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LED flashlights BAD....

Discussion in 'Off Topic But Still Civil' started by voiceofstl, Jun 28, 2020.

  1. voiceofstl

    voiceofstl Well-Known Member

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    I got a couple of 20.25 year old standard flashlights. When the batterys wear out I change them. No big deal.
    LED flashlights.....when I change the batterys I get around a %25 failure rate, the flashlights just doesn't work. I end up just throwing them away.
    What the story with that??
    I'M SICK OF IT!!!
     
  2. valiant67

    valiant67 ...

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    Simple solution, buy old, used flashlights.
     
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  3. 06PTElectricBlue

    06PTElectricBlue Active Member

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    Not just flashlights, but I had some expensive LED bulbs for the brake lights and reverse lights on my PT Cruiser. Now, be reminded that the reverse lights are very seldom used, but within a short time I had one brake light LED bulb burn out and also one reverse light bulb. :(

    I took them out an went back with standard incandescent bulbs, which are also much cheaper. :)

    But I thought LED's in general were supposed to last longer, I thought that was there great selling point?! ;)

    But I have seen a lot of LED strips that are used on newer vehicles, and some of the LED's are already not working on them, and I'm pretty sure that to replace that entire LED strip would be very expensive. ;)
     
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  4. valiant67

    valiant67 ...

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    LEDs are like anything else. Some are well made and some are cheap.
     
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  5. freshforged

    freshforged Well-Known Member

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    Really crappy qc and probably poor quality of current. Have you over looked at the buffering circuitry inside of most high end led lightbulbs? Nowhere to be found in most led flashlights.
     
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  6. rapidtrans

    rapidtrans Well-Known Member

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    LEDs seem more robust than Incandescent bulb flashlights IMO. The old filament style bulbs tended to break when they get knocked around on a job site. Just don’t buy the cheap led flashlights.
    They’re also brighter and battery life is longer.
     
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  7. Bob Lincoln

    Bob Lincoln "CHECK FAULT CODES"
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    Don't buy crap.
    I bought a rechargeable LED flashlight at Lowes a couple of years ago. It is bright and it works GREAT. It has an array of LED chips off the top and off the side, is hinged to 90 degrees with a magnetic base, and recharges via USB. No batteries to buy. Very reliable. Lasts about 4 hours on a charge, and recharges in about 2 hours. I just bought a bunch more, both rechargeable and replaceable battery. They all work great. But they are not cheap - $20 each.
     
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  8. desavona

    desavona Active Member

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    I recommend buying Olight rechargeable flashlights. Extremely well designed and have a great light spread. Higher initial cost but the rechargeable batteries pay for the flashlight over time.
     
  9. DC-93

    DC-93 Well-Known Member

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    One word: Maglite.

    Never any issues.
    Have one over 30 years old, on the second bulb!

    Best part, it was a gift!
     
  10. Tony K

    Tony K Active Member

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    Don't buy cheap junk. Get an LED MagLite. Problem solved.
     
  11. DC-93

    DC-93 Well-Known Member

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    The older 4 cell Maglites are great for personal protection, too. :cool:

    Keep one next to your seat in the car.
     
  12. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
    Staff Member Level III Supporter

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    MagLights are great American made flashlights as long as you never have the alkaline batteries swell. Then it's new $30 flashlight time.

    However... a LOT of the LED flashlights are actually great products. Make sure they take a standard size battery, e.g. AA. I have a few that I bought years ago that are all still working perfectly. Tiny AA flashlights, better light than with the old dual-D-cell ones, and they go a year on one set of NiMH batteries or a few years on alkalines. (I use genuine from-B&H-not-Amazon Eneloops for NiMH. Other brands are highly variable.)
     
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  13. freshforged

    freshforged Well-Known Member

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    As a former hotel night auditor who had to do hourly security checks between the separate building on a wooded urban campus, I endorse this message!
     
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  14. 06PTElectricBlue

    06PTElectricBlue Active Member

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    I had that happen once, the batteries inside one of my Maglites went bad and I could only get out the first battery. I don't remember what brand of batteries it was but I contacted the company, sent them the old light and they sent me back a brand new Maglite and it was even better than the ruined one. :)

    I've got several Maglites, some C some D, 2-cell, 3-cell, never had a problem with any of them :)

    [​IMG]
     
    #14 06PTElectricBlue, Jun 30, 2020
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2020
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  15. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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    I find with their new LED models, you can get a good deal of life out of AA NiMH batteries (in cheap adapters). Then you never have to deal with battery swell.

    I think part of my issue is just that I have a MagLight that's really for emergencies. I'd do better if I didn't leave the batteries in it. I didn't think of going back to the company. (Some people spray WD-40 in them. This is really a more common problem than you may think.)

    Still, hard to argue with made-in-USA goodness. That said, I have a few excellent off-brand LED flashlights that never gave me any trouble. Part of it is where you buy them.
     
  16. Bob Lincoln

    Bob Lincoln "CHECK FAULT CODES"
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    The great advantage to the USB-charging LED flashlights that I found, is that we already had USB cables in the car. It means that we can recharge the flashlight in the car, and even when it's depleted, plug in and get at least a dim light within a few minutes.
     
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