading taxes by burning agri-diesel also. We were checking for the proper fuel dye color when trucks came in for driveability concerns.
     
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  11. MJAB

    MJAB Well-Known Member

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    There is the sensor also in almost all diesel filters of modern diesel engines (FCA has also in the smaller ones with with very good filters). The problem is that many continue to run even if the light goes on. When water is too much in the filter it will pass through it and than the potential big problems start.

    If the light goes on one should stop and purge the water from the filter, if knows how do it.
     
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  12. Tony K

    Tony K Active Member

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    Indiana State Police Motor Carrier Enforcement here have been known to do fuel check stings outside of livestock sales and farm auctions. Got the point across real quick. We don't usually have a problem with agri-diesel quality in Indiana, unless farmers are buying cheap pipeline-grade stuff from a local distributor who doesn't have his act together. Countrymark Ag Fuels has a refinery near Evansville, which is "back home," and owns its own wells all over that IN-IL-KY Tri-state area. We always used the top quality Co-op-branded diesel on our farm. Expensive diesel engines are worth treating right.
     
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